Diabetes Mellitus News and Research RSS Feed - Diabetes Mellitus News and Research

Diabetes mellitus is a severe and debilitating chronic disease that develops in nearly 5 percent of the world’s population. People with this disease have a shortage of insulin or a reduced ability to use insulin, the hormone regulating blood glucose levels, which is normally produced by the pancreas. In the United States alone, an estimated 18 million people have diabetes, and each year about 1 million Americans are diagnosed with the disease. It is the sixth leading cause of death in the US and is responsible for over 200,000 deaths a year. Insulin-dependent (type I) diabetes accounts for around 10% of diabetics. For those patients, suffering from an inability of their pancreas to produce insulin, the only practical treatment possible is regular insulin replacement by multiple daily injections. Transplantation of a pancreas or pancreatic tissue would be beneficial to millions of such patients in that it would restore their normal ability to produce self insulin. Transplantation of human pancreas or pancreatic islets is a practiced and time-honored such therapeutic approach, but is extremely limited by the severe shortage of human donor organs. Tissera's R&D efforts in this domain are directed towards the development of a universally available and reliable source of animal fetal donor pancreatic precursor tissue, suitable for transplantation and eventual normal structural and functional growth in human diabetics.
Ardelyx announces positive Phase 2b results for tenapanor in IBS-C patients

Ardelyx announces positive Phase 2b results for tenapanor in IBS-C patients

Ardelyx, Inc., a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company focused on cardio-renal, gastrointestinal and metabolic diseases, today announced positive results from its 371 patient Phase 2b clinical trial evaluating tenapanor in patients with constipation-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-C). [More]
EnteroMedics' CE Mark for Maestro System expanded to include management of Type 2 diabetes mellitus

EnteroMedics' CE Mark for Maestro System expanded to include management of Type 2 diabetes mellitus

EnteroMedics Inc., the developer of medical devices using neuroblocking technology to treat obesity, metabolic diseases and other gastrointestinal disorders, today announced that its CE Mark for the Maestro Rechargeable (RC) System for obesity was expanded to include the management of Type 2 diabetes mellitus through improved glycemic control. [More]
Storage symptoms more severe in men with comorbid diabetes

Storage symptoms more severe in men with comorbid diabetes

A study of men with lower urinary tract symptoms and benign prostatic hyperplasia suggests that the presence of comorbid diabetes is associated with more severe urological symptoms. [More]
FDA approves Contrave extended-release tablets for chronic weight management

FDA approves Contrave extended-release tablets for chronic weight management

Takeda Pharmaceuticals U.S.A., Inc. and Orexigen® Therapeutics, Inc. jointly announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved Contrave® extended-release tablets as an adjunct to a reduced-calorie diet and increased physical activity for chronic weight management in adults with an initial body mass index of 30 kg/m2 or greater (obese), or 27 kg/m2 or greater (overweight) in the presence of at least one weight-related comorbid condition. [More]
Clinical trial of stem cell-derived therapy for patients with Type 1 diabetes

Clinical trial of stem cell-derived therapy for patients with Type 1 diabetes

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, in partnership with ViaCyte, Inc., a San Diego-based biotechnology firm specializing in regenerative medicine, have launched the first-ever human Phase I/II clinical trial of a stem cell-derived therapy for patients with Type 1 diabetes. [More]
Researchers unravel molecular mechanism of mRNA recognition

Researchers unravel molecular mechanism of mRNA recognition

The information encoded in our genes is translated into proteins, which ultimately mediate biological functions in an organism. [More]
FDA approves Epaned for treatment of symptomatic and asymptomatic heart failure

FDA approves Epaned for treatment of symptomatic and asymptomatic heart failure

Silvergate Pharmaceuticals, Inc., focused on the development and commercialization of innovative and safe medicines for children, today announced that the United States Food and Drug Administration approved Epaned for the treatment of symptomatic heart failure and the treatment of asymptomatic left ventricular dysfunction (to decrease the rate of development of overt heart failure and to reduce hospitalization for heart failure). [More]
Study explores safety of breast cancer surgery in women aged 80 years and above

Study explores safety of breast cancer surgery in women aged 80 years and above

A study conducted by National Cancer Centre Singapore (NCCS) has shown that age per se is not a contraindication to breast cancer surgery, and such surgeries may be safely performed for women aged 80 years and above. [More]
Researchers examine risk of MCI and diabetes mellitus type 2 in middle-aged people

Researchers examine risk of MCI and diabetes mellitus type 2 in middle-aged people

In a large population-based study of randomly selected participants in Germany, researchers found that mild cognitive impairment (MCI) occurred twice more often in individuals diagnosed with diabetes mellitus type 2. [More]
Coffee increases risk of prediabetes in young adults with hypertension

Coffee increases risk of prediabetes in young adults with hypertension

Coffee increases the risk of prediabetes in young adults with hypertension who are slow caffeine metabolisers, according to results from the HARVEST study presented at ESC Congress today by Dr Lucio Mos from Italy. People who drank more than three cups of coffee per day doubled their risk of prediabetes. [More]
Measuring coronary artery blockage in heart attack patients can help avoid surgery

Measuring coronary artery blockage in heart attack patients can help avoid surgery

A method for measuring coronary artery blockage in heart attack patients can help more than one fifth of them avoid stents or surgery, according to a British study presented at the ESC Congress 2014 today. [More]
New research identifies five medical conditions that contribute to more North Carolina SUD cases

New research identifies five medical conditions that contribute to more North Carolina SUD cases

Sudden unexpected death (SUD) results from a malfunction of the heart and causes a rapid loss of blood flow through the body, leading to death. It is a very rapid process and may have few or no known warning signs. The overall survival rate for out-of-hospital arrest is only 5-10%. SUD is responsible for upwards of 450,000 people in the United States each year, with North Carolina experiencing an average of 32 SUD-related deaths each day. [More]
Childhood inflammation linked to adult psychosis

Childhood inflammation linked to adult psychosis

Elevated levels of the inflammatory marker interleukin -6 in childhood are associated with an increased risk of psychosis and depression in adulthood, research shows. [More]
Research demonstrates that African Americans bear heavier burden of DME

Research demonstrates that African Americans bear heavier burden of DME

Research by Keck Medicine of USC ophthalmology scientists demonstrates that African Americans bear heavier burden of diabetic macular edema (DME), one of the leading causes of blindness in diabetic patients in the United States. [More]
Using a nanotech microchip to diagnose type 1 diabetes: an interview with Dr. Brian Feldman, Stanford School of Medicine

Using a nanotech microchip to diagnose type 1 diabetes: an interview with Dr. Brian Feldman, Stanford School of Medicine

The most common form of diabetes is sometimes referred to as metabolic diabetes, which is the diabetes most people are very familiar with, type 2 diabetes. This form of diabetes is most prevalent in people that are overweight or obese. Historically, it has been confined to adults or older patients but it has been on the rise as the global obesity problem has continued to worsen. [More]
Severe obstructive sleep apnea associated with elevated blood pressure despite medication use

Severe obstructive sleep apnea associated with elevated blood pressure despite medication use

A new study shows a strong association between severe, untreated obstructive sleep apnea and the risk of elevated blood pressure despite the use of high blood pressure medications. [More]
Sanofi, MannKind sign licensing agreement to develop and commercialize Afrezza Inhalation Powder

Sanofi, MannKind sign licensing agreement to develop and commercialize Afrezza Inhalation Powder

Sanofi and MannKind Corporation announced today that they have entered into a worldwide exclusive licensing agreement for development and commercialization of Afrezza (insulin human) Inhalation Powder, a new rapid-acting inhaled insulin therapy for adults with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. [More]
Individuals with work related stress are at higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes

Individuals with work related stress are at higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes

Workplace stress can have a range of adverse effects on health with an increased risk of cardio-vascular diseases in the first line. [More]
People diagnosed with MCI are more likely to increase risk of developing dementia

People diagnosed with MCI are more likely to increase risk of developing dementia

In a long-term, large-scale population-based study of individuals aged 55 years or older in the general population researchers found that those diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) had a four-fold increased risk of developing dementia or Alzheimer's disease (AD) compared to cognitively healthy individuals. [More]
Loss of sensation in the feet of diabetics may predict heart attack, stroke

Loss of sensation in the feet of diabetics may predict heart attack, stroke

Experts have discovered that loss of sensation in the feet, a result of diabetes, may be a predictor of cardiovascular events such as heart attack and strokes. [More]