Cystic Fibrosis News and Research RSS Feed - Cystic Fibrosis News and Research

Cystic fibrosis is a life threatening, inherited disease of the exocrine glands. The condition primarily affects the digestive and respiratory systems which become clogged with a thick, sticky mucus.

Cystic fibrosis is caused by a mutation in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene which results in an excess of salt and water passing into cells, causing a thick, sticky mucus to build up in bodily passageways.

In the airways, this mucus causes a persistent cough, wheezing, breathlessness, and repeated lung infections. In the digestive tract, the tubes that carry digestive enzymes from the pancreas into the small intestine become blocked, preventing the proper absorption of food nutrients. This can lead to poor weight gain, intestinal blockage (particularly in newborns), and foul-smelling, greasy stools.

There is no cure for cystic fibrosis, so treatment aims to ease symptoms and make the condition easier to live with. Bronchodilators may be used to help expand the airways, antibiotics to treat chest infections and physiotherapy can help expel mucus from the lungs.
The condition is most common in white people of northern European descent and is estimated to occurs in 1 in every 2,500 babies born in the UK, where babies are screened at birth for cystic fibrosis as part of the National Health Service newborn screening programme.
New clinical data highlights potential of AB-PA01 to treat P. aeruginosa infections in CF patients

New clinical data highlights potential of AB-PA01 to treat P. aeruginosa infections in CF patients

AmpliPhi Biosciences Corporation, a global leader in the development of bacteriophage-based antibacterial therapies to treat drug-resistant infections, presented data at the European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases summarizing both the in vitro and in vivo activity of its proprietary, investigational phage mix AB-PA01. [More]

Scientists develop wearable sweat sensors for medical analysis of sweat

Plants and trees soak up water in the soil by letting it vaporize through pores in the leaves. Scientists at Eindhoven University of Technology (TU/e) have now taken this principle to develop a sweat sensor through which the sweat itself flows at a steady rate and is analyzed. [More]
UT Southwestern scientists discover mutation that causes X-linked reticulate pigmentary disorder

UT Southwestern scientists discover mutation that causes X-linked reticulate pigmentary disorder

UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers have discovered a mutation that causes a rare systemic disorder known as X-linked reticulate pigmentary disorder (XLPDR) and, significantly, the unexpected cellular mechanism by which the mutation causes the disease. [More]
Simple tips to help parents and children lead a healthy life

Simple tips to help parents and children lead a healthy life

Obesity is almost at epidemic proportions; it has more than doubled in children and tripled in adolescents in the past 30 years nationwide. Rosa Cataldo, DO, MPH, Director of the Healthy Weight & Wellness Center at Stony Brook Children's Hospital, says that the most effective approach to addressing weight loss in children are lifestyle-based modifications that involve parents. [More]
Personalized medicine promises better treatment options for cystic fibrosis patients

Personalized medicine promises better treatment options for cystic fibrosis patients

For a highly variable disease like cystic fibrosis, personalized medicine promises treatments based on individual factors, down to the molecular level. This promise is especially alluring for the treatment of children with cystic fibrosis, who are at particular risk for complications that could affect them throughout their lives. [More]
Mucus may hold key to better cancer treatment

Mucus may hold key to better cancer treatment

What do cancer cells and a runny nose have in common? The answer is mucus; and researchers at the Stephenson Cancer Center at the University of Oklahoma have shown it may hold the key to making cancer treatment better. [More]
New computer program and electronic stethoscope developed to diagnose lung problems

New computer program and electronic stethoscope developed to diagnose lung problems

The classic stethoscope has entered the digital age. Medical researchers have created a computer program that connects to an electronic stethoscope to classify lung sounds into five common diagnostic categories. [More]
UAB researchers use Malvern’s NanoSight NS300 system to figure out role of exosomes in disease transmission

UAB researchers use Malvern’s NanoSight NS300 system to figure out role of exosomes in disease transmission

Data measured using the NanoSight NS300 from Malvern Instruments is providing new insights into the role of exosomes in diseases such as cancer, arthritis, Alzheimer’s disease and cystic fibrosis, in pioneering research at the University of Alabama - Birmingham (UAB). [More]
UA College of Pharmacy assistant professor developing dry powder inhalers to treat pulmonary diseases

UA College of Pharmacy assistant professor developing dry powder inhalers to treat pulmonary diseases

Heidi M. Mansour, PhD, assistant professor in the University of Arizona College of Pharmacy, is working to develop advanced dry powder inhalers to treat and prevent pulmonary diseases. [More]
Researchers take major step towards developing a cystic fibrosis drug

Researchers take major step towards developing a cystic fibrosis drug

Researchers from Eindhoven University of Technology and McGill University in Montreal (Canada) have taken an important step towards developing a drug against cystic fibrosis. [More]
Alternative splicing: a new approach to drug development? An interview with Lucy Donaldson

Alternative splicing: a new approach to drug development? An interview with Lucy Donaldson

RNA is becoming an interesting drug target as it takes possible intervention back one step to the synthesis of a target protein, instead of trying to block or inhibit a process. [More]
Three Case Western faculty members receive funding to develop new diagnostic technologies

Three Case Western faculty members receive funding to develop new diagnostic technologies

Three Case Western Reserve University faculty members have received funding to further develop emerging technologies aimed at malaria, cystic fibrosis, and sickle cell anemia. [More]
Insights into exosomes role in disease transmission gained using NanoSight from Malvern

Insights into exosomes role in disease transmission gained using NanoSight from Malvern

Data measured using the NanoSight NS300 from Malvern Instruments is providing new insights into the role of exosomes in diseases such as cancer, arthritis, Alzheimer’s disease and cystic fibrosis, in pioneering research at the University of Alabama - Birmingham (UAB). [More]
New breakthrough drug shows promise to fight antibiotic-resistant infections

New breakthrough drug shows promise to fight antibiotic-resistant infections

A New York pharmaceutical company, TGV-Laboratories, has developed a groundbreaking drug that shows promise in treating a wide variety of antibiotic-resistant fungal and bacterial infections. [More]
CosmosID announces $6M in Series B funding round

CosmosID announces $6M in Series B funding round

CosmosID, the leading genomic big data company focused on microbiome research, outbreak investigations, and infectious disease diagnostics, using next-generation DNA sequencing, announced $6M in Series B funding. [More]
Oral drug ivacaftor appears to be safe, beneficial to pre-school children with specific type of cystic fibrosis

Oral drug ivacaftor appears to be safe, beneficial to pre-school children with specific type of cystic fibrosis

The oral drug ivacaftor appears to be safe and could be beneficial to young children between the ages of 2 and 5 with a specific type of cystic fibrosis, according to new research published in The Lancet Respiratory Medicine journal. [More]
New machine-learning technique could be used to uncover previously unknown features of organisms

New machine-learning technique could be used to uncover previously unknown features of organisms

A powerful new machine-learning technique can be applied to large datasets in the biological sciences to uncover previously unknown features of organisms and their genes, according to a team led by researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. [More]
Pulmonary neuroendocrine cells act like sensor to orchestrate immune response

Pulmonary neuroendocrine cells act like sensor to orchestrate immune response

An uncommon and little-studied type of cell in the lungs has been found to act like a sensor, linking the pulmonary and central nervous systems to regulate immune response in reaction to environmental cues. [More]
New class of sound wave could lead to revolution in stem cell therapy

New class of sound wave could lead to revolution in stem cell therapy

Acoustics experts have created a new class of sound wave - the first in more than half a century - in a breakthrough they hope could lead to a revolution in stem cell therapy. [More]
Case Western scientist to lead a pair of studies to develop more effective treatment for CF

Case Western scientist to lead a pair of studies to develop more effective treatment for CF

A scientist at Case Western Reserve University Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing will lead a pair of studies to develop more effective treatment for symptoms of cystic fibrosis (CF), a life-threatening genetic disease that causes persistent lung infections and progressively limits the ability to breathe. [More]
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