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Dengue (DF) and dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) are caused by one of four closely related, but antigenically distinct, virus serotypes (DEN-1, DEN-2, DEN-3, and DEN-4), of the genus Flavivirus. Infection with one of these serotypes provides immunity to only that serotype for life, so persons living in a dengue-endemic area can have more than one dengue infection during their lifetime. DF and DHF are primarily diseases of tropical and sub tropical areas, and the four different dengue serotypes are maintained in a cycle that involves humans and the Aedes mosquito. However, Aedes aegypti, a domestic, day-biting mosquito that prefers to feed on humans, is the most common Aedes species. Infections produce a spectrum of clinical illness ranging from a nonspecific viral syndrome to severe and fatal hemorrhagic disease. Important risk factors for DHF include the strain of the infecting virus, as well as the age, and especially the prior dengue infection history of the patient.
ESCMID gathers more solid data to better assess Zika virus risks, prepares for possible outbreak in Africa, Europe

ESCMID gathers more solid data to better assess Zika virus risks, prepares for possible outbreak in Africa, Europe

Experts at the European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases – an organization promoting research, risk assessment, knowledge sharing and best practices in the fight against infectious diseases – are developing tools to monitor the spread of the Zika virus and are conducting research to gather more solid data to better assess the risks associated with the infection. [More]
El Niño plays significant role in outbreak of haemorrhagic fevers

El Niño plays significant role in outbreak of haemorrhagic fevers

The dengue virus affects 390 million people globally every year, and fears are that early 2016 will see an epidemic, particularly in South-East Asia, due to the predicted extreme intensity of El Niño. A new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences has revealed the significant role that this monster climatic phenomenon plays in the outbreak of haemorrhagic fevers. [More]
Zika virus threat across the Americas

Zika virus threat across the Americas

Yesterday, the World Health Organization (WHO) announced that the Zika virus outbreak in Brazil was “spreading explosively” in the Americas and that as many as four million people could be infected by the end of the year. [More]
Zika virus expected to spread across the U.S., says WHO

Zika virus expected to spread across the U.S., says WHO

On Monday (Jan. 25, 2016), the World Health Organization announced that Zika virus, a mosquito-borne illness that in the past year has swept quickly throughout equatorial countries, is expected to spread across the Americas and into the United States. [More]
A Thai man with Zika virus has been hospitalized in Taiwan

A Thai man with Zika virus has been hospitalized in Taiwan

A man from Thailand has been hospitalized in Taiwan after having arrived there infected with Zika virus, an agent thought to be associated with brain-damaging birth defects in infants. [More]
Large-scale clinical trial to evaluate dengue vaccine launched in Brazil

Large-scale clinical trial to evaluate dengue vaccine launched in Brazil

A large-scale clinical trial to evaluate whether a candidate vaccine can prevent the mosquito-borne illness dengue fever has been launched in Brazil. The vaccine, TV003, was developed by scientists in the laboratory of Stephen Whitehead, Ph.D., at NIH's National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID). [More]
Simplified mathematical model to study spread of dengue fever in urban areas

Simplified mathematical model to study spread of dengue fever in urban areas

Mathematics is often implemented in healthcare and medical research. From health management to the bio-pharmaceutical fields, math modeling can be used to predict the spread of diseases, how to prevent epidemics and so much more. [More]
Findings show promising evidence for creating broad-spectrum antiviral

Findings show promising evidence for creating broad-spectrum antiviral

UW researchers working in collaboration with Kineta Inc. and the University of Texas at Galveston have shown that making a drug-like molecule to turn on innate immunity can induce genes to control infection in several -known viruses. [More]
SLU researcher discovered world's first dengue vaccine

SLU researcher discovered world's first dengue vaccine

A vaccine to prevent dengue fever discovered by a Saint Louis University researcher in 1997 and now licensed worldwide by Sanofi Pasteur has been approved for use in Mexico. Dengvaxia is the world's first vaccine approved to prevent dengue fever, which is a virus spread by mosquitoes primarily in tropical and sub-tropical areas. [More]
Oxitec prepares to increase supplies of OX513A to address recent outbreak of Zika virus in Brazil

Oxitec prepares to increase supplies of OX513A to address recent outbreak of Zika virus in Brazil

Intrexon Corporation, a leader in synthetic biology, today announced that Oxitec, a UK-based subsidiary of the Company, is prepared to increase supplies of its proprietary mosquito control solution, OX513A, through its Brazil facilities to assist Brazil in addressing the recent devastating outbreak of the Zika virus and other diseases transmitted by the Aedes aegypti mosquito. [More]
Researchers test effectiveness of commercially available mosquito repellents

Researchers test effectiveness of commercially available mosquito repellents

Researchers at New Mexico State University tested 10 commercially available products for their effectiveness at repelling mosquitoes, and the results were published in the Journal of Insect Science. [More]
Infections experienced in childhood may lead to premature ACS or heart attacks

Infections experienced in childhood may lead to premature ACS or heart attacks

"Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the number one killer worldwide, including in Indonesia where it accounts for 31.9% of all deaths," said Dr Qanitha. "CVD risk factors are rising rapidly in South-East Asia, particularly in young people. Most Indonesian CVD patients are under 56 years old and still economically productive. This very young CVD onset raises the question of whether local circumstances may play a role." [More]
Native Antigen Co. announces the launch of a new range of Dengue Virus-Like Particles

Native Antigen Co. announces the launch of a new range of Dengue Virus-Like Particles

Virus-Like Particles (VLPs) represent an increasingly important technology for use in vaccine development and serology. VLPs consist of protein shells comprising outer proteins specific to the virus in question. [More]
First-ever genomic study shows dengue may survive year-round in southern China

First-ever genomic study shows dengue may survive year-round in southern China

The first-ever comprehensive genomic analysis of the virus that causes dengue fever suggests that it may survive year-round in southern China. [More]
Health Partnership Scheme funds project dedicated to viral haemorrhagic fever

Health Partnership Scheme funds project dedicated to viral haemorrhagic fever

A team from Plymouth University Peninsula Schools of Medicine and Dentistry and Plymouth Hospitals NHS Trust has received funding of £136,000 from the Health Partnership Scheme to develop a training programme to help the Sierra Leonean Health Service to fight future outbreaks of viral haemorrhagic fever. [More]
Academies and DFG point out limitations and risks of new genome editing techniques

Academies and DFG point out limitations and risks of new genome editing techniques

More efficient bacteria and yeasts for use in fuel and drug production, new strategies to combat antibiotic-resistant germs, and innovative plant breeding methods - new molecular biology techniques that permit targeted genetic modification are giving rise to many promising new opportunities in research and application. [More]
Specialized proteins can inhibit HIV

Specialized proteins can inhibit HIV

There is little doubt that the Human Immunodeficiency Virus, or HIV, is devastating. More than 1.2 million people in the United States are living with HIV and more than 47,000 people are diagnosed annually. Now, University of Missouri researchers have made a discovery in how specialized proteins can inhibit the virus, opening the door for progress in the fight against HIV and for the production of advanced therapeutics to combat the disease. [More]
60P to commence Phase II clinical trial among dengue fever patients

60P to commence Phase II clinical trial among dengue fever patients

60 Degrees Pharmaceuticals, a company focused on development of therapeutics for tropical diseases, and Singapore General Hospital announced today that the Hospital has received a grant from Singapore's National Medical Research Council to support a Phase II clinical trial among dengue fever patients. [More]
NanoViricides speeds up HerpeCide drug development program

NanoViricides speeds up HerpeCide drug development program

NanoViricides, Inc., a nanomedicine company developing anti-viral drugs, reports that it is accelerating its HerpeCide drug development program. [More]
New study explores impact of climate change on human health

New study explores impact of climate change on human health

Researchers at Columbia University's National Center for Disaster Preparedness and the University of Washington have published a new study focused on the public health implications of climate change. The article explores climate change impacts on human health in the U.S. Gulf Coast and has implications for this and other coastal regions that are particularly vulnerable to climate change. [More]
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