Dengue Fever News and Research RSS Feed - Dengue Fever News and Research

Dengue (DF) and dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) are caused by one of four closely related, but antigenically distinct, virus serotypes (DEN-1, DEN-2, DEN-3, and DEN-4), of the genus Flavivirus. Infection with one of these serotypes provides immunity to only that serotype for life, so persons living in a dengue-endemic area can have more than one dengue infection during their lifetime. DF and DHF are primarily diseases of tropical and sub tropical areas, and the four different dengue serotypes are maintained in a cycle that involves humans and the Aedes mosquito. However, Aedes aegypti, a domestic, day-biting mosquito that prefers to feed on humans, is the most common Aedes species. Infections produce a spectrum of clinical illness ranging from a nonspecific viral syndrome to severe and fatal hemorrhagic disease. Important risk factors for DHF include the strain of the infecting virus, as well as the age, and especially the prior dengue infection history of the patient.
New research may help scientists develop treatments or vaccines for Dengue fever

New research may help scientists develop treatments or vaccines for Dengue fever

Two recent papers by a University of Colorado School of Medicine researcher and colleagues may help scientists develop treatments or vaccines for Dengue fever, West Nile virus, Yellow fever, Japanese encephalitis and other disease-causing flaviviruses. [More]
TSRI scientists receive $2.3M to study viruses that cause tropical diseases

TSRI scientists receive $2.3M to study viruses that cause tropical diseases

The outbreak of dengue fever that infected some 20 people in Florida's Martin County late last year unnerved many who feared the tropical disease had once again established a foothold in Florida. The last outbreaks occurred in 2009 and 2010 in Key West—before that, the disease hadn't struck Florida in more than 70 years. [More]
New national research consortium focuses on better drug therapies for viral infections

New national research consortium focuses on better drug therapies for viral infections

Viral infections with limited or no treatment options can pose a major global health threat, but a new national research consortium centered at the University of Alabama at Birmingham is focused on the discovery of new and better drug therapies as these viruses emerge. [More]
Notre Dame biologists awarded $23M research grant to prevent malaria and dengue fever

Notre Dame biologists awarded $23M research grant to prevent malaria and dengue fever

Notre Dame biologists Nicole Achee and Neil Lobo are leaders of an international $23 million research grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. Their five-year project will generate the data required to show the effectiveness of a new paradigm in mosquito control -spatial repellency - for the prevention of two important mosquito-borne diseases: malaria and dengue fever. [More]
New research may provide insight on how dengue virus gains entry into cells

New research may provide insight on how dengue virus gains entry into cells

Dengue fever, an infectious tropical disease caused by a mosquito-borne virus, afflicts millions of people each year, causing fever, headache, muscle and joint pains and a characteristic skin rash. In some people the disease progresses to a severe, often fatal, form known as dengue hemorrhagic fever. [More]
Triple-S announces consolidated revenues of $587.7 and net loss of $1.7 million for Q4 2013

Triple-S announces consolidated revenues of $587.7 and net loss of $1.7 million for Q4 2013

Triple-S Management Corporation (NYSE: GTS), the leading managed care company in Puerto Rico, today announced consolidated revenues of $587.7 million and a consolidated net loss of $1.7 million for the three months ended December 31, 2013. [More]
New study tracks spread of H5N1 variant in Egypt recently identified as major epicenter for virus

New study tracks spread of H5N1 variant in Egypt recently identified as major epicenter for virus

Since its first identification in Asia, highly pathogenic avian influenza-H5N1-has caused significant alarm in the scientific community. While the virus' primary target is birds-tens of millions have already died from it-it is capable of infecting mammals, including humans, causing serious illness and a frightening rate of mortality. [More]
Internet surveillance helps detect infectious diseases earlier than traditional surveillance methods

Internet surveillance helps detect infectious diseases earlier than traditional surveillance methods

The habit of Googling for an online diagnosis before visiting a GP can provide early warning of an infectious disease epidemic. [More]
Tackling orphan diseases: an interview with Damian Marron, CEO, TxCell

Tackling orphan diseases: an interview with Damian Marron, CEO, TxCell

The exact definition of orphan diseases varies depending on where you are in the world. In the EU it's defined as a prevalence of less than 1 in 2,000, which equates to about 250,000 patients across the EU. [More]

Visterra secures exclusive patent license for promising dengue virus antibodies from MIT

Visterra, Inc., a developer of novel antibody therapeutics to prevent and treat major infectious diseases, today announced that it has secured an exclusive patent license from Massachusetts Institute of Technology to a family of early-stage monoclonal antibodies that target dengue virus. These antibodies were developed by MIT in the laboratory of Dr. Ram Sasisekharan, a founder of Visterra, using novel protein engineering approaches. Visterra will apply its proprietary network analysis technology to develop a human monoclonal antibody product candidate capable of broadly neutralizing all four dengue virus serotypes. [More]

Research findings could help decrease risk of dengue

A study by an international team of researchers led by Anna M. Stewart Ibarra, Ph.D., of the Center for Global Health and Translational Science at SUNY Upstate Medical University, has provided public health officials with information that will help decrease the risk of dengue, a life-threatening mosquito-borne viral disease that is now one of the fastest spreading tropical diseases globally. [More]
European Medicines Agency awards orphan drug designation to NanoViricides' DengueCide

European Medicines Agency awards orphan drug designation to NanoViricides' DengueCide

NanoViricides, Inc. announced today that the European Medicines Agency, has awarded orphan drug designation to DengueCide, the Company's drug candidate for the treatment of dengue and dengue hemorrhagic fever. [More]
Research on flaviviruses could help in developing effective therapies for persistent infections

Research on flaviviruses could help in developing effective therapies for persistent infections

We generally do not devote much time to worrying about the problems faced by viruses, although understanding them may provide clues on how to combat diseases. [More]

Genetically modified bacterial treatment approach reduces or eliminates sleeping sickness

A tag team of two bacteria, one of them genetically modified, has a good chance to reduce or even eliminate the deadly disease African trypanosomiasis, or sleeping sickness, researchers at Oregon State University conclude in a recent mathematical modeling study. [More]
Researchers uncover how SARS coronavirus uses host cell to reproduce itself

Researchers uncover how SARS coronavirus uses host cell to reproduce itself

UC Irvine infectious disease researchers have uncovered components of the SARS coronavirus - which triggered a major outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome in 2002-03 - that allow it to take over host cells in order to replicate. [More]
A*STAR's SIgN discovers new strategy to develop universal dengue vaccine

A*STAR's SIgN discovers new strategy to develop universal dengue vaccine

A new strategy that cripples the ability of the dengue virus to escape the host immune system has been discovered by A*STAR's Singapore Immunology Network. This breakthrough strategy opens a door of hope to what may become the world's first universal dengue vaccine candidate that can give full protection from all four serotypes of the dreadful virus. [More]

SIgN discovers strategy that cripples ability of dengue virus to escape host immune system

A new strategy that cripples the ability of the dengue virus to escape the host immune system has been discovered by A*STAR's Singapore Immunology Network (SIgN). This breakthrough strategy opens a door of hope to what may become the world's first universal dengue vaccine candidate that can give full protection from all four serotypes of the dreadful virus. [More]
New research may influence development of anti-viral therapies to fight against Dengue

New research may influence development of anti-viral therapies to fight against Dengue

New research into the fight against Dengue, an insect-borne tropical disease that infects up to 390 million people worldwide annually, may influence the development of anti-viral therapies that are effective against all four types of the virus. [More]

UC Riverside researchers develop easy-to-wear patch that makes humans invisible to mosquitoes

​Technology that hampers mosquitoes' host-seeking behavior, identified at the University of California, Riverside in 2011, has led to the development of the world's first product that blocks mosquitoes' ability to efficiently detect carbon dioxide, their primary method of tracking human blood meals. [More]

Novel therapeutic approach prevents dengue virus replication by artificial microRNAs

Mosquito-borne dengue viruses cause an estimated 50 million cases of human dengue fever a year and are a significant public health threat worldwide. A novel therapeutic approach prevents dengue virus from reproducing in humans by targeting and silencing key regions of the dengue genome essential for viral replication. [More]