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NYUCD awarded $1.7M Health Resources and Service Administration training grant

NYUCD awarded $1.7M Health Resources and Service Administration training grant

New York University College of Dentistry has been awarded a five-year, $1.7M Health Resources and Service Administration training grant entitled, "Preparing the Future Dental Workforce for Underserved Young Child and Adolescent Populations ("Preparing the Future"). [More]
Research finding could help reveal how the human brain learns complex motor skills

Research finding could help reveal how the human brain learns complex motor skills

Like top musicians, songbirds train from a young age to weed out errors and trim variability from their songs, ultimately becoming consistent and reliable performers. But as with human musicians, even the best are not machines. To learn and improve, the songbird brain needs to shake up its tried-and-true patterns with a healthy dose of creative experimentation. Until now, no one has found a specific mechanism by which this could occur. [More]
15th Annual Geriatric Health Care Symposium now open for registration

15th Annual Geriatric Health Care Symposium now open for registration

Registration is now open for the 15th Annual Geriatric Health Care Symposium, "Maximizing Independence for Optimal Aging," presented by the University of Louisville Institute for Sustainable Health & Optimal Aging. [More]
Anti-dementia drugs could result in harmful weight loss, say researchers

Anti-dementia drugs could result in harmful weight loss, say researchers

Medications commonly used to treat dementia could result in harmful weight loss, according to UC San Francisco researchers, and clinicians need to account for this risk when prescribing these drugs to older adults, they said. [More]
U-M’s Taubman Health Sciences Library reopens as transformed space for learning, teaching

U-M’s Taubman Health Sciences Library reopens as transformed space for learning, teaching

The books moved out two years ago, and the construction crews moved in. And today, the University of Michigan's Taubman Health Sciences Library reopens as a transformed space for learning, teaching and gathering. [More]
Study evaluates costs and benefits of medical board recertification for improving healthcare quality

Study evaluates costs and benefits of medical board recertification for improving healthcare quality

Many physicians are pushing back against or debating new requirements for maintaining medical board certifications, which affect more than 250,000 physicians nationwide. Now, a new study by UC San Francisco and Stanford University researchers concludes that the cost of implementing the most recent requirements will be an estimated $5.7 billion over the next 10 years. [More]
Finding by UCSF researchers could increase availability of kidneys for transplant

Finding by UCSF researchers could increase availability of kidneys for transplant

Mild hypothermia in deceased organ donors significantly reduces delayed graft function in kidney transplant recipients when compared to normal body temperature, according to UC San Francisco researchers and collaborators, a finding that could lead to an increase in the availability of kidneys for transplant. [More]
Endocrine Society recommends removal of tumor as first-line treatment for endogenous Cushing's syndrome

Endocrine Society recommends removal of tumor as first-line treatment for endogenous Cushing's syndrome

The Endocrine Society today issued a Clinical Practice Guideline (CPG) on strategies for treating Cushing's syndrome, a condition caused by overexposure to the hormone cortisol. [More]
Study explores better treatment options for patients with optic disc pits

Study explores better treatment options for patients with optic disc pits

New research from the University of Alberta's Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry is showing less is more when it comes to the treatment of optic disc pits--a rare eye condition. [More]
Recipients of GSA poster awards announced at 20th International C. elegans Meeting

Recipients of GSA poster awards announced at 20th International C. elegans Meeting

The Genetics Society of America and the C. elegans research community are pleased to announce the recipients of the GSA poster awards at the 20th International C. elegans Meeting, which took place at the University of California, Los Angeles, June 24-28, 2015. [More]
Researchers use silk fibers to grow stem cells into salivary gland cells

Researchers use silk fibers to grow stem cells into salivary gland cells

The silkworm, which produces the essential ingredient for fine silk fabric, also plays a critical role in a new process designed to provide relief for millions of individuals with dry mouth, a devastating oral and systemic health issue. [More]
Iron supplementation may increase risk of neurodegeneration, shows research

Iron supplementation may increase risk of neurodegeneration, shows research

Is it possible that too much iron in infant formula may potentially increase risk for neurodegenerative diseases like Parkinson's in adulthood -- and are teeth the window into the past that can help us tell? T [More]
Prostate cancer patients more likely to receive medical care matched to level of risk

Prostate cancer patients more likely to receive medical care matched to level of risk

After decades of overtreatment for low-risk prostate cancer and inadequate management of its more aggressive forms, patients are now more likely to receive medical care matched to level of risk, according to a study by researchers at UC San Francisco. [More]
Smokers who switch to low-nicotine cigarettes find difficult to curb smoking habits in the long term

Smokers who switch to low-nicotine cigarettes find difficult to curb smoking habits in the long term

Smokers who successfully lowered their nicotine intake when they were switched to low-nicotine cigarettes were unable to curb their smoking habits in the long term, according to a study by researchers at UCSF and San Francisco General Hospital and Trauma Center. [More]
Study shows regions of genome underlying IBD consistent around the world

Study shows regions of genome underlying IBD consistent around the world

The first genetic study of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) to include individuals from diverse populations has shown that the regions of the genome underlying the disease are consistent around the world. This study, conducted under the auspices of the International IBD Genetics Consortium, included nearly 10,000 DNA samples from people of East Asian, Indian or Iranian descent and an existing set of 86,640 samples drawn from across Europe, North America and Oceania. [More]
Mothers with chemical intolerances more likely to have children with ASD or ADHD

Mothers with chemical intolerances more likely to have children with ASD or ADHD

A new study from The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio found that mothers with chemical intolerances are two to three times more likely than other women to have a child with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). [More]
Adverse life events in childhood can increase woman's risk of preterm birth

Adverse life events in childhood can increase woman's risk of preterm birth

Like most health professionals, David Olson has known for some time of the dangers posed by excessive stress. His latest research, though, is giving surprising new insight into how chronic stress in childhood can have an impact years after it occurred in women giving birth. [More]
Depression, urinary incontinence magnify effects of vaginal symptoms in postmenopausal women

Depression, urinary incontinence magnify effects of vaginal symptoms in postmenopausal women

Special efforts should be made to identify and treat depression and urinary incontinence in postmenopausal women with vaginal symptoms, according to UC San Francisco researchers, as these two common conditions not only tend to co-exist with vaginal symptoms but also may complicate the impact of these symptoms on women's daily activities and quality of life. [More]
Experts call for more spending on global health aids

Experts call for more spending on global health aids

As experts debate the slow response to the Ebola outbreak in West Africa and call for better international coordination, a new analysis estimates that $22 billion was spent on global health aid in 2013, yet only a fifth of this went toward such global imperatives as research on diseases that disproportionally affect the poor, outbreak preparedness and global health leadership. [More]
Research examines reasons behind variation in prescription practices of antidepressants across Europe

Research examines reasons behind variation in prescription practices of antidepressants across Europe

Public attitudes towards mental illness and levels of healthcare spending may explain the huge variation in antidepressant use across Europe, according to a new study by researchers from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) at King's College London. [More]
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