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DNA methylation is a type of chemical modification of DNA that can be inherited and subsequently removed without changing the original DNA sequence. As such, it is part of the epigenetic code and is also the most well characterized epigenetic mechanism.
Study reveals association between DNA methylation and type 2 diabetes

Study reveals association between DNA methylation and type 2 diabetes

Researchers from the Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute have found an epigenetic mechanism implicated in the regulation of blood sugar. The study, published in the journal Molecular Human Genetics, reveals that the methylation of the TXNIP gene is associated with diabetes mellitus type 2 and, in particular, average blood glucose levels. [More]
Prenatal stress affects babies' health in war-torn areas

Prenatal stress affects babies' health in war-torn areas

Children from war-torn areas of the globe are affected by trauma even before they are born, according to a new University of Florida study. [More]
Maternal diet during pregnancy and lactation leads to epigenetic changes in offspring

Maternal diet during pregnancy and lactation leads to epigenetic changes in offspring

As the study shows, a high-fat diet during pregnancy and lactation leads to epigenetic changes in the offspring. These changes affect metabolic pathways regulated by the gut hormone GIP, whereby the adult offspring are more susceptible to obesity and insulin resistance, the precursor to type 2 diabetes. Similar mechanisms cannot be ruled out in humans, according to Pfeiffer. [More]
UCL-led researchers find way to assess viability of induced pluripotent stem cells

UCL-led researchers find way to assess viability of induced pluripotent stem cells

A research team led by scientists from UCL have found a way to assess the viability of 'manufactured' stem cells known as induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Published today in Nature Communications, the team's discovery offers a new way to fast-track screening methods used in stem cell research. [More]
Multinational study suggests new way to classify gliomas

Multinational study suggests new way to classify gliomas

A comprehensive analysis of the molecular characteristics of gliomas—the most common malignant brain tumor—explains why some patients diagnosed with slow-growing (low-grade) tumors quickly succumb to the disease while others with more aggressive (high-grade) tumors survive for many years. [More]
Study provides detailed new information about diffuse glioma

Study provides detailed new information about diffuse glioma

An international collaborative study has revealed detailed new information about diffuse glioma, the most common type of tumor found in some 80 percent of adult brain cancer patients, raising hopes that better understanding of these disease groups may aid improved clinical outcomes. [More]
DNA imprinting defect may affect children diagnosed with osteosarcoma

DNA imprinting defect may affect children diagnosed with osteosarcoma

Children diagnosed with osteosarcoma may be impacted by a DNA imprinting defect also found in parents, according to new research from the Masonic Cancer Center, University of Minnesota. DNA imprinting is a phenomenon in which just one of the two inherited genes is active while the other is present but inactive. [More]
MDxHealth recognized with 2015 Global Frost & Sullivan Award for Technology Innovation

MDxHealth recognized with 2015 Global Frost & Sullivan Award for Technology Innovation

Based on its recent analysis of the prostate cancer diagnostics market, Frost & Sullivan recognizes MDxHealth with the 2015 Global Frost & Sullivan Award for Technology Innovation. To advance molecular diagnostic tests for urological cancers, MDxHealth supplemented its prostate cancer test, ConfirmMDx, with a urine-based "liquid-biopsy" test called SelectMDx. [More]
Researchers reveal totally new biological mechanism that underlies cancer

Researchers reveal totally new biological mechanism that underlies cancer

In a landmark study, researchers from the Broad Institute and Massachusetts General Hospital reveal a completely new biological mechanism that underlies cancer. By studying brain tumors that carry mutations in the isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) genes, the team uncovered some unusual changes in the instructions for how the genome folds up on itself. [More]
IMB scientists identify two proteins vital for demethylation of DNA

IMB scientists identify two proteins vital for demethylation of DNA

Scientists at the Institute of Molecular Biology in Mainz have identified a missing piece of the puzzle in understanding how epigenetic marks are removed from DNA. The research on DNA demethylation sheds new light on a fundamental process that is important in development and diseases such as cancer. [More]
New study sheds light on the molecular basis of memory and learning

New study sheds light on the molecular basis of memory and learning

The brain still harbours many unknowns. Basically, it is assumed that it stores experiences by altering the connections between brain cells. This ability to adapt - which is also called "plasticity" - provides the basis for memory and learning, which is the ability to draw conclusions from memories. On a molecular scale these changes are mediated by modifications of expression of specific genes that as required strengthen or weaken the connections between the brain cells. [More]
TET proteins needed to maintain genome instability, say researchers

TET proteins needed to maintain genome instability, say researchers

Members of the TET (short for ten-eleven translocation) family have been known to function as tumor suppressors for many years, but how they keep a lid on the uncontrolled cell proliferation of cancer cells had remained uncertain. Now, researchers at the La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology demonstrate that TET proteins collectively constitute a major class of tumor suppressors and are required to maintain genome instability. [More]
UC San Diego researchers awarded MJFF grant to identify biomarkers for Parkinson's disease

UC San Diego researchers awarded MJFF grant to identify biomarkers for Parkinson's disease

Parkinson's disease is difficult to diagnose, particularly in its early stages. Now, researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine - aided by a $375,000 grant from The Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson's Research - hope to improve the prospects of early diagnosis by identifying a biological signpost in the blood. [More]
DNA sequence variation can influence gene activity in developing human brain

DNA sequence variation can influence gene activity in developing human brain

An international research collaboration has shed new light on how DNA sequence variation can influence gene activity in the developing human brain. [More]
Research brings scientists closer to understanding mechanisms underlying genomic imprinting process

Research brings scientists closer to understanding mechanisms underlying genomic imprinting process

Research led by Dr. Keiji Tanimoto from the University of Tsukuba, Japan, has brought us closer to understanding the mechanisms underlying the phenomenon of genomic imprinting. [More]
Prenatal smoking exposure can potentially affect someone's health for years after birth

Prenatal smoking exposure can potentially affect someone's health for years after birth

New Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health-led research finds that blood taken from children up to the age of five contains molecular evidence about whether their mothers smoked during pregnancy. [More]
Researchers team up to evaluate biological and genetic differences of GI cancers in race, ethnicity

Researchers team up to evaluate biological and genetic differences of GI cancers in race, ethnicity

Americans of African descent are at a significantly higher risk for developing and dying from Gastrointestinal (GI) cancers, which include colorectal and pancreatic cancers, compared to individuals who are of Caucasian descent. [More]
How important is a mother’s diet before pregnancy? An interview with Dr Matt Silver

How important is a mother’s diet before pregnancy? An interview with Dr Matt Silver

In humans, much is already known about the impact of maternal undernutrition during pregnancy, and its impact on growth, development and disease throughout the life course. However, until recently little was known about the effects of the nutritional environment around the time of conception. [More]
Leading cancer researchers address eight 'big questions'

Leading cancer researchers address eight 'big questions'

Leading cancer researchers address eight of the "big questions" facing the field as part of the inaugural issue of Trends in Cancer, published by Cell Press. [More]
New tools to measure S-Adenosylmethionine (SAM) and methylation index

New tools to measure S-Adenosylmethionine (SAM) and methylation index

AMSBIO has launched a unique series of monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies against S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) and S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) that allows immunoassays to be used in methylation regulation research. [More]
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