Cystic Fibrosis News and Research RSS Feed - Cystic Fibrosis News and Research

Cystic fibrosis is a life threatening, inherited disease of the exocrine glands. The condition primarily affects the digestive and respiratory systems which become clogged with a thick, sticky mucus.

Cystic fibrosis is caused by a mutation in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene which results in an excess of salt and water passing into cells, causing a thick, sticky mucus to build up in bodily passageways.

In the airways, this mucus causes a persistent cough, wheezing, breathlessness, and repeated lung infections. In the digestive tract, the tubes that carry digestive enzymes from the pancreas into the small intestine become blocked, preventing the proper absorption of food nutrients. This can lead to poor weight gain, intestinal blockage (particularly in newborns), and foul-smelling, greasy stools.

There is no cure for cystic fibrosis, so treatment aims to ease symptoms and make the condition easier to live with. Bronchodilators may be used to help expand the airways, antibiotics to treat chest infections and physiotherapy can help expel mucus from the lungs.
The condition is most common in white people of northern European descent and is estimated to occurs in 1 in every 2,500 babies born in the UK, where babies are screened at birth for cystic fibrosis as part of the National Health Service newborn screening programme.
CF patients require close monitoring for resistance to ganciclovir after lung transplantation

CF patients require close monitoring for resistance to ganciclovir after lung transplantation

A drug called ganciclovir is given to lung transplant patients to protect against a life-threatening virus that is common after transplantation. [More]
IRCM researchers uncover mechanism that regulates dopamine levels in the brain

IRCM researchers uncover mechanism that regulates dopamine levels in the brain

Researchers in Montréal led by Jacques Drouin, D.Sc., uncovered a mechanism regulating dopamine levels in the brain by working on a mouse model of late onset Parkinson's disease. [More]
Chemical chaperone: A new therapeutic option for epilepsy

Chemical chaperone: A new therapeutic option for epilepsy

Researchers found out that the conformational defect in a specific protein causes Autosomal Dominant Lateral Temporal Lobe Epilepsy (ADLTE) which is a form of familial epilepsy. They showed that treatment with chemical corrector called "chemical chaperone" ameliorates increased seizure susceptibility in a mouse model of human epilepsy by correcting the conformational defect. [More]
Drug proves effective at inhibiting growth of drug-resistant bacteria

Drug proves effective at inhibiting growth of drug-resistant bacteria

A treatment pioneered at the University of Pittsburgh Center for Vaccine Research is far more effective than traditional antibiotics at inhibiting the growth of drug-resistant bacteria, including so-called "superbugs" resistant to almost all existing antibiotics, which plague hospitals and nursing homes. [More]
Study sheds new light on well-known mechanism required for immune response

Study sheds new light on well-known mechanism required for immune response

A new study published in the scientific journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America sheds new light on a well-known mechanism required for the immune response. Researchers at the IRCM, led by Tarik Möröy, PhD, identified a protein that controls the activity of the p53 tumour suppressor protein known as the "guardian of the genome". [More]
PulmoFlow's nebulized drug and device combination gets FDA approval for cystic fibrosis

PulmoFlow's nebulized drug and device combination gets FDA approval for cystic fibrosis

On Tuesday, the FDA granted final approval of PulmoFlow, Inc.'s New Drug Application for Kitabis Pak – a co-packaging of generic tobramycin inhalation solution with a PARI LC PLUS Nebulizer. This is the first nebulized drug and device combination to be approved for patients with cystic fibrosis. [More]
FDA takes immediate steps to help reduce risk of spreading unsuspected uterine cancer

FDA takes immediate steps to help reduce risk of spreading unsuspected uterine cancer

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is taking immediate steps to help reduce the risk of spreading unsuspected cancer in women being treated for uterine fibroids, which is in keeping with Kalorama Information's view that in the female health market there is much room for improvement both in the development of products and the treatment of diseases. [More]
Bayer's Amikacin Inhale and Ciprofloxacin DPI receive QIDP designation from FDA

Bayer's Amikacin Inhale and Ciprofloxacin DPI receive QIDP designation from FDA

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has granted qualified infectious disease product (QIDP) designation to two Bayer investigational agents, Amikacin Inhale and Ciprofloxacin Dry Powder for Inhalation (DPI). [More]
Unique ability helps prolific bacterium to afflict humans, animals and even plants

Unique ability helps prolific bacterium to afflict humans, animals and even plants

New research has found that one of the world's most prolific bacteria manages to afflict humans, animals and even plants by way of a mechanism not before seen in any infectious microorganism -- a sense of touch. This unique ability helps make the bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa ubiquitous, but it also might leave these antibiotic-resistant organisms vulnerable to a new form of treatment. [More]
TSRI study examines body’s own response against chronic protein misfolding

TSRI study examines body’s own response against chronic protein misfolding

“Protein misfolding” diseases such as cystic fibrosis and Alzheimer’s may be seriously exacerbated by the body’s own response against that misfolding, according to a new study led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute. [More]

Anthera Pharmaceuticals reports net loss of $7.0 million for third quarter 2014

Anthera Pharmaceuticals, Inc., today announced financial results and operational update for the third quarter ended September 30, 2014. [More]
Salivary mucins protect teeth from cariogenic bacterium

Salivary mucins protect teeth from cariogenic bacterium

Salivary mucins, key components of mucus, actively protect the teeth from the cariogenic bacterium, Streptococcus mutans, according to research published ahead of print in Applied and Environmental Microbiology. The research suggests that bolstering native defenses might be a better way to fight dental caries than relying on exogenous materials, such as sealants and fluoride treatment, says first author Erica Shapiro Frenkel, of Harvard University, Cambridge, MA. [More]
Murdoch University researchers receive NHMRC grant to develop genetic drugs for rare diseases

Murdoch University researchers receive NHMRC grant to develop genetic drugs for rare diseases

Murdoch University researchers from the Centre for Comparative Genomics have received almost $800,000 in funding from the National Health and Medical Research Council to develop genetic drugs to treat rare diseases. [More]
Calchan, Galapagos partner to discover and develop novel target for osteoarthritic pain

Calchan, Galapagos partner to discover and develop novel target for osteoarthritic pain

Calchan Holdings Limited, a UK company focused on the development of novel medicines based on calcium ion channel modulators, and Galapagos NV, a clinical stage biotech company focused on developing novel mode of action medicines, today announce that they have entered into a research collaboration in the area of osteoarthritis pain. [More]
Aseptika launches Contactless Thermometer and Pulse Oximeter

Aseptika launches Contactless Thermometer and Pulse Oximeter

With the winter flu and cold season almost upon us we can stock up and take some steps to prepare at home for this eventuality. Having a flu jab, eating well, getting lots of exercise and sleep, and maintain good personal hygiene all help in preventing flu and colds. [More]
Antibiotic-resistant bacteria share resources to cause chronic infections, show studies

Antibiotic-resistant bacteria share resources to cause chronic infections, show studies

Antibiotic-resistant bacteria can share resources to cause chronic infections, Vanderbilt University investigators have discovered. [More]
Major scientific breakthrough in understanding retinal degenerative diseases that cause blindness

Major scientific breakthrough in understanding retinal degenerative diseases that cause blindness

An important scientific breakthrough by a team of IRCM researchers led by Michel Cayouette, PhD, is being published today by The Journal of Neuroscience. The Montréal scientists discovered that a protein found in the retina plays an essential role in the function and survival of light-sensing cells that are required for vision. [More]

Tannic acid may help ease impact of bacterial lung infections in CF patients

By screening over 2,000 approved drugs and natural products, scientists have shown that tannic acid may help ease the impact of bacterial lung infections in cystic fibrosis patients. [More]
International Biophysics files patent protection for revolutionary AffloVest

International Biophysics files patent protection for revolutionary AffloVest

International Biophysics Corporation of Austin, Texas announces its filing of U.S. patent protection for its revolutionary AffloVest. The company has also recently confirmed exclusive ownership rights concerning the manufacture, sale and distribution of the AffloVest in its markets. [More]
Childhood eating disorders could have underlying psychological issues, researchers warn

Childhood eating disorders could have underlying psychological issues, researchers warn

Researchers at the University of Montreal and its affiliated CHU Sainte-Justine children's hospital are warning parents that difficult eaters could have underlying psychological issues, as they have found that restrictive behaviours can appear before puberty. [More]