Depression News and Research RSS Feed - Depression News and Research

Depression is a serious medical illness that involves the brain. It's more than just a feeling of being "down in the dumps" or "blue" for a few days. If you are one of the more than 20 million people in the United States who have depression, the feelings do not go away. They persist and interfere with your everyday life.
New study finds link between dyspareunia and mode of delivery

New study finds link between dyspareunia and mode of delivery

Operative birth is associated with persisting pain during or after sexual intercourse, known as dyspareunia, suggests a new study published today (21 January) in BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology. [More]
Childhood stress, psychiatric disorders linked to cellular changes that cause aging

Childhood stress, psychiatric disorders linked to cellular changes that cause aging

In a new study published online in Biological Psychiatry on January 16, 2015, researchers from Butler Hospital identify an association between biological changes on the cellular level and both childhood adversity and psychiatric disorders. [More]
MU researcher develops intervention to help older adults gradually adjust to hearing aids

MU researcher develops intervention to help older adults gradually adjust to hearing aids

When individuals wear their hearing aids for the first time, they are flooded with sounds they have not heard in months or years; yet, previous research has shown that not all new sounds are welcomed. Ambient noises such as air conditioners, wind and background conversations can be painful, irritating and difficult to ignore, causing some individuals to stop using their hearing aids right away. [More]
Prenatal program enhances couples' co-parenting relationship, improves childhood outcomes

Prenatal program enhances couples' co-parenting relationship, improves childhood outcomes

Children whose parents participated in a prenatal program aimed at enhancing couples' co-parenting relationship were better adjusted at age seven than children whose parents were assigned to a control group, according to Penn State researchers. [More]
Gedeon Richter, Actavis report positive top line results from cariprazine Phase III trial

Gedeon Richter, Actavis report positive top line results from cariprazine Phase III trial

Gedeon Richter Plc. and Actavis plc today announced positive results from a Phase III trial evaluating the efficacy and safety of cariprazine in the prevention of relapse in patients with schizophrenia. [More]
Regular outdoor walking in groups boosts health, reduces life-threatening conditions

Regular outdoor walking in groups boosts health, reduces life-threatening conditions

Risk of stroke, coronary heart disease, depression and other life-threatening conditions can be reduced through regular outdoor walking in groups, according to research from the University of East Anglia. [More]
Women with postpartum depression during pregnancy may face greater risk, study finds

Women with postpartum depression during pregnancy may face greater risk, study finds

When it comes to postpartum depression, one size does not fit all, according to a new study led by University of North Carolina School of Medicine researchers. [More]
Study: Depression, behavioral changes may occur in Alzheimer's disease before memory declines

Study: Depression, behavioral changes may occur in Alzheimer's disease before memory declines

Depression and behavioral changes may occur before memory declines in people who will go on to develop Alzheimer's disease, according to new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. [More]
Neurobiologists find paradoxical effect of abuse-related cues in infants, adults

Neurobiologists find paradoxical effect of abuse-related cues in infants, adults

Neurobiologists at NYU Langone Medical Center and elsewhere have found a surprising and paradoxical effect of abuse-related cues in rat pups: those cues also can lower depressive-like behavior when the rat pups are fully grown. [More]
Individualized, patient-centered care needed to treat and monitor people with chronic pain

Individualized, patient-centered care needed to treat and monitor people with chronic pain

An independent panel convened by the National Institutes of Health concluded that individualized, patient-centered care is needed to treat and monitor the estimated 100 million Americans living with chronic pain. To achieve this aim, the panel recommends more research and development around the evidence-based, multidisciplinary approaches needed to balance patient perspectives, desired outcomes, and safety. [More]
Life satisfaction associated with higher bone density in older women

Life satisfaction associated with higher bone density in older women

Women aged 60-70 who are satisfied with their lives have a higher bone density and they suffer from osteoporosis less frequently than their unsatisfied peers, according to a recent study completed at the University of Eastern Finland. [More]
Research findings may lead to new treatment for hypothyroidism

Research findings may lead to new treatment for hypothyroidism

An international research team led by physician-scientists at Rush University Medical Center have gained new insights into hypothyroidism - a condition affecting about 10 million people in the U.S. - that may lead to new treatment protocols for the disease, particularly among the approximately 15 percent of patients for whom standard treatments are less effective. [More]
State and federal prisoners not receiving adequate mental health care

State and federal prisoners not receiving adequate mental health care

A significant portion of state and federal prisoners are not receiving treatment for mental health conditions, according to research by The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston School of Public Health. [More]
Lack of information increases depression risk in people recovering from stroke

Lack of information increases depression risk in people recovering from stroke

People recovering from a stroke and living at home have generally a higher risk of suffering from depression. According to researchers lack of information is often a major concern for patients and this frequently contributes to their depression. This is the result of a new study from health sociologists of the University of Luxembourg. [More]
New UCLA study sheds light on why some people develop PTSD

New UCLA study sheds light on why some people develop PTSD

Why do some people develop post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) while others who suffered the same ordeal do not? A new UCLA discovery may shed light on the answer. [More]
Better physical functioning associated with remission of general anxiety, PTSD symptoms

Better physical functioning associated with remission of general anxiety, PTSD symptoms

In a two-year longitudinal study involving 13 intensive care units in four U.S. hospitals, researchers found that better physical functioning — basic and complex activities considered essential for maintaining independence — is associated with remission of general anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms. These findings may help clinicians be better prepared for caring for the growing number of survivors of critical illness, potentially leading to a better quality of recovery for patients. [More]
Research findings could lead to new drug design for neurological diseases

Research findings could lead to new drug design for neurological diseases

A new intermediate step and unexpected enzymatic activity in a metabolic pathway in the body, which could lead to new drug design for psychiatric and neurodegenerative diseases, has been discovered by researchers at Georgia State University. [More]
People working in prisons, secure hospitals are at increased risk of developing work-related stress

People working in prisons, secure hospitals are at increased risk of developing work-related stress

People working in prisons and in secure hospitals in the UK are at considerable risk of work-related stress, exhaustion and depression. This raises serious concerns for safety. [More]
Study highlights public health significance of depression among U.S. adolescents

Study highlights public health significance of depression among U.S. adolescents

A recent study published in the January 2015 issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry underscores the important public health significance of depression among U.S. adolescents. [More]
Sheffield researchers use ‘Conversation Analysis’ to improve dementia diagnosis

Sheffield researchers use ‘Conversation Analysis’ to improve dementia diagnosis

ANALYSING distinct features of conversation and how patients describe memory loss could improve the early diagnosis of dementia, and help those whose memory concerns are not due to dementia receive reassurance sooner. [More]