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Dehydration is a condition caused by the loss of too much water from the body. Severe diarrhea or vomiting can cause dehydration.
New Johns Hopkins-led research suggests risk factors for developing acute kidney injury

New Johns Hopkins-led research suggests risk factors for developing acute kidney injury

Physicians treating hospitalized patients for conditions unrelated to the kidneys should pay close attention to common blood and urine tests for kidney function in order to prevent incidental injury to the organs that help cleanse the body of toxins, new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health-led research suggests. [More]
Amgen's Vectibix (panitumumab) receives EC approval for treatment patients with WT RAS mCRC

Amgen's Vectibix (panitumumab) receives EC approval for treatment patients with WT RAS mCRC

Amgen today announced that the European Commission approved a new use of Vectibix (panitumumab) as first-line treatment in combination with FOLFIRI for the treatment of adult patients with wild-type (WT) RAS metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). [More]

Ebola more likely to be fatal for young children

Ebola progresses more quickly and is more likely to be fatal for children under five, according to new research. An international group of scientists led by Imperial College London and the World Health Organization analysed data on Ebola cases in children under 16 during the current outbreak in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone, comparing them to cases in adults. [More]
Glyxambi for Type 2 diabetes treatment now available by prescription across the U.S.

Glyxambi for Type 2 diabetes treatment now available by prescription across the U.S.

Glyxambi® (empagliflozin/linagliptin) tablets are now available by prescription in many leading chain and independent pharmacies across the U.S., including Walgreens and Rite Aid. [More]
New analysis of medieval cesspit in Jerusalem provides window into spread of infectious diseases

New analysis of medieval cesspit in Jerusalem provides window into spread of infectious diseases

A new analysis of a medieval cesspit in the Christian quarter of the old city of Jerusalem has revealed the presence of a number of ancient parasite eggs, providing a window into the nature and spread of infectious diseases in the Middle East during the 15th century. [More]
WHO calls for intensification of routine immunization services in all Ebola-affected areas

WHO calls for intensification of routine immunization services in all Ebola-affected areas

A growing risk of outbreaks of measles, pertussis, and other vaccine-preventable diseases in countries affected by Ebola must be countered by urgent scaling up of routine immunization activities, according to the World Health Organization. [More]
Duke researchers identify factors that correlate with repeat ER visits for kidney stones

Duke researchers identify factors that correlate with repeat ER visits for kidney stones

One in nine patients released from the emergency department after treatment for a kidney stone will face a repeat visit, according to findings by Duke Medicine researchers. [More]
New global study on Acute Kidney Injury (AKI) shows the way to eliminating preventable deaths by 2025 – early detection and management are key

New global study on Acute Kidney Injury (AKI) shows the way to eliminating preventable deaths by 2025 – early detection and management are key

The International Society of Nephrology (ISN) will present the findings of a new global study on Acute Kidney Injury (AKI), seen by experts as a key step forward in their efforts to eliminate preventable deaths from the condition by 2025 (0by25). [More]
Non-drug approaches work better in people with Alzheimer's disease, dementia

Non-drug approaches work better in people with Alzheimer's disease, dementia

Doctors write millions of prescriptions a year for drugs to calm the behavior of people with Alzheimer's disease and other types of dementia. But non-drug approaches actually work better, and carry far fewer risks, experts conclude in a new report. [More]
Eisai announces FDA approval of LENVIMA (lenvatinib) for treatment of RAI-refractory DTC

Eisai announces FDA approval of LENVIMA (lenvatinib) for treatment of RAI-refractory DTC

Eisai Inc. announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the company's receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor LENVIMA (lenvatinib) for the treatment of locally recurrent or metastatic, progressive, radioactive iodine-refractory differentiated thyroid cancer (RAI-R DTC). [More]
Synthetic Biologics reports positive results from SYN-004 Phase 1b trial to prevent C. difficile infection

Synthetic Biologics reports positive results from SYN-004 Phase 1b trial to prevent C. difficile infection

Synthetic Biologics, Inc., a developer of pathogen-specific therapies for serious infections and diseases, with a focus on protecting the microbiome, today announced positive topline safety and tolerability results from a Phase 1b clinical trial of SYN-004, the Company's investigational oral beta-lactamase enzyme designed to protect the microbiome and prevent Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) infection, antibiotic-associated diarrhea and secondary antibiotic-resistant infections in patients receiving intravenous (IV) beta-lactam antibiotic therapy. [More]
Readmissions after surgery associated with new postdischarge complications, shows study

Readmissions after surgery associated with new postdischarge complications, shows study

In a study that included readmission information from nearly 350 hospitals, readmissions the first 30 days after surgery were associated with new postdischarge complications related to the surgical procedure and not a worsening of any medical conditions the patient already had while hospitalized for surgery, according to a study in the February 3 issue of JAMA. [More]
Helsinn begins elsiglutide Phase IIB trial for prevention of chemotherapy-induced diarrhea

Helsinn begins elsiglutide Phase IIB trial for prevention of chemotherapy-induced diarrhea

Helsinn Healthcare S.A. and Zealand Pharma A/S jointly announce that Helsinn has started a Phase IIB clinical dose-finding trial of elsiglutide for the prevention of chemotherapy-induced diarrhea (CID). The first patients out of a planned total of 600 patients with colorectal cancer treated with chemotherapy have been dosed in the trial. [More]
Most hospital readmissions after surgery are not due to poor care coordination, finds new study

Most hospital readmissions after surgery are not due to poor care coordination, finds new study

A study from Northwestern Medicine and the American College of Surgeons published today in JAMA suggests that penalizing hospitals for patient readmissions following surgery may be ineffective, and even counterproductive, for improving the quality of hospital care in America. [More]
Study shows changes in kidney function among sugarcane workers in northwestern Nicaragua

Study shows changes in kidney function among sugarcane workers in northwestern Nicaragua

Sugarcane workers in northwestern Nicaragua experienced a decline in kidney function during the harvest, with field workers at greatest risk, suggesting that heat stress or other occupational factors may be playing a role in the high rates of chronic kidney disease in the region, a new study led by Boston University School of Public Health researchers shows. [More]
Johns Hopkins pediatricians offer guidelines on choosing between urgent care and ER

Johns Hopkins pediatricians offer guidelines on choosing between urgent care and ER

Parents have a natural tendency to fear the worst when it comes to their children and often opt for a "better safe than sorry" course of action, Canares says, but the truth is many situations don't warrant a trip to the emergency room. At the other end of the spectrum are cases that clearly require emergency attention but end up in urgent care instead — a less common scenario, Canares says. [More]
Antibiotic use by travellers may promote spread of drug-resistant 'super-bacteria'

Antibiotic use by travellers may promote spread of drug-resistant 'super-bacteria'

Treating travellers' diarrhoea with antibiotics can promote the spread of drug-resistant "super-bacteria". [More]
Taking antibiotics for diarrhea may put travelers at increased risk for contracting superbugs

Taking antibiotics for diarrhea may put travelers at increased risk for contracting superbugs

Taking antibiotics for diarrhea may put travelers visiting developing parts of the world at higher risk for contracting superbugs and spreading these daunting drug-resistant bacteria to their home countries, according to a new study published in Clinical Infectious Diseases and now available online. [More]
Almost 42% of US drinkers use alcohol-interactive prescription medications, study finds

Almost 42% of US drinkers use alcohol-interactive prescription medications, study finds

Approximately 71 percent of American adults drink alcohol. While alcohol interacts negatively with a number of commonly prescribed medications, little is known on a population level about the use of alcohol-interactive (AI) prescription medication among US drinkers. A new study has found that almost 42 percent of drinkers in the US population have used one or more alcohol-interactive prescription medications. [More]
FDA grants orphan drug status to NBI-77860 for treatment of congenital adrenal hyperplasia

FDA grants orphan drug status to NBI-77860 for treatment of congenital adrenal hyperplasia

Neurocrine Biosciences, Inc. announced today that NBI-77860, a proprietary corticotropin releasing factor 1 (CRF) receptor antagonist, has been granted orphan drug status by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) a disease that affects approximately 20,000-30,000 people in the United States. [More]
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