Dehydration News and Research RSS Feed - Dehydration News and Research

Dehydration is a condition caused by the loss of too much water from the body. Severe diarrhea or vomiting can cause dehydration.
Health tips to keep children safe and active in summer heat

Health tips to keep children safe and active in summer heat

During the dog days of summer, when temperatures are holding steady around 90 degrees, it can be easy to let your children sit in front of the television while enjoying the cool of the air conditioning. [More]
Sickle cell trait may not increase mortality risk

Sickle cell trait may not increase mortality risk

People who carry a gene for sickle cell disease do not appear to be at an increased risk of premature death, according to a study by researchers from Stanford University School of Medicine. [More]
Study assesses effects of dehydration on cricket-specific skills

Study assesses effects of dehydration on cricket-specific skills

Scientists from the University of Stirling have discovered that dehydrated cricket players suffer impaired motor skills that significantly reduce their performance on the field. [More]
Wearable sensor system could help detect lactate levels in perspiration

Wearable sensor system could help detect lactate levels in perspiration

It may be clammy and inconvenient, but human sweat has at least one positive characteristic - it can give insight to what's happening inside your body. [More]
Study shows continuous dehydration kills cells during dry preservation

Study shows continuous dehydration kills cells during dry preservation

A new finding in experiments studying the dry preservation of living cells -- a potentially revolutionary alternative to cryopreservation - has defined a clear limit where continuing dehydration kills cells. [More]
Pediatric health educator provides tips for protecting children from heat stroke

Pediatric health educator provides tips for protecting children from heat stroke

Hot temperatures and high humidity can put nearly anyone at risk for dehydration and heat stroke, but children are especially vulnerable. [More]
Pediatric endocrinologist outlines top summertime tips for kids with Type 1 diabetes

Pediatric endocrinologist outlines top summertime tips for kids with Type 1 diabetes

For kids, the perfect summer can mean sleeping in, eating whenever hunger strikes, playing outdoors in the sun, swimming and staying up late. But for children with Type 1 diabetes, all of the above, and the general lack of schedule, can wreak havoc with their blood sugar levels. [More]
High levels of zinc may lead to kidney stone formation

High levels of zinc may lead to kidney stone formation

David Killilea, PhD, a staff scientist at Children's Hospital Oakland Research Institute- the research arm of UCSF Benioff Children's Hospital Oakland - co-authored a study into the causes of kidney stones. [More]
Searing temperatures can be inherently dangerous to vulnerable children, older adults

Searing temperatures can be inherently dangerous to vulnerable children, older adults

The searing, record-setting temperatures in the West and Southwest United States flared a warning that extreme heat could be commonplace across much of the country this summer. [More]
FDA approves Vaxchora for prevention of cholera

FDA approves Vaxchora for prevention of cholera

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Vaxchora, a vaccine for the prevention of cholera caused by serogroup O1 in adults 18 through 64 years of age traveling to cholera-affected areas. Vaxchora is the only FDA-approved vaccine for the prevention of cholera. [More]
Understanding DNA scrunching could help develop novel ways to fight infections

Understanding DNA scrunching could help develop novel ways to fight infections

Evidence of DNA "scrunching" may one day lead to a new class of drugs against viruses, according to a research team from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, the Georgia Institute of Technology, and Columbia University. [More]
Drinking soft drinks to rehydrate worsens dehydration-related kidney injury

Drinking soft drinks to rehydrate worsens dehydration-related kidney injury

Repeated heat-related dehydration has been associated with increased risk of chronic kidney damage in mice. A new study in rats published in the American Journal of Physiology—Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology reports that drinking soft drinks to rehydrate worsened dehydration and kidney injury. [More]
Scientists examine how common beverages affect people's hydration levels

Scientists examine how common beverages affect people's hydration levels

Scientists at the universities of Stirling, Loughborough and Bangor are calling for the creation of a beverage hydration index to help people understand how different drinks can keep you hydrated. [More]
Simple tips to reduce pain from sunburn

Simple tips to reduce pain from sunburn

The British Skin Foundation has sun safety tips available to the public on this page and our primary advice is to follow these to avoid sunburn in the first place. However, we realise that sometimes accidents can happen. [More]
Pocket ultrasound device helps health personnel detect early signs of dehydration or heart failure

Pocket ultrasound device helps health personnel detect early signs of dehydration or heart failure

Detecting fluid retention in patients early is important to prevent their heart failure from getting worse. Nurses who are trained in the use of handheld pocket ultrasound devices can dispense diuretic drugs more precisely. [More]
Rotavirus vaccine program reduces hospitalization rates by more than 70% in Ontario

Rotavirus vaccine program reduces hospitalization rates by more than 70% in Ontario

Hospitalization for rotavirus infections decreased by > 70% following the introduction of a vaccine program in Ontario, Canada, according to a study published May 11, 2016 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Sarah Wilson from Public Health Ontario and the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences, Canada, and colleagues. [More]
Climate change may be key factor for increasing rates of chronic kidney disease

Climate change may be key factor for increasing rates of chronic kidney disease

Climate change may be accelerating rates of chronic kidney disease caused by dehydration and heat stress, according to research appearing in an upcoming issue of the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. [More]
Children infected with Cryptosporidium parasite more likely to suffer from stunted growth

Children infected with Cryptosporidium parasite more likely to suffer from stunted growth

Children infected even just once with a certain type of waterborne parasite are nearly three times as likely to suffer from moderate or severe stunted growth by the age of two than those who are not - regardless of whether their infection made them feel sick, new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health-led research suggests. [More]
Half-strength apple juice followed by preferred fluid choice better for treating kids with mild gastroenteritis

Half-strength apple juice followed by preferred fluid choice better for treating kids with mild gastroenteritis

Children with mild gastroenteritis and minimal dehydration experienced fewer treatment failures such as IV rehydration or hospitalization when offered half-strength apple juice followed by their preferred fluid choice compared with children who received electrolyte maintenance solution to replace fluid losses, according to a study published online by JAMA. The study is being released to coincide with its presentation at the Pediatric Academic Societies meeting. [More]
Study discusses adequacy of fluid intake for replacing meaningful water losses

Study discusses adequacy of fluid intake for replacing meaningful water losses

A study from the Journal of the American College of Nutrition (JACN) discusses fluid intake adequacy in detail and a simple tool is reviewed that may help healthy, active, low-risk populations answer the question, "Am I drinking enough?" The article "Am I Drinking Enough? Yes, No, and Maybe" by Samuel N. Cheuvront PhD, RD and Robert W. Kenefick PhD is made available with Free Access in JACN Issue 35(2) 2016, the official publication of the American College of Nutrition. [More]
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