Cytokines News and Research RSS Feed - Cytokines News and Research

Cytokine is a substance that is made by cells of the immune system. Some cytokines can boost the immune response and others can suppress it. Cytokines can also be made in the laboratory by recombinant DNA technology and used in the treatment of various diseases, including cancer.
Scientists discover DNA vaccine that alleviates chronic inflammation in the body

Scientists discover DNA vaccine that alleviates chronic inflammation in the body

An international team of scientists including CureLab Oncology, Inc. (Boston), University of Camerino (Italy), and Boston University have serendipitously discovered a DNA vaccine, which systemically alleviates chronic inflammation in the body. Since osteoporosis is an inflammatory disease, preventive and therapeutic effects of the new vaccine were demonstrated on mouse models with osteoporosis. [More]
Study results pave way for new clinical trial for glioblastoma patients

Study results pave way for new clinical trial for glioblastoma patients

Immune cells engineered to seek out and attack a type of deadly brain cancer were found to be both safe and effective at controlling tumor growth in mice that were treated with these modified cells, according to a study published in Science Translational Medicine by a team from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and the Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research. [More]
IL-23 predicts PegIFN response in chronic HBV

IL-23 predicts PegIFN response in chronic HBV

High baseline serum levels of interleukin-23 can help to identify hepatitis B e antigen-positive chronic hepatitis B patients who are likely to respond to pegylated interferon treatment, a Chinese study indicates. [More]
Corticosteroids decrease treatment failure among patients with community-acquired pneumonia

Corticosteroids decrease treatment failure among patients with community-acquired pneumonia

Among patients with severe community-acquired pneumonia and high initial inflammatory response, the use of the corticosteroid methylprednisolone decreased treatment failure, compared with placebo, according to a study in the February 17 issue of JAMA. [More]
Magnetizing biomolecules: an interview with Dr. Fred Whipple, AMSBIO

Magnetizing biomolecules: an interview with Dr. Fred Whipple, AMSBIO

Nanoparticle technology was originally developed in the 1980s and 1990s. As the technology evolved, it soon became possible to produce uniform nanoscopic beads that are magnetic, and that also have a variety of specific surface chemistries. It was immediately evident that such beads could be used to great advantage for biochemical separations. [More]
CWRU researcher receives $3.9 million grant for HIV research

CWRU researcher receives $3.9 million grant for HIV research

A researcher at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine has been awarded $3.9 million to determine if the combination of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and drug abuse is a double kick in the gut, leading to organ damage throughout the body. [More]
New compound may lead to development of potential therapeutics for neuropathic pain

New compound may lead to development of potential therapeutics for neuropathic pain

A new compound discovered by a team of UC Davis investigators has potent actions against production of a chemical that which is implicated in the development of chronic pain following a peripheral nerve injury in the spinal cord. [More]
Research findings demonstrate new approach to transform behavior of tumor cells

Research findings demonstrate new approach to transform behavior of tumor cells

Inserting a specific strain of bacteria into the microenvironment of aggressive ovarian cancer transforms the behavior of tumor cells from suppression to immunostimulation, researchers at Norris Cotton Cancer Center and the Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth have found. [More]
Upregulating heme-oxygenase with hemin helps improve pericardial adipocyte morphology, function

Upregulating heme-oxygenase with hemin helps improve pericardial adipocyte morphology, function

Scientists at the University of Saskatchewan College of Medicine, Department of Physiology, Saskatoon, Canada, led by Dr. Joseph Fomusi Ndisang have determined that upregulating heme-oxygenase with hemin improves pericardial adipocyte morphology and function. [More]
Researchers uncover mechanism by which anti-inflammatory processes may cause Alzheimer's

Researchers uncover mechanism by which anti-inflammatory processes may cause Alzheimer's

Inflammation has long been studied in Alzheimer's, but in a counterintuitive finding reported in a new paper, University of Florida researchers have uncovered the mechanism by which anti-inflammatory processes may trigger the disease. [More]
Findings may lead to novel therapeutic approaches to prevent fibrosis in Crohn's disease patients

Findings may lead to novel therapeutic approaches to prevent fibrosis in Crohn's disease patients

A natural protein made by immune cells may limit fibrosis and scarring in colitis, according to research published in the inaugural issue of Cellular and Molecular Gastroenterology and Hepatology, the new basic science journal of the American Gastroenterological Association. [More]
New article discusses role of cytokines in breast cancer development, progression

New article discusses role of cytokines in breast cancer development, progression

Emerging data on the role of inflammation and the immune system in the development, growth, and spread of breast tumors have focused increased attention on the role cytokines such as interleukin and transforming growth factor-β play in breast cancer initiation, protection, and metastasis. [More]
Intrexon and ZIOPHARM Oncology sign exclusive licensing agreement with MD Anderson

Intrexon and ZIOPHARM Oncology sign exclusive licensing agreement with MD Anderson

Intrexon Corporation, a leader in synthetic biology and its oncology partner, ZIOPHARM Oncology, today announced a broad exclusive licensing agreement with The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, including an exclusive sublicensing agreement through MD Anderson for intellectual property developed at the University of Minnesota for the development of non-viral adoptive cellular cancer immunotherapies. [More]
Study finds difference between results from IHC and quantitative molecular techniques

Study finds difference between results from IHC and quantitative molecular techniques

The cause of type 1 diabetes remains unknown. Several studies using immunohistochemistry (IHC) have independently reported hyperexpression of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I on pancreatic islet cells in young patients with recent-onset type 1 diabetes. Investigators have therefore suggested that HLA hyperexpression may be an important first step in the development of type 1 diabetes. [More]
Real-time RT-PCR TaqMan assay helps differentiate active pulmonary TB from LTBI

Real-time RT-PCR TaqMan assay helps differentiate active pulmonary TB from LTBI

One of the roadblocks to the eradication of tuberculosis (TB) is the difficulty in identifying patients with latent TB infections (LTBI). Neither the tuberculin skin test (TST) nor interferon-gamma release assays (IGRAs) are capable of distinguishing active from latent infection or predicting the chance of reactivation. [More]
FDA receives IDE application for CytoSorbents' CytoSorb cardiac surgery trial

FDA receives IDE application for CytoSorbents' CytoSorb cardiac surgery trial

CytoSorbents Corporation, a critical care immunotherapy company commercializing its CytoSorb® extracorporeal cytokine adsorber to reduce deadly inflammation in critically-ill and cardiac surgery patients, announced today that it has submitted an Investigational Device Exemption (IDE) application to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to conduct its proposed clinical trial using CytoSorb® intra-operatively in patients undergoing complex cardiac surgery requiring the use of a heart-lung machine. [More]
Study finds that binge drinking can significantly disrupt immune system

Study finds that binge drinking can significantly disrupt immune system

Binge drinking in young, healthy adults significantly disrupts the immune system, according to a study led by a researcher now at Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine. [More]
CytoSorbents starts trading on The Nasdaq Capital Market

CytoSorbents starts trading on The Nasdaq Capital Market

CytoSorbents Corporation, a critical care immunotherapy company commercializing its CytoSorb® extracorporeal cytokine adsorber to reduce deadly inflammation in critically-ill and cardiac surgery patients, announced that it will commence trading today on The Nasdaq Capital Market under its current ticker symbol "CTSO". [More]
Trophoblasts respond to inflammatory danger signals, find NTNU researchers

Trophoblasts respond to inflammatory danger signals, find NTNU researchers

Trophoblasts, cells that form an outer layer around a fertilized egg and develop into the major part of the placenta, have now been shown to respond to inflammatory danger signals, researchers from Norwegian University of Science and Technology found in a recent study published in Journal of Reproductive Immunology December 2014. [More]
Arthritis drug baricitinib meets primary endpoint in Phase 3 RA-BEACON study

Arthritis drug baricitinib meets primary endpoint in Phase 3 RA-BEACON study

Eli Lilly and Company and Incyte Corporation today announce that the Phase 3 RA-BEACON study of the investigational medicine baricitinib met its primary endpoint of improved ACR20 response compared to placebo after 12 weeks of treatment. [More]