Defibrillator News and Research RSS Feed - Defibrillator News and Research

An implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) is a small device that's placed in your chest or abdomen. This device uses electrical pulses or shocks to help control life-threatening, irregular heartbeats, especially those that could lead the heart to suddenly stop beating (sudden cardiac arrest). If the heart stops beating, blood stops flowing to the brain and other vital organs. This usually causes death if it's not treated in minutes.
Study evaluates effectiveness of robotic approach over manual ablation in treating heart arrhythmia

Study evaluates effectiveness of robotic approach over manual ablation in treating heart arrhythmia

Whether ablation of the highest-risk heart arrhythmia is best handled by a robot or the hands of an electrophysiologist should be answered by an international comparison of the two. [More]
Study finds link between respiratory sinus arrhythmia and survival prospects of heart attack patients

Study finds link between respiratory sinus arrhythmia and survival prospects of heart attack patients

The heart rate may be an indicator of a person's life expectancy. A research team at the Technical University of Munich has to this end analyzed an effect which at first seems paradoxical: Minor irregularities in the heartbeat are indicative of a healthy body. [More]
New experimental model may predict eventual cardiac phenotype in pediatric patients

New experimental model may predict eventual cardiac phenotype in pediatric patients

An experimental model uses genetics-guided biomechanics and patient-derived stem cells to predict what type of inherited heart defect a child will develop, according to authors of a new study in the journal Cell. [More]
Non-invasive 3-D virtual heart assessment tool can help predict arrhythmia risk in patients

Non-invasive 3-D virtual heart assessment tool can help predict arrhythmia risk in patients

When electrical waves in the heart run amok in a condition called arrhythmia, sudden death can occur. To save the life of a patient at risk, doctors currently implant a small defibrillator to sense the onset of arrhythmia and jolt the heart back to a normal rhythm. [More]
New set of practice guidelines from WMS may help in treatment, prevention of drowning

New set of practice guidelines from WMS may help in treatment, prevention of drowning

Drowning is a global threat to human health. Each year, more than 372,000 people die as a result of drowning, with many of those deaths being preventable by simple water safety measures. In order to arm professionals with the most up-to-date clinical protocols, the Wilderness Medical Society has issued a new set of practice guidelines for both the treatment and prevention of drowning, published in the society's official journal, Wilderness and Environmental Medicine. [More]
Advances in telemedicine: an interview with Dr Ameet Bakhai

Advances in telemedicine: an interview with Dr Ameet Bakhai

Telemedicine is the art of improving patient care via managing data remotely, and in this spirit one of the earliest examples often not considered in this category, would be the permanent pacemaker, first implanted into a human being in 1958. [More]
Resuscitation drugs along with defibrillation shocks can help stabilize heart beat after cardiac arrest

Resuscitation drugs along with defibrillation shocks can help stabilize heart beat after cardiac arrest

Administering heart resuscitation drugs to patients whose cardiac arrest is witnessed at the time of the attack can improve survival, but needs to be done through an IV line rather than directly into bone marrow as is more commonly done by paramedics, a new study involving UT Southwestern Medical Center emergency physicians and Dallas-Fort Worth Emergency Medical Services agencies reveals. [More]
Study elucidates potential benefits of antiarrhythmic drugs for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients

Study elucidates potential benefits of antiarrhythmic drugs for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients

Paramedics often give heart rhythm stabilizing drugs to patients who are suffering out-of-hospital cardiac arrest when they fail to regain a stable heart rhythm after electrical shock treatment. [More]
Loyola to conduct clinical trial of new procedure to treat atrial fibrillation

Loyola to conduct clinical trial of new procedure to treat atrial fibrillation

Loyola Medicine is enrolling patients in a landmark clinical trial of a new procedure to treat atrial fibrillation, the most common type of irregular heartbeat. [More]
Boston Scientific gets FDA approval for ACUITY X4 Quadripolar Left Ventricular leads

Boston Scientific gets FDA approval for ACUITY X4 Quadripolar Left Ventricular leads

Boston Scientific has received U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval for the ACUITY X4 Quadripolar Left Ventricular (LV) leads. The FDA approval of the quadripolar leads, the wires that connect cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) devices to the heart, marks the first time the company will offer a full X4 CRT system – both the device and the leads – to the U.S. market. [More]
MRI safe for patients with implantable cardiac devices

MRI safe for patients with implantable cardiac devices

The findings of a major study led by cardiovascular imaging specialists at Allegheny General Hospital, part of the Allegheny Health Network, suggest that magnetic resonance imaging is a safe and effective diagnostic procedure for patients with implantable cardiac devices. [More]
New study finds that living in high-rise buildings may affect survival after cardiac arrest

New study finds that living in high-rise buildings may affect survival after cardiac arrest

The number of people living in high-rise buildings in rising, but along with the convenience and panoramic views of a downtown condo comes a risk: a new study found that survival rates from cardiac arrest decrease the higher up the building a person lives. [More]
Cedars-Sinai researcher receives $2.5 million grant to develop risk assessment tool for sudden cardiac arrest

Cedars-Sinai researcher receives $2.5 million grant to develop risk assessment tool for sudden cardiac arrest

A Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute physician researcher has received a $2.5 million grant from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute to develop a risk assessment tool that could identify patients susceptible to sudden cardiac arrest, a usually fatal heart rhythm malfunction. [More]
Rani Therapeutics, MedImmune collaborate to evaluate novel oral drug delivery platform

Rani Therapeutics, MedImmune collaborate to evaluate novel oral drug delivery platform

Rani Therapeutics announced today that it has entered into a collaboration with MedImmune, the global biologics research and development arm of AstraZeneca, to evaluate Rani's novel oral drug delivery platform. The companies have agreed to conduct feasibility studies over the next two years, in which Rani will test select biologic molecules in the area of metabolic disease to evaluate the oral delivery of these molecules. [More]
Pacemaker Induced Transient Asynchrony could help slow down progression of heart failure

Pacemaker Induced Transient Asynchrony could help slow down progression of heart failure

Johns Hopkins has demonstrated in animals that applying a pacemaker's mild electrical shocks to push the heart in and out of normal synchronized contraction for part of each day may be an effective way to slow down the progression of heart failure, a disorder that afflicts millions of Americans. [More]
LifeVest wearable cardioverter defibrillator approved for children at risk for sudden cardiac arrest

LifeVest wearable cardioverter defibrillator approved for children at risk for sudden cardiac arrest

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved a new indication for the LifeVest wearable cardioverter defibrillator. The LifeVest is approved for certain children who are at risk for sudden cardiac arrest, but are not candidates for an implantable defibrillator due to certain medical conditions or lack of parental consent. [More]
Advances in leadless pacing: an interview with Dr. Reddy

Advances in leadless pacing: an interview with Dr. Reddy

Pacemakers have been around for a very long time, they're great devices, critical for many people who have slow heartbeats. While they're very effective, they have some issues. There are two main aspects relating to these issues. [More]
Researchers identify factors that increase risk of cardiac arrest during pediatric spine surgeries

Researchers identify factors that increase risk of cardiac arrest during pediatric spine surgeries

Although the vast majority of pediatric spine surgeries are safe, a handful of neuromuscular conditions seem to fuel the risk of cardiac arrest during such operations, according to research led by investigators at the Johns Hopkins Children's Center. [More]
Isosorbide mononitrate does not increase HFpEF patients' daily activity level

Isosorbide mononitrate does not increase HFpEF patients' daily activity level

Heart failure patients with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) -- where the heart becomes stiff and cannot relax or fill properly -- did not have increased exercise tolerance after taking isosorbide mononitrate, compared to a placebo, according to a study presented today at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2015. [More]
ACC's public reporting program provides information about hospitals' performance

ACC's public reporting program provides information about hospitals' performance

Heart disease patients and their caregivers can now search for in-depth data about their local hospitals and make informed decisions about their care through the American College of Cardiology's public reporting program. The first data release includes information about hospitals' performance in prescribing appropriate medication at hospital discharge. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement