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DNA replication, the basis for biological inheritance, is a fundamental process occurring in all living organisms to copy their DNA. This process is "semiconservative" in that each strand of the original double-stranded DNA molecule serves as template for the reproduction of the complementary strand. Hence, following DNA replication, two identical DNA molecules have been produced from a single double-stranded DNA molecule. Cellular proofreading and error-checking mechanisms ensure near perfect fidelity for DNA replication.
Researchers show importance of DNA damage in fine tuning of innate immune system

Researchers show importance of DNA damage in fine tuning of innate immune system

For the first time scientists from Umeå University show the importance of DNA damage in fine tuning of our innate immune system and hence the ability to mount the optimal inflammatory response to infections and other biological dangers. [More]
Researchers reveal why many African-American women are diagnosed with deadly forms of breast cancer

Researchers reveal why many African-American women are diagnosed with deadly forms of breast cancer

Researchers have uncovered new information that may begin to explain why many African-American women are more likely to be diagnosed with aggressive, often deadly forms of breast cancer, which strengthens the evidence that increased dietary folate intake may prove to be an effective strategy for reducing risk for the disease in African-American women. [More]
New insight on how naturally occurring mutations can be introduced into DNA

New insight on how naturally occurring mutations can be introduced into DNA

Scientists have shed light on how naturally occurring mutations can be introduced into our DNA. [More]
Researchers develop new treatment that extends telomeres

Researchers develop new treatment that extends telomeres

Will extending telomeres lead to longer, healthier lives? Researchers have taken an important step toward answering this question by developing a new treatment used in the laboratory that extends telomeres. [More]
ASCB honors UTSA adjunct professor with E. B. Wilson Medal

ASCB honors UTSA adjunct professor with E. B. Wilson Medal

William Brinkley, adjunct professor of biology in the UTSA College of Sciences, was recently honored with the E. B. Wilson Medal from the American Society for Cell Biology. The medal, the organization's highest honor for far-reaching contributions to cell biology over a lifetime in science, was presented to Brinkley at the 54th Annual Meeting in Philadelphia. [More]
Using HIV drugs to treat AMD: an interview with Dr Mark Young

Using HIV drugs to treat AMD: an interview with Dr Mark Young

NRTIs are compounds which were originally developed in the 1960s as anti-cancer agents. They are similar in structure to the bases which make up DNA, and it was hoped that they would interfere with DNA replication in fast-growing cancer cells, slowing down or stopping tumour growth. [More]
SLU investigators find promising candidates for new herpes virus treatments

SLU investigators find promising candidates for new herpes virus treatments

Saint Louis University research findings published in the December issue of Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy report a family of molecules known as nucleotidyltransferase superfamily (NTS) enzyme inhibitors are promising candidates for new herpes virus treatments. [More]
Added benefit of daclatasvir drug not proven for chronic hepatitis C infection

Added benefit of daclatasvir drug not proven for chronic hepatitis C infection

The drug daclatasvir (trade name Daklinza) has been available since August 2014 for the treatment of adults with chronic hepatitis C (CHC) infection. The German Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care examined in a dossier assessment whether this new drug offers an added benefit over the appropriate comparator therapy. [More]
MIT engineers create new computer model to design complex 3-D DNA shapes

MIT engineers create new computer model to design complex 3-D DNA shapes

MIT biological engineers have created a new computer model that allows them to design the most complex three-dimensional DNA shapes ever produced, including rings, bowls, and geometric structures such as icosahedrons that resemble viral particles. [More]
Tufts University study explores relationship between transcription, expansions of DNA repeats

Tufts University study explores relationship between transcription, expansions of DNA repeats

Researchers in human genetics have known that long nucleotide repeats in DNA lead to instability of the genome and ultimately to human hereditary diseases such Freidreich's ataxia and Huntington's disease. [More]
Scientists map DNA replication process at the most fundamental level

Scientists map DNA replication process at the most fundamental level

The proteins that drive DNA replication—the force behind cellular growth and reproduction—are some of the most complex machines on Earth. [More]
SOFIE BIOSCIENCES awarded NCI Phase II SBIR contract to develop [18F]FAC PET

SOFIE BIOSCIENCES awarded NCI Phase II SBIR contract to develop [18F]FAC PET

SOFIE BIOSCIENCES, a leader in the field of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging, including probes, scanners, and chemistry systems, announced today that the National Cancer Institute has awarded the company a Phase II Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract for approximately $1.5M over two years. [More]
Researchers reveal how alteration of single nucleotide could initiate fragile X syndrome

Researchers reveal how alteration of single nucleotide could initiate fragile X syndrome

Researchers reveal how the alteration of a single nucleotide—the basic building block of DNA—could initiate fragile X syndrome, the most common inherited form of intellectual disability. The study appears in The Journal of Cell Biology. [More]
Study reveals intricate mechanisms involved in enzyme that governs DNA duplication

Study reveals intricate mechanisms involved in enzyme that governs DNA duplication

In a study published today in Genes & Development, Dr Christian Speck from the MRC Clinical Sciences Centre's DNA Replication group, in collaboration with Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), New York, reveal the intricate mechanisms involved in the enzyme that governs DNA duplication during cell division. [More]
Identification of new molecular mechanism indicates new ways to block uncontrolled cell division

Identification of new molecular mechanism indicates new ways to block uncontrolled cell division

In a study published today in Genes & Development, Dr Christian Speck from the MRC Clinical Sciences Centre's DNA Replication group, in collaboration with Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), New York, reveal the intricate mechanisms involved in the enzyme that governs DNA duplication during cell division. [More]
Scientists reveal structure of protein involved in life and development of cancer

Scientists reveal structure of protein involved in life and development of cancer

Scientists reveal the structure of one of the most important and complicated proteins in cell division - a fundamental process in life and the development of cancer - in research published in Nature today (Sunday). [More]
Researchers discover new way by which metabolism is linked to regulation of DNA

Researchers discover new way by which metabolism is linked to regulation of DNA

A research team at the Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry at the University of Alberta have discovered a new way by which metabolism is linked to the regulation of DNA, the basis of our genetic code. The findings may have important implications for the understanding of many common diseases, including cancer. [More]
Yap1 oncogene drives recurrence and progression of pancreatic cancer

Yap1 oncogene drives recurrence and progression of pancreatic cancer

Pancreatic cancer tumors addicted to mutant Kras signaling for their growth and progression have a ready-made substitute to tap if they're ever forced to go cold-turkey on the mutant oncogene, scientists at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center report in the journal Cell. [More]
Research finding paves way for targeted approaches to treating cancer patients

Research finding paves way for targeted approaches to treating cancer patients

Twelve years ago, UNC School of Medicine researcher Brian Strahl, PhD, found that a protein called Set2 plays a role in how yeast genes are expressed - specifically how DNA gets transcribed into messenger RNA. Now his lab has found that Set2 is also a major player in DNA repair, a complicated and crucial process that can lead to the development of cancer cells if the repair goes wrong. [More]
Study suggests new targets for treating rare genetic disorder and cancer

Study suggests new targets for treating rare genetic disorder and cancer

The combined action of two enzymes, Srs2 and Exo1, prevents and repairs common genetic mutations in growing yeast cells, according to a new study led by scientists at NYU Langone Medical Center. [More]