Cystic Fibrosis News and Research RSS Feed - Cystic Fibrosis News and Research

Cystic fibrosis is a life threatening, inherited disease of the exocrine glands. The condition primarily affects the digestive and respiratory systems which become clogged with a thick, sticky mucus.

Cystic fibrosis is caused by a mutation in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene which results in an excess of salt and water passing into cells, causing a thick, sticky mucus to build up in bodily passageways.

In the airways, this mucus causes a persistent cough, wheezing, breathlessness, and repeated lung infections. In the digestive tract, the tubes that carry digestive enzymes from the pancreas into the small intestine become blocked, preventing the proper absorption of food nutrients. This can lead to poor weight gain, intestinal blockage (particularly in newborns), and foul-smelling, greasy stools.

There is no cure for cystic fibrosis, so treatment aims to ease symptoms and make the condition easier to live with. Bronchodilators may be used to help expand the airways, antibiotics to treat chest infections and physiotherapy can help expel mucus from the lungs.
The condition is most common in white people of northern European descent and is estimated to occurs in 1 in every 2,500 babies born in the UK, where babies are screened at birth for cystic fibrosis as part of the National Health Service newborn screening programme.
Researchers explore ins and outs of genome sequencing in newborns

Researchers explore ins and outs of genome sequencing in newborns

When you have a baby, a nurse or a phlebotomist performs a heel stick to take a few drops of blood from your infant and sends it off to a state lab for a battery of tests. [More]
HUB and Dutch health insurance companies to test use of organoid technology for CF treatment

HUB and Dutch health insurance companies to test use of organoid technology for CF treatment

Hubrecht Organoid Technology (HUB), and the health insurance companies CZ, Zilveren Kruis, and Menzis announced today that they will start a €3 million validation trial for use of HUB Organoid Technology to test if it can be used to determine the response of Cystic Fibrosis (CF) patients to new drug therapies. [More]
UNC Catalyst aims to provide knowledge and research tools to tackle rare diseases

UNC Catalyst aims to provide knowledge and research tools to tackle rare diseases

Freely giving researchers the tools and knowledge to tackle rare and orphaned diseases is the mission of UNC Catalyst, a new endeavor the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill has launched with a $2 million grant from the Eshelman Institute for Innovation. [More]
Giving polycystic kidney disease the bump

Giving polycystic kidney disease the bump

We launched this campaign at the beginning of October 2016. It's the first time that we've ever had a campaign of this size and scope. It's a European campaign in multiple languages that's coordinated by six of the organizations that represent PKD patients in Europe. [More]
Study reports volume and cost of in-home care for children with special medical conditions

Study reports volume and cost of in-home care for children with special medical conditions

U.S. families provide nearly $36 billion annually in uncompensated medical care at home to children who have special health care needs, such as muscular dystrophy and cystic fibrosis, according to a large national study. [More]
Study tracks parents' unpaid time assisting children with special health care needs

Study tracks parents' unpaid time assisting children with special health care needs

About half of U.S. children with special health care needs -- 5.6 million children -- receive medical care from uncompensated family members worth billions of dollars, finds a large national study led by Boston Children's Hospital and the University of Southern California (USC). [More]
Researchers identify protein that degrades and inhibits infectious biofilms

Researchers identify protein that degrades and inhibits infectious biofilms

Many infectious pathogens are difficult to treat because they develop into biofilms, layers of metabolically active but slowly growing bacteria embedded in a protective layer of slime, which are inherently more resistant to antibiotics. [More]
New drug treatment can override genetic fault that causes choroideremia

New drug treatment can override genetic fault that causes choroideremia

Researchers with funding from Fight for Sight have demonstrated that a new drug treatment for cystic fibrosis and Duchenne muscular dystrophy can override a genetic fault that causes choroideremia – a severe blinding disorder. [More]
Elucigene collaborates with Congenica to develop new NGS kit for cystic fibrosis

Elucigene collaborates with Congenica to develop new NGS kit for cystic fibrosis

The emergence of new therapies that treat the causes of cystic fibrosis are creating an imperative for more accurate variant analysis. [More]
New UGA research finds pathogen's motility activates immune response

New UGA research finds pathogen's motility activates immune response

Until now, a pathogen's ability to move through the body has been overlooked as a possible trigger of immune response, but new research from the University of Georgia College of Veterinary Medicine found that motility will indeed alarm the host and activate an immune response. [More]
New three-dimensional map of cystic fibrosis protein offers new insights to treating fatal disease

New three-dimensional map of cystic fibrosis protein offers new insights to treating fatal disease

Rockefeller scientists have created the first three-dimensional map of the protein responsible for cystic fibrosis, an inherited disease for which there is no cure. [More]
MILabs to provide Adaptive X-ray CT system to UAB for advancing pulmonary research

MILabs to provide Adaptive X-ray CT system to UAB for advancing pulmonary research

MILabs will provide an advanced U-CTUHR microCT system to the Cystic Fibrosis Research Center (CFRC) at the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB). [More]
UL researchers secure funding for new cystic fibrosis device

UL researchers secure funding for new cystic fibrosis device

A medical device for Cystic Fibrosis (CF) sufferers which lessens their exposure to infections resulting in fewer doctors’ visits, reduced antibiotic usage and shorter hospital stays, is expected to be market ready within two years. [More]
WSU researchers develop novel technology to treat chronic wound infections

WSU researchers develop novel technology to treat chronic wound infections

A WSU research team has successfully used a mild electric current to take on and beat drug-resistant bacterial infections, a technology that may eventually be used to treat chronic wound infections. [More]
New appointment to accelerate discovery of patient-centred medicines

New appointment to accelerate discovery of patient-centred medicines

The new Medicines Discovery Catapult (MDC) is pleased to announce the appointment of Ed Owen to put medical research charities and patient groups at the heart of the development of new therapies in the UK. [More]
ASGCT seeks to educate public and policy-makers on fundamentals of gene editing

ASGCT seeks to educate public and policy-makers on fundamentals of gene editing

On Nov. 21, 2016, the American Society of Gene & Cell Therapy released Therapeutic Gene Editing: an ASGCT White Paper, intended to provide policy-makers, patient advocates, and the interested public with the necessary background information in anticipation of an upcoming consensus report on human gene editing from the National Academy of Sciences and National Academy of Medicine (NAS), expected to be released in early 2017. [More]
NTM lung infections

NTM lung infections

Nontuberculous mycobacteria are part of a group of bacteria called mycobacteria. The non-tuberculous mycobacteria are, as the name suggests, mycobacteria that are not tuberculosis. They're also not leprosy, but they are the other members of the bacteria group termed mycobacteria. [More]
Palliative care improves patients' survival and quality of life, study shows

Palliative care improves patients' survival and quality of life, study shows

People living with serious illness who receive palliative care have better quality of life and fewer symptoms than those who don't receive palliative care, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. [More]
Getting drugs to bugs in NTM lung infections: an interview with Dr Jakko van Ingen

Getting drugs to bugs in NTM lung infections: an interview with Dr Jakko van Ingen

The first thing that is important to stress is that this is an area that we actually know very little about. What we generally think, rather than know, is that NTM has a lot in common with pulmonary tuberculosis. [More]
Six pioneering French companies to exhibit in innovation zone at Medica 2016

Six pioneering French companies to exhibit in innovation zone at Medica 2016

In a global market worth almost €200 billion (around £173 billion) a year, the medical devices and in vitro diagnostics sector is particularly innovative in France. Across the Channel, the sector is comprised of over a thousand companies, employing almost 65,000 people with expertise encompassing medicine, mechanics, material physics and digital technologies. [More]
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