Cystic Fibrosis News and Research RSS Feed - Cystic Fibrosis News and Research

Cystic fibrosis is a life threatening, inherited disease of the exocrine glands. The condition primarily affects the digestive and respiratory systems which become clogged with a thick, sticky mucus.

Cystic fibrosis is caused by a mutation in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene which results in an excess of salt and water passing into cells, causing a thick, sticky mucus to build up in bodily passageways.

In the airways, this mucus causes a persistent cough, wheezing, breathlessness, and repeated lung infections. In the digestive tract, the tubes that carry digestive enzymes from the pancreas into the small intestine become blocked, preventing the proper absorption of food nutrients. This can lead to poor weight gain, intestinal blockage (particularly in newborns), and foul-smelling, greasy stools.

There is no cure for cystic fibrosis, so treatment aims to ease symptoms and make the condition easier to live with. Bronchodilators may be used to help expand the airways, antibiotics to treat chest infections and physiotherapy can help expel mucus from the lungs.
The condition is most common in white people of northern European descent and is estimated to occurs in 1 in every 2,500 babies born in the UK, where babies are screened at birth for cystic fibrosis as part of the National Health Service newborn screening programme.
Researchers now developing digital support device to help CF sufferers monitor treatment

Researchers now developing digital support device to help CF sufferers monitor treatment

People with cystic fibrosis (CF) need help to ensure they are getting correct nutrition and the right amount of enzymes. They also need constant reminders. Researchers are now developing a digital support device to promote autonomy, but are finding that this is no easy task. [More]
Aflatoxin exposure can weaken airways' defenses opening door for severe respiratory diseases

Aflatoxin exposure can weaken airways' defenses opening door for severe respiratory diseases

Toxins from mold found growing on nuts or corn can weaken the airways' self-clearing mechanisms and immunity, opening the door for respiratory diseases and exacerbating existing ones, suggests a study in Nature Scientific Reports published this month from otolaryngology researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. [More]
Aspergillus fungus can easily adapt to changing environments, researchers find

Aspergillus fungus can easily adapt to changing environments, researchers find

The fungus Aspergillus fumigatus is capable of rapid genetic adaptation in both natural environments and in humans according to a study published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases by Radboud university medical center/CWZ and Wageningen University & Research. [More]
Gene therapy may be viable approach for treating CF lung problems

Gene therapy may be viable approach for treating CF lung problems

Two new studies from the University of Iowa suggest that gene therapy may be a viable approach for treating or preventing lung disease caused by cystic fibrosis. [More]
University of Melbourne ethicist encourages doctors to respect parents’ opinions on treatment decisions for children

University of Melbourne ethicist encourages doctors to respect parents’ opinions on treatment decisions for children

A University of Melbourne ethicist is encouraging doctors to recognise the autonomy of parents, even if this could mean “less than optimal” treatment decisions for their children. [More]
Research offers new insights into underlying mechanisms of deadly cystic fibrosis

Research offers new insights into underlying mechanisms of deadly cystic fibrosis

A minor hiccup in the sequence of a human gene can have devastating impacts on health. Such flaws cause cystic fibrosis (CF), a disease affecting the lungs and other vital organs, often leading to death by the age of 30. [More]
Viral vector-based approaches could improve effectiveness of CFTR gene therapy

Viral vector-based approaches could improve effectiveness of CFTR gene therapy

Cystic fibrosis (CF) is characterized by accumulation of thick mucus in the lungs and is associated with a high incidence of bacterial infection. Mutations in the gene encoding CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) underlie the disease. [More]
Preimplantation genetic screening using next generation sequencing: an interview with Dr Luis Alcaraz

Preimplantation genetic screening using next generation sequencing: an interview with Dr Luis Alcaraz

PGS, Preimplantation Genetic Screening, is a genetic test that analyses biopsied cells from embryos produced by in vitro fertilization (IVF) techniques. PGS determines whether the embryos are chromosomally normal (euploid) or not (aneuploid), thus giving the chance to transfer chromosomally normal embryos that are more apt to successfully implant and develop into a pregnancy. [More]
Low selenium levels linked to liver cancer risk? An interview with Dr David Hughes

Low selenium levels linked to liver cancer risk? An interview with Dr David Hughes

Food provides us with a variety of substances we need to maintain life. These substances are essential nutrients and are classified as macronutrients (water, protein, fats, and carbohydrates) and micronutrients (vitamins and minerals). [More]
New lung scanning platform holds potential to improve treatment for people with lung disease

New lung scanning platform holds potential to improve treatment for people with lung disease

New lung scanning technology developed at Monash University has the potential to transform treatment for millions of people with lung disease in Australia and around the world. [More]
Adding DNA sequencing to newborn screenings may increase early diagnosis of cystic fibrosis

Adding DNA sequencing to newborn screenings may increase early diagnosis of cystic fibrosis

A study by researchers at Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Brigham and Women's Hospital and the California Department of Public Health suggests that all babies with a known mutation for cystic fibrosis (CF) and second mutation called the 5T allele should receive additional screening in order to better predict the risk of developing CF later in life. [More]
BET inhibitor treatment decreases lung inflammation in mice

BET inhibitor treatment decreases lung inflammation in mice

Patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) suffer from chronic respiratory infections, primarily caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which lead to airway inflammation and damage. [More]
Researchers discover how Zika virus travels from pregnant mother to fetus

Researchers discover how Zika virus travels from pregnant mother to fetus

Zika virus can infect numerous cell types in the human placenta and amniotic sac, according to researchers at UC San Francisco and UC Berkeley who show in a new paper how the virus travels from a pregnant woman to her fetus. They also identify a drug that may be able to block it. [More]
New report reveals prescription medication costs may increase up to 13% in 2016

New report reveals prescription medication costs may increase up to 13% in 2016

Prescription medication costs are expected to rise at least 11 percent, and possibly up to 13 percent, in 2016, according to a new report on national trends and projections in prescription drug expenditures. [More]
Scientists uncover structure of cold virus linked to severe asthma, respiratory infections in children

Scientists uncover structure of cold virus linked to severe asthma, respiratory infections in children

The atomic structure of an elusive cold virus linked to severe asthma and respiratory infections in children has been solved by a team of researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and Purdue University. [More]
Sex-related difference could have impact on treatment of metabolic diseases

Sex-related difference could have impact on treatment of metabolic diseases

In health research, most preliminary studies in animals only examine effects of drug treatment in one sex, assuming that males and females will have few differences in how a drug works. [More]
Tiny viruses speed-up evolution of bacteria causing infections in cystic fibrosis patients

Tiny viruses speed-up evolution of bacteria causing infections in cystic fibrosis patients

SCIENTISTS in the UK have found new evidence that tiny viruses called bacteriophages turbo-charge the evolution of bacteria that cause lung infections in Cystic Fibrosis patients. [More]
Mitochondrial DNA levels may represent accurate, predictive measure of embryo viability in IVF

Mitochondrial DNA levels may represent accurate, predictive measure of embryo viability in IVF

Despite the claims and counter-claims for new embryo assessment techniques introduced over the past two decades, the search for the holy grail of assisted reproduction - the key to the embryo destined to implant - continues. [More]
Inhalable ibuprofen holds potential to treat cystic fibrosis

Inhalable ibuprofen holds potential to treat cystic fibrosis

Ibuprofen: You can buy it at any drug store, and it will help with that stabbing headache or sprained ankle. One of the ways it does so is by reducing inflammation, and it is this property that may also help patients with cystic fibrosis. [More]
Advances in inhaled drug delivery: an interview with Dr Robert Clarke

Advances in inhaled drug delivery: an interview with Dr Robert Clarke

Delivering drugs to the lungs via inhalation has a number of potential advantages over traditional routes of administration like pills or injections. For treating pulmonary diseases, the obvious logic we are applying is topical delivery to the airways via inhalation. [More]
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