Depression News and Research RSS Feed - Depression News and Research

Depression is a serious medical illness that involves the brain. It's more than just a feeling of being "down in the dumps" or "blue" for a few days. If you are one of the more than 20 million people in the United States who have depression, the feelings do not go away. They persist and interfere with your everyday life.
Cyberonics reports record worldwide net sales of $81.0 million for first fiscal quarter 2016

Cyberonics reports record worldwide net sales of $81.0 million for first fiscal quarter 2016

Cyberonics, Inc. today announced results for the quarter ended July 24, 2015. [More]
Valeant enters into definitive agreement to acquire Sprout Pharmaceuticals

Valeant enters into definitive agreement to acquire Sprout Pharmaceuticals

Valeant Pharmaceuticals International, Inc. and Sprout Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today announced that they have entered into a definitive agreement under which a wholly-owned subsidiary of Valeant will acquire Sprout, on a debt-free basis, for approximately $1 billion in cash, plus a share of future profits based upon the achievement of certain milestones. [More]
S1 Biopharma supports FDA's approval of flibanserin for women living with HSDD

S1 Biopharma supports FDA's approval of flibanserin for women living with HSDD

S1 Biopharma is a developer of first-in-class drugs for sexual dysfunction in both women and men. The company's lead compound, Lorexys, is currently in Phase IIb for the treatment of hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD). [More]
Stress hormone cortisol tied to thinking problems in healthy older people

Stress hormone cortisol tied to thinking problems in healthy older people

Testing the saliva of healthy older people for the level of the stress hormone cortisol may help identify individuals who should be screened for problems with thinking skills, according to a study published in the August 19, 2015, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]

Having depressed friends doesn't affect your mental health, study finds

Having friends who suffer from depression doesn't affect the mental health of others, according to research led by the University of Warwick. [More]
New guide may help parents detect body image issues in children

New guide may help parents detect body image issues in children

What does your teen see when they look in the mirror? Body image encompasses what a person believes about their outward appearance, how they feel about their body and how they sense and control their movements. [More]
Contact precaution use needs to be individualized to fit hospital's specific needs and resources

Contact precaution use needs to be individualized to fit hospital's specific needs and resources

Contact precautions are recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for all patients known to be infected with or carrying multidrug-resistant organisms (MDROs) such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE). Yet, the use of contact precautions--which require a patient to be isolated in a single hospital room and health care providers to wear a gown and gloves when caring for patients--is widely debated in the medical community. [More]
People near the middle of social hierarchies suffer higher rates of depression and anxiety

People near the middle of social hierarchies suffer higher rates of depression and anxiety

Individuals near the middle of the social hierarchy suffer higher rates of depression and anxiety than those at the top or bottom, according to researchers at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health. [More]
NIH funds multicenter study to evaluate impact of medical treatment in transgender youth

NIH funds multicenter study to evaluate impact of medical treatment in transgender youth

The National Institutes of Health has awarded $5.7M for a five-year, multicenter study, which will be the first in the U.S. to evaluate the long-term outcomes of medical treatment for transgender youth. [More]
Women who become mothers following fertility treatment face increased risk of depression

Women who become mothers following fertility treatment face increased risk of depression

Women giving birth after undergoing fertility treatment face an increased risk of depression compared to women ending up not having a child following fertility treatment, according to new research from the University of Copenhagen. According to the researchers, this has key implications for fertility treatment in future. [More]
Physical activity linked to reduced paediatric MS burden

Physical activity linked to reduced paediatric MS burden

A cross-sectional study has found an association between moderate or strenuous physical activity and reduced fatigue, lesion volumes and relapse rates in children and adolescents with multiple sclerosis. [More]
Scientists discover special brain mechanism that can retrieve unconscious memories

Scientists discover special brain mechanism that can retrieve unconscious memories

Some stressful experiences - such as chronic childhood abuse - are so overwhelming and traumatic, the memories hide like a shadow in the brain. [More]
Others consider our moral traits, not memory, to be core component of our identity

Others consider our moral traits, not memory, to be core component of our identity

We may view our memory as being essential to who we are, but new findings suggest that others consider our moral traits to be the core component of our identity. Data collected from family members of patients suffering from neurodegenerative disease showed that it was changes in moral behavior, not memory loss, that caused loved ones to say that the patient wasn't "the same person" anymore. [More]

Higher-quality romantic relationships associated with fewer psychosocial difficulties among adolescents, young adults

Adolescents who have romantic relationships tend to have more problems with psychosocial adjustment. In contrast, young adults who have romantic relationships tend to have fewer problems with psychosocial adjustment. Although the links between having a romantic relationship and psychosocial adjustment change with age, a new longitudinal study has found that it's not just having a relationship that matters, but the quality of the relationship: Higher-quality romantic relationships are associated with fewer psychosocial difficulties across adolescence and young adulthood. [More]
Scientists map 3-D atomic structure of protein complex that controls neurotransmitter release from brain cells

Scientists map 3-D atomic structure of protein complex that controls neurotransmitter release from brain cells

Scientists have revealed never-before-seen details of how our brain sends rapid-fire messages between its cells. They mapped the 3-D atomic structure of a two-part protein complex that controls the release of signaling chemicals, called neurotransmitters, from brain cells. Understanding how cells release those signals in less than one-thousandth of a second could help launch a new wave of research on drugs for treating brain disorders. [More]
Newly developed technique delivers wireless power for optogenetics

Newly developed technique delivers wireless power for optogenetics

A miniature device that combines optogenetics - using light to control the activity of the brain - with a newly developed technique for wirelessly powering implanted devices is the first fully internal method of delivering optogenetics. [More]
Kessler Foundation researcher confirms link between sleep disturbances and MS-related fatigue

Kessler Foundation researcher confirms link between sleep disturbances and MS-related fatigue

Kessler Foundation's Lauren Strober, PhD, explores the association of secondary fatigue and sleep disturbances in multiple sclerosis (MS). "Fatigue in multiple sclerosis: a look at the role of poor sleep" was published in Frontiers in Neurology. [More]
Chronic fatigue a long-term problem for testicular cancer survivors

Chronic fatigue a long-term problem for testicular cancer survivors

A Norwegian population-based study reported in the Annals of Oncology has found a rise in the incidence of chronic fatigue a decade or more after treatment in testicular cancer survivors. [More]
Prion protein could play a role in depression

Prion protein could play a role in depression

The discovery of antidepressant drugs in the 1950s led to the first biochemical hypothesis of depression, known as the monoamine hypothesis. This hypothesis proposes that an imbalance of certain brain chemicals is the key cause of depression. [More]
UCLA wins $2.5 million grant to enhance geriatric care in Riverside County

UCLA wins $2.5 million grant to enhance geriatric care in Riverside County

The UCLA division of geriatrics has received a three-year, $2.5 million grant from the Health Resources and Services Administration to enhance geriatric education, training and workforce development in Riverside County. The grant will fund a new partnership between UCLA, UC Riverside School of Medicine, Riverside County Regional Medical Center and the Riverside County Department of Public Social Services. [More]
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