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Electronic medical data could help verify link between maternal obesity and diabetes to autism

Electronic medical data could help verify link between maternal obesity and diabetes to autism

Scientists show they can use electronic medical records and birth information to verify and strengthen an already suspected link between autistic children and pregnant mothers with obesity and diabetes. [More]
Using antidepressants during pregnancy greatly increases autism risk

Using antidepressants during pregnancy greatly increases autism risk

Using antidepressants during pregnancy greatly increases the risk of autism, Professor Anick Bérard of the University of Montreal and its affiliated CHU Sainte-Justine children's hospital revealed today. Prof. Bérard, an internationally renowned expert in the fields of pharmaceutical safety during pregnancy, came to her conclusions after reviewing data covering 145,456 pregnancies. [More]
Study provides biochemical links between genes linked to autism and the inhibition of nerve cells

Study provides biochemical links between genes linked to autism and the inhibition of nerve cells

A study led by the University of Utah School of Medicine provides new insights into how the subtle changes within cells, caused by disruptions in a gene called Kirrel3, could underlie some types of intellectual disability and autism. [More]
New zebrafish study provides insights into causes of congenital heart defects

New zebrafish study provides insights into causes of congenital heart defects

Researchers working with zebrafish at New Zealand's University of Otago have published a study providing new insights into the causes of the congenital heart defects associated with a rare developmental disorder. [More]
Novel computational strategy may help identify genetic variants that cause disease in children

Novel computational strategy may help identify genetic variants that cause disease in children

The team behind the Deciphering Developmental Disorders (DDD) Study, one of the world's largest nationwide rare disease genome-wide sequencing initiatives, have developed a novel computational approach to identify genetic variants that cause disease in young children. [More]
OGT’s popular ESHG workshop free to view online

OGT’s popular ESHG workshop free to view online

Oxford Gene Technology (OGT), The Molecular Genetics Company, has made its European Human Genetics (ESHG) Conference workshop freely available to view online. [More]
OGT launches new arrays for developmental disorders at ESHG

OGT launches new arrays for developmental disorders at ESHG

Oxford Gene Technology (OGT), The Molecular Genetics Company, is today launching a new range of arrays at the European Society of Human Genetics (ESHG) Conference in Glasgow, UK, that are dedicated to elucidating the underlying causes of developmental delay. [More]
New study examines appropriate use of dietary supplementation in children with ASD

New study examines appropriate use of dietary supplementation in children with ASD

Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) are often picky eaters, which can lead parents to suspect that their children might not be getting adequate amounts of vitamins and minerals. This sometimes leads parents of children with ASD to try nutritional supplements and dietary regimens such as gluten-free and casein-free (GFCF) diets without professional supervision. [More]
New study identifies gene that causes potentially fatal Adams-Oliver syndrome

New study identifies gene that causes potentially fatal Adams-Oliver syndrome

A new study has separately confirmed and significantly built on recent research, identifying mutations of a gene that causes the uncommon but potentially fatal Adams-Oliver syndrome. [More]
CHOPS syndrome sheds light on key biological processes during human development

CHOPS syndrome sheds light on key biological processes during human development

Analyzing a puzzling multisystem disorder in three children, genetic experts have identified a new syndrome, shedding light on key biological processes during human development. The research also provides important information to help caregivers manage the disorder, and may offer clues to eventually treating it. [More]
Declarative memory helps individuals with neurodevelopmental disorders compensate for dysfunction

Declarative memory helps individuals with neurodevelopmental disorders compensate for dysfunction

Individuals with five neurodevelopmental disorders -- autism spectrum disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, Tourette syndrome, dyslexia, and Specific Language Impairment -- appear to compensate for dysfunction by relying on a single powerful and nimble system in the brain known as declarative memory. [More]
Improving prefrontal cortex activity could help autistic people regulate emotions

Improving prefrontal cortex activity could help autistic people regulate emotions

Tantrums, irritability, self-injury, depression, anxiety. These symptoms are associated with autism, but they're not considered core symptoms of the disorder. Researchers from the UNC School of Medicine are challenging this assertion. They have used functional MRI to show that - when it comes to the ability to regulate emotions - brain activity in autistic people is significantly different than brain activity in people without autism. [More]
Scientists receive NARSAD Distinguished Investigator Grants for mental health research

Scientists receive NARSAD Distinguished Investigator Grants for mental health research

The Brain & Behavior Research Foundation today announced the award of NARSAD Distinguished Investigator Grants valued at $1.5 million to 15 scientists, who are full professors or the equivalent, conducting innovative projects in diverse areas of neurobiological and behavioral research. [More]
Parent coaching intervention benefits preschool-aged children with autism

Parent coaching intervention benefits preschool-aged children with autism

A parent coaching intervention brings meaningful benefits for preschool-aged children with autism-spectrum disorders (ASD), according to a clinical trial in the October Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics, the official journal of the Society for Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics. [More]
Identification of neurotransmitter imbalance in Tourette Syndrome offers new treatment hope

Identification of neurotransmitter imbalance in Tourette Syndrome offers new treatment hope

Recent research, published yesterday, has identified a chemical transmitter in the brain that plays a vital role in Tourette Syndrome. This latest finding presents the potential for developing targeted, and therefore more effective, treatments to suppress the distressing symptoms of Tourette Syndrome. [More]
Changes in ADNP gene may provide further insight into causes of autism

Changes in ADNP gene may provide further insight into causes of autism

A new study from Bradley Hospital has identified a genetic change in a recently identified autism-associated gene, which may provide further insight into the causes of autism. The study, now published online in the Journal of Medical Genetics, presents findings that likely represent a definitive clinical marker for some patients' developmental disabilities. [More]
Brains of autistic kids are relatively inflexible at switching from rest to task performance

Brains of autistic kids are relatively inflexible at switching from rest to task performance

The brains of children with autism are relatively inflexible at switching from rest to task performance, according to a new brain-imaging study from the Stanford University School of Medicine. [More]
Computer analysis of family photos could help diagnose rare genetic disorders

Computer analysis of family photos could help diagnose rare genetic disorders

Computer analysis of photographs could help doctors diagnose which condition a child with a rare genetic disorder has, say Oxford University researchers. [More]
Exposure to elevated levels of steroid hormones in the womb linked to later development of autism

Exposure to elevated levels of steroid hormones in the womb linked to later development of autism

Scientists from the University of Cambridge and the Statens Serum Institute in Copenhagen, Denmark have discovered that children who later develop autism are exposed to elevated levels of steroid hormones (for example testosterone, progesterone and cortisol) in the womb. The finding may help explain why autism is more common in males than females, but should not be used to screen for the condition. [More]
Mutations in gene associated with leukaemia may affect growth, intellectual development in children

Mutations in gene associated with leukaemia may affect growth, intellectual development in children

Mutations in a gene associated with leukaemia cause a newly described condition that affects growth and intellectual development in children, new research reports. [More]
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