Depression News and Research RSS Feed - Depression News and Research

Depression is a serious medical illness that involves the brain. It's more than just a feeling of being "down in the dumps" or "blue" for a few days. If you are one of the more than 20 million people in the United States who have depression, the feelings do not go away. They persist and interfere with your everyday life.
Better self-care and patient education can improve treatment for chronic pain

Better self-care and patient education can improve treatment for chronic pain

The National Pain Strategy, released this year by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, places strong emphasis on self management and patient education as critical pathways for improving treatment of chronic pain, especially the leading malady, back pain. [More]
Novel ‘Catch It’ smartphone app can help people manage their problems

Novel ‘Catch It’ smartphone app can help people manage their problems

In a joint project between the Universities of Liverpool and Manchester researchers have examined the initial trial of a smartphone application designed to help people manage their problems. [More]
BetterYou Magnesium Oil spray relieves migraine pain in 43-year old mum

BetterYou Magnesium Oil spray relieves migraine pain in 43-year old mum

A 43-year old mum of one from Bristol, who suffered from frequent painful migraines for almost a decade has found relief thanks to BetterYou™ Magnesium Oil spray. [More]
Maternal stress, depression during pregnancy may activate protective mechanisms in infants

Maternal stress, depression during pregnancy may activate protective mechanisms in infants

Maternal stress and depression during pregnancy may activate certain protective mechanisms in babies. Psychologists from the University of Basel together with international colleagues report that certain epigenetic adaptations in newborns suggest this conclusion. [More]
General anesthesia affects heart muscle proteins and causes depressed heart function, study shows

General anesthesia affects heart muscle proteins and causes depressed heart function, study shows

Anesthesia is used every day, but surprisingly little is known about one of its most dangerous side effects--depressed heart function. [More]
Depressed cancer patients less likely to recover well after treatment

Depressed cancer patients less likely to recover well after treatment

People with depression are significantly less likely to recover well after treatment for colorectal cancer compared to those without depression, according to new research by Macmillan Cancer Support and the University of Southampton. [More]
New Canadian study highlights need to consider mental health of caregivers in post-ICU care

New Canadian study highlights need to consider mental health of caregivers in post-ICU care

A new Canadian study focusing on caregiver outcomes of critically ill patients reveals that caregivers of intensive care unit (ICU) survivors, who have received mechanical ventilation for a minimum of seven days, are at a high risk of developing clinical depression persisting up to one year after discharge. [More]
Children of depressed parents more likely to have recurrent episodes of depression, poor outcomes in adulthood

Children of depressed parents more likely to have recurrent episodes of depression, poor outcomes in adulthood

The latest report from a 30-year study of families at high- and low-risk for depression reveals that the offspring of depressed parents have a higher risk for depression, morbidity and mortality that persists into middle age. [More]
Lancet study finds unsafe sex as fastest-growing risk factor for ill health in young people

Lancet study finds unsafe sex as fastest-growing risk factor for ill health in young people

The Lancet Commission's groundbreaking report released today, "Our Future: A Lancet Commission on Adolescent Health and Wellbeing," finds that years of neglect and underinvestment have had serious detrimental effects on the health and wellbeing of adolescents aged 10-24 years. [More]
Repeat, low-dose ketamine infusions may quickly reduce suicidal thoughts in depressed outpatients

Repeat, low-dose ketamine infusions may quickly reduce suicidal thoughts in depressed outpatients

Repeat intravenous treatment with low doses of the anesthetic drug ketamine quickly reduced suicidal thoughts in a small group of patients with treatment-resistant depression. [More]
Innovative inflatable footbaths can help you nod off easily during hot sticky nights

Innovative inflatable footbaths can help you nod off easily during hot sticky nights

As temperatures continue to soar this week sleeping on these hot sticky nights can become an issue, so how do we best ensure a successful slumber? [More]
Depression course predicts dementia risk

Depression course predicts dementia risk

Patients with late-life depression have an increased risk of dementia if their symptoms increase over time, whereas a single episode of depression, even if severe, does not carry a significant risk, study findings indicate. [More]
Study shows risk of developing MDD depends on symptom centrality in network

Study shows risk of developing MDD depends on symptom centrality in network

A novel study published in the current issue of Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics discloses how depression may develop. [More]
Trauma-focused cognitive behavioral therapy effective in overcoming PTSS in children, adolescents

Trauma-focused cognitive behavioral therapy effective in overcoming PTSS in children, adolescents

A multicenter randomized controlled trial performed in Germany and published in the current issue of Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics discloses new indications for overcoming trauma in children and adolescents. [More]
Transcranial direct current stimulation proves effective for binge-eating disorder

Transcranial direct current stimulation proves effective for binge-eating disorder

Transcranial direct current stimulation, or tDCS, has proved effective for binge-eating disorder for the first time, according to researchers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. [More]
Neuroimaging studies offer new insights into cognitive vulnerability to depression

Neuroimaging studies offer new insights into cognitive vulnerability to depression

Neuroimaging studies of interconnected brain networks may provide the "missing links" between behavioral and biological models of cognitive vulnerability to depression, according to a research review in the Harvard Review of Psychiatry. The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer. [More]
New study finds link between prenatal SSRI use and umbilical cord length

New study finds link between prenatal SSRI use and umbilical cord length

Umbilical cords of children whose mothers used selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors during pregnancy may be longer than umbilical cords of other newborn children, shows a new study from the University of Eastern Finland and Kuopio University Hospital. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, SSRIs, are commonly prescribed antidepressants, and this is the first time their association with umbilical cord length was observed. [More]
Cancer may have negative impact on health of individuals as they age

Cancer may have negative impact on health of individuals as they age

A new study indicates that cancer may have negative impacts on both the physical and mental health of individuals as they age. Published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the study suggests that cancer increases the risk for certain health issues above and beyond normal aging. This is likely due, in part, to decreased physical activity and stress associated with cancer diagnosis and treatment. [More]
Depressed moms not physiologically 'in sync' with their children

Depressed moms not physiologically 'in sync' with their children

Mothers with a history of depression are not physiologically "in sync" with their kids, according to a new study from Binghamton University. While researchers have known for a while that depression is associated with interpersonal problems with others, this is the first study to examine whether this is also evident physiologically. [More]
Understanding differences in mental health symptoms in LGBQ community

Understanding differences in mental health symptoms in LGBQ community

A study exploring the prevalence of mental health symptoms in the lesbian, gay, bisexual and questioning (LGBQ) community, found that the oft-overlooked questioning and bisexual youth face their own significant challenges, particularly when it comes to depression, anxiety and traumatic distress [More]
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