Dengue Fever News and Research RSS Feed - Dengue Fever News and Research

Dengue (DF) and dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) are caused by one of four closely related, but antigenically distinct, virus serotypes (DEN-1, DEN-2, DEN-3, and DEN-4), of the genus Flavivirus. Infection with one of these serotypes provides immunity to only that serotype for life, so persons living in a dengue-endemic area can have more than one dengue infection during their lifetime. DF and DHF are primarily diseases of tropical and sub tropical areas, and the four different dengue serotypes are maintained in a cycle that involves humans and the Aedes mosquito. However, Aedes aegypti, a domestic, day-biting mosquito that prefers to feed on humans, is the most common Aedes species. Infections produce a spectrum of clinical illness ranging from a nonspecific viral syndrome to severe and fatal hemorrhagic disease. Important risk factors for DHF include the strain of the infecting virus, as well as the age, and especially the prior dengue infection history of the patient.
Improving innovation uptake in the NHS

Improving innovation uptake in the NHS

I think innovation is one of those rather slippery terms that means different things to different people. First of all, I would make a distinction between innovations that are essentially about a new, physical product and innovations that are more to do with services or processes. [More]
Dengue vaccinations could increase incidence of Zika virus, research finds

Dengue vaccinations could increase incidence of Zika virus, research finds

Vaccinating against dengue fever could increase outbreaks of Zika, suggests new research out of York University and Xi'an Jiaotong University in China. [More]
UCLA scientists take promising step towards killing mosquitoes that carry Zika virus and dengue fever

UCLA scientists take promising step towards killing mosquitoes that carry Zika virus and dengue fever

Five UCLA researchers were part of an international team that has used X-rays to reveal the structure of a molecule that is toxic to disease-carrying mosquitoes. [More]
New evolutionary analysis provides insights into how Zika virus spreads between populations

New evolutionary analysis provides insights into how Zika virus spreads between populations

In a study published in Pathogens and Global Health, researchers have modelled the evolutionary development and diversity of the Zika virus to better understand how infection spreads between populations and how the virus reacts with the immune system. [More]
Scientists solve structure of BinAB toxin that kills larvae of certain type of mosquitoes

Scientists solve structure of BinAB toxin that kills larvae of certain type of mosquitoes

Could we get rid of mosquitoes without polluting the environment? Yes, we can! The BinAB toxin, produced in crystal form by a bacterium, specifically kills the larvae of Culex and Anopheles mosquitoes, but it is inactive on tiger mosquitoes (or Aedes), the vectors for dengue fever and chikungunya. [More]
Research uncovers new clues to combat dengue and Zika virus

Research uncovers new clues to combat dengue and Zika virus

Structural biology research conducted at the U.S. Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory has uncovered how small insecticidal protein crystals that are naturally produced by bacteria might be tailored to combat dengue fever and the Zika virus. [More]
Scientists reveal new structural insights on key protein from mosquitoes linked to spread of Zika

Scientists reveal new structural insights on key protein from mosquitoes linked to spread of Zika

As health departments around the U.S. boost efforts to combat Zika, scientists are working on new ways to kill the mosquitoes that carry the virus. One approach involves understanding the molecular mechanisms that keep the bugs alive so we can then undermine them. [More]
Mayo Clinic offers CDC’s Zika virus screening test

Mayo Clinic offers CDC’s Zika virus screening test

Mayo Clinic will offer the Zika virus antibody test developed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. [More]
Study: Risk of sports fans catching dengue fever during Rio Olympics low

Study: Risk of sports fans catching dengue fever during Rio Olympics low

The risk of sports fans catching dengue fever during the Rio Olympics is very low, according to a new study involving mathematicians at the University of Strathclyde. [More]
New odour-baited traps offer effective and safe solution to fight against malaria mosquito

New odour-baited traps offer effective and safe solution to fight against malaria mosquito

The use of a newly-developed mosquito trap incorporating human odour has resulted in a 70% decline in the population of the most significant malaria mosquito on the Kenyan island of Rusinga. [More]
Scientists modeling new control mechanism to combat Zika-infecting mosquitoes

Scientists modeling new control mechanism to combat Zika-infecting mosquitoes

The images are heartbreaking: thousands of infants born with small, misshapen heads, the result of a rare neurological disorder, called microcephaly, which can cause a myriad of intellectual and developmental disabilities. The culprit? Zika, a mosquito-borne virus that has swept through many parts of South America and more recently surfaced in Florida. [More]
Novel crowdsourced disease surveillance tool may help fight against dengue

Novel crowdsourced disease surveillance tool may help fight against dengue

Brought to you by Break Dengue, Dengue Track is a novel approach to disease mapping which could also be used to tracking Zika virus or Malaria. [More]
OVC research may help improve cancer treatment

OVC research may help improve cancer treatment

Cancer treatment in people could be transformed thanks to a study on treating cancer in animals led by researchers from the Ontario Veterinary College at the University of Guelph. [More]
Scientists use machine learning to interpret mosquito genome

Scientists use machine learning to interpret mosquito genome

Scientists are using machine learning to identify important sequences of DNA within the mosquito genome that regulate how the insect's cells develop and behave. [More]
Telephone-based disease surveillance system can forecast dengue fever outbreaks

Telephone-based disease surveillance system can forecast dengue fever outbreaks

A team of scientists has developed a system that can forecast the outbreak of dengue fever by simply analyzing the calling behavior of citizens to a public-health hotline. [More]
Pre-existing dengue antibodies can intensify Zika virus infection

Pre-existing dengue antibodies can intensify Zika virus infection

Previous exposure to the dengue virus may increase the potency of Zika infection, according to research from Imperial College London. [More]
Tackling Zika: are insect repellents the answer? An interview with Bruno Jactel

Tackling Zika: are insect repellents the answer? An interview with Bruno Jactel

The repellents that are used today are mostly based on what we call chemical pesticides. These products are used to repel mosquitoes as well as ticks. They are very broadly used, but there are different issues surrounding their use. [More]
Warming temperatures may increase risk for dengue outbreaks in Europe

Warming temperatures may increase risk for dengue outbreaks in Europe

Increasing temperatures will enlarge Europe's seasonal window for the potential spread of mosquito-borne viral disease, expanding the geographic areas at risk for a dengue epidemic to include much of Europe. The findings by researchers at Umea University in Sweden are published in the journal EBioMedicine. [More]
Research describes first new mouse model for Zika infection in decades

Research describes first new mouse model for Zika infection in decades

Efforts to combat the rapid spread of Zika virus got a boost this week as researchers at the University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston (UTMB) announced the first peer-reviewed publication of a mouse model for Zika infection reported in decades. [More]
Biological change in mosquito mating could be used to fight mosquito-borne diseases

Biological change in mosquito mating could be used to fight mosquito-borne diseases

Genetic cues from male Aedes aegypti mosquitoes passed on during sex affect which genes are turned on or off in a females' reproductive tract post-mating, including genes related to blood feeding, egg development and immune defense, according to new Cornell research. [More]
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