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Dengue (DF) and dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) are caused by one of four closely related, but antigenically distinct, virus serotypes (DEN-1, DEN-2, DEN-3, and DEN-4), of the genus Flavivirus. Infection with one of these serotypes provides immunity to only that serotype for life, so persons living in a dengue-endemic area can have more than one dengue infection during their lifetime. DF and DHF are primarily diseases of tropical and sub tropical areas, and the four different dengue serotypes are maintained in a cycle that involves humans and the Aedes mosquito. However, Aedes aegypti, a domestic, day-biting mosquito that prefers to feed on humans, is the most common Aedes species. Infections produce a spectrum of clinical illness ranging from a nonspecific viral syndrome to severe and fatal hemorrhagic disease. Important risk factors for DHF include the strain of the infecting virus, as well as the age, and especially the prior dengue infection history of the patient.
60P to commence Phase II clinical trial among dengue fever patients

60P to commence Phase II clinical trial among dengue fever patients

60 Degrees Pharmaceuticals, a company focused on development of therapeutics for tropical diseases, and Singapore General Hospital announced today that the Hospital has received a grant from Singapore's National Medical Research Council to support a Phase II clinical trial among dengue fever patients. [More]
NanoViricides speeds up HerpeCide drug development program

NanoViricides speeds up HerpeCide drug development program

NanoViricides, Inc., a nanomedicine company developing anti-viral drugs, reports that it is accelerating its HerpeCide drug development program. [More]
New study explores impact of climate change on human health

New study explores impact of climate change on human health

Researchers at Columbia University's National Center for Disaster Preparedness and the University of Washington have published a new study focused on the public health implications of climate change. The article explores climate change impacts on human health in the U.S. Gulf Coast and has implications for this and other coastal regions that are particularly vulnerable to climate change. [More]
Penn Medicine devises new approach to develop vaccines against lethal diseases

Penn Medicine devises new approach to develop vaccines against lethal diseases

Researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania have devised an entirely new approach to vaccines - creating immunity without vaccination. [More]
Scientists discover genetic markers for mosquito resistance to insecticides

Scientists discover genetic markers for mosquito resistance to insecticides

Controlling mosquitoes that carry human diseases is a global health challenge as their ability to resist insecticides now threatens efforts to prevent epidemics. Scientists from the CNRS, IRD, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Université Joseph Fourier in Grenoble and Institut Pasteur in French Guiana have identified new genetic markers for mosquito resistance to insecticides, which could improve its detection in the field. [More]
Dengue and chikungunya-carrying mosquitoes spreading to new areas, warn scientists

Dengue and chikungunya-carrying mosquitoes spreading to new areas, warn scientists

Scientists behind the first global distribution maps of two species of dengue and chikungunya-carrying mosquitoes warn they are spreading to new areas where they could cause disease. [More]
Study finds that Amazon river boats provide first-class ride for dengue mosquitoes

Study finds that Amazon river boats provide first-class ride for dengue mosquitoes

The urban mosquito that carries the dengue fever virus is hitching rides on river boats connecting the Amazonian town of Iquitos, Peru, with rural areas. [More]
Designing infectious disease forecasting models to predict dengue epidemics

Designing infectious disease forecasting models to predict dengue epidemics

Dengue viruses are on the move. Spread among humans by mosquitoes, and across geographic boundaries through travel, the virus affects up to an estimated 390 million people every year around the world. In the U.S., recent outbreaks have occurred in Florida, Texas, Hawaii, and Puerto Rico. Scientists know one of the best ways to reduce the impact of the disease is to prepare healthcare providers by forecasting epidemics before they happen. [More]
WHO committed to helping Nepal deliver health care to its citizens, says WHO South-East Asia Regional Director

WHO committed to helping Nepal deliver health care to its citizens, says WHO South-East Asia Regional Director

The World Health Organization is committed to supporting Nepal’s health system to deliver life-saving and essential services to its people and build back resilient health facilities that will be safe in emergencies... [More]
Papers on antibiotic resistance, neglected diseases and future of the ocean to be discussed during G7 summit

Papers on antibiotic resistance, neglected diseases and future of the ocean to be discussed during G7 summit

Today the national science academies of the G7 countries handed three statements to their respective heads of government for discussion during the G7 summit at Schloss Elmau in early June 2015. The papers on antibiotic resistance, neglected and poverty-related diseases, and the future of the ocean were drawn up by the seven national academies under the aegis of the German National Academy of Sciences Leopoldina. [More]
NanoViricides' anti-viral drug candidates show promise in lethal animal model of dermal herpes infection

NanoViricides' anti-viral drug candidates show promise in lethal animal model of dermal herpes infection

NanoViricides, Inc., a nanomedicine company developing anti-viral drugs, discusses the significance of the strong effectiveness demonstrated by its anti-viral drug candidates in a lethal animal model of dermal herpes infection. [More]
Study provides insights into climate, social factors that trigger dengue outbreaks

Study provides insights into climate, social factors that trigger dengue outbreaks

Researchers at Upstate Medical University, in collaboration with a team of international investigators studying dengue fever, have discovered new information on climate drivers of the disease and social risk factors that may be contributing to its spread, according to two scientific papers recently published in BMC Infectious Disease and BMC Public Health, open access, peer-reviewed online journals. [More]
Researchers harness gene editing technique in mosquito that infects people with deadly diseases

Researchers harness gene editing technique in mosquito that infects people with deadly diseases

Traditionally, to understand how a gene functions, a scientist would breed an organism that lacks that gene - "knocking it out" - then ask how the organism has changed. Are its senses affected? Its behavior? [More]
Insect-borne diseases increase with warmer climate

Insect-borne diseases increase with warmer climate

Insects, such as mosquitoes and ticks, are responsible for transmitting a range of diseases, such as malaria, chikungunya, dengue fever, and West Nile virus. The risk of contracting such illnesses is generally only considered when booking an exotic holiday. However, experts from the Emergency Response Department at Public Health England have warned that climate change could allow such vector-borne diseases to emerge closer to home. [More]
Globavir, BioManguinhos partner to jointly evaluate PanGlob RT-PCR Dengue diagnostic assay

Globavir, BioManguinhos partner to jointly evaluate PanGlob RT-PCR Dengue diagnostic assay

Globavir Biosciences, Inc., a biotechnology company developing diagnostic and therapeutic technologies to treat infectious diseases, has announced a partnership with BioManguinhos, a division of the Oswaldo Cruz Foundation, for a joint evaluation of Globavir's PanGlob RT-PCR Dengue diagnostic assay. [More]

Climate change could accelerate emergence of vector-borne diseases in UK

Climate change could accelerate the emergence of vector-borne diseases such as chikungunya, dengue fever, and West Nile virus in the UK, warn leading public health experts Dr Jolyon Medlock and Professor Steve Leach from the Emergency Response Department at Public Health England, writing in The Lancet Infectious Diseases journal. [More]
Virginia Tech researchers use genome-editing method to study lethal disease-carrying animal

Virginia Tech researchers use genome-editing method to study lethal disease-carrying animal

Life science researchers at Virginia Tech have accelerated a game-changing technology that's being used to study one of the planet's most lethal disease-carrying animals. [More]
Dengue fever circulating in urban areas of West Africa

Dengue fever circulating in urban areas of West Africa

Misdiagnosis of febrile illnesses as malaria is a continuing problem in Africa. A new study shows that in Ghana, dengue fever is circulating in urban areas and going undiagnosed. The authors of the study hope to use the findings to launch a widespread initiative to better understand acute undifferentiated febrile illnesses in West Africa. [More]
Modified measles vaccine effective against Chikungunya virus, study finds

Modified measles vaccine effective against Chikungunya virus, study finds

A modified, conventional measles vaccine has the potential to act against the Chikungunya virus. This is the result of a study at the University Clinic for Clinical Pharmacology of the MedUni Wien (Medical University of Vienna), which has now been published in the top journal "The Lancet Infectious Diseases". [More]
Simple paper strip test can rapidly diagnose Ebola

Simple paper strip test can rapidly diagnose Ebola

When diagnosing a case of Ebola, time is of the essence. However, existing diagnostic tests take at least a day or two to yield results, preventing health care workers from quickly determining whether a patient needs immediate treatment and isolation. [More]
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