Diarrhea News and Research RSS Feed - Diarrhea News and Research

Diarrhea is loose, watery stools. A person with diarrhea typically passes stool more than three times a day. People with diarrhea may pass more than a quart of stool a day. Acute diarrhea is a common problem that usually lasts 1 or 2 days and goes away on its own without special treatment. Prolonged diarrhea persisting for more than 2 days may be a sign of a more serious problem and poses the risk of dehydration. Chronic diarrhea may be a feature of a chronic disease.

Diarrhea can cause dehydration, which means the body lacks enough fluid to function properly. Dehydration is particularly dangerous in children and older people, and it must be treated promptly to avoid serious health problems.
CMGH study offers insight into future interventions for Crohn's disease, chronic pancreatitis

CMGH study offers insight into future interventions for Crohn's disease, chronic pancreatitis

Cellular and Molecular Gastroenterology and Hepatology is committed to publishing impactful digestive biology research covering a broad spectrum of themes in GI, hepatology and pancreatology. We wanted to share two new CMGH articles, which both offer important insight into future interventions for chronic conditions. [More]
Outbreak of tropical parasitic infection observed for first time in the Arctic

Outbreak of tropical parasitic infection observed for first time in the Arctic

An outbreak of an intestinal parasite common in the tropics, known as Cryptosporidium, has been identified for the first time in the Arctic. The discovery was made in Nunavik, Quebec, by a team from the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre, in collaboration with the Nunavik Department of Public Health, Institut National de Santé Publique du Québec and Health Canada. The discovery, which was documented in the journal PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases, could have long-term implications for the health of children in Nunavik and Nunavut's communities. [More]
Research highlights global economic burden of norovirus

Research highlights global economic burden of norovirus

While norovirus is often linked in the news to outbreaks on cruise ships, the highly contagious stomach bug sickens nearly 700 million around the world every year and results in roughly $4.2 billion in health care costs and $60.3 billion in societal costs annually, new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health research suggests. [More]
TNF-alpha protein involved in autoimmune diseases may also promote tissue healing

TNF-alpha protein involved in autoimmune diseases may also promote tissue healing

As its name suggests, inflammatory bowel disease, which afflicts more than 1.6 million Americans, involves chronic inflammation of all or some of the digestive tract. An autoimmune disease known to have a strong genetic component, its symptoms are abdominal cramps, bloody diarrhea, and fever and, sometimes, weight loss. IBD, which is a group of inflammatory conditions, includes Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. [More]
Study shows safety of experimental drug guadecitabine in colorectal cancer patients

Study shows safety of experimental drug guadecitabine in colorectal cancer patients

In a small, phase I clinical trial, Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center researchers say they show for the first time that the experimental drug guadecitabine (SGI-110) is safe in combination with the chemotherapy drug irinotecan and may overcome resistance to irinotecan in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. [More]
Taking antibiotics in early childhood can disrupt immune system function lifelong

Taking antibiotics in early childhood can disrupt immune system function lifelong

Scientists want to know whether taking antibiotics early in life can disrupt your immune system function lifelong. [More]
New KidsMD Alexa skill device allows parents to get easier to access medical information

New KidsMD Alexa skill device allows parents to get easier to access medical information

"My child has a fever of 101. Should I be concerned?" Through a new skill created for Amazon Alexa-enabled devices, parents will now be able to ask Alexa a variety of questions around fever and other common symptoms. The KidsMD Alexa skill was developed by the Innovation & Digital Health Accelerator team at Boston Children's Hospital and launched today. [More]
RedHill Biopharma initiates phase II study of BEKINDA for irritable bowel syndrome

RedHill Biopharma initiates phase II study of BEKINDA for irritable bowel syndrome

RedHill Biopharma Ltd. (NASDAQ; RDHL) (TASE: RDHL) (“RedHill” or the “Company”), a biopharmaceutical company primarily focused on development and commercialization of late clinical-stage, proprietary, orally-administered, small molecule drugs for inflammatory and gastrointestinal diseases, including cancer, today announced that it has initiated a randomized, double-blind, 2-arm parallel group Phase II clinical study in the U.S. evaluating the safety and efficacy of BEKINDA™ 12 mg in patients with diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-D). [More]
Spending less than $5 per person could save millions of maternal, child lives every year

Spending less than $5 per person could save millions of maternal, child lives every year

By spending less than $5 per person on essential health care services such as contraception, medication for serious illnesses and nutritional supplements, millions of maternal and child lives could be saved every year, according to a new analysis led by the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. [More]
Vanderbilt's A.S.A.P sees increase in number of patients treated for alpha-gal syndrome

Vanderbilt's A.S.A.P sees increase in number of patients treated for alpha-gal syndrome

Vanderbilt's Asthma, Sinus and Allergy Program (A.S.A.P) has seen an increase in the number of patients being treated for alpha-gal syndrome, commonly known as the red meat allergy linked to tick bites. [More]
Investigators predict that new pneumonia epidemic in Beijing will likely to continue for longer time

Investigators predict that new pneumonia epidemic in Beijing will likely to continue for longer time

Mycoplasma pneumoniae infections began rising in Beijing last spring, and by December, this pathogen was found in more than half of hospitalized children suffering from pneumonia in that city, according to investigators from the Capital Institute of Pediatrics, Beijing, China. [More]
GHIT Fund invests in two innovative malaria eradication tools

GHIT Fund invests in two innovative malaria eradication tools

The Global Health Innovative Technology Fund (GHIT Fund) announced today that it’s investing US$1,383,785 in a pair of innovative malaria eradication tools—a vaccine that could block transmission of two species of the deadly disease and a rapid field test that can reveal a malaria infection in minutes. [More]
FDA approves Defitelio to treat hepatic veno-occlusive disease in adults, children

FDA approves Defitelio to treat hepatic veno-occlusive disease in adults, children

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Defitelio (defibrotide sodium) to treat adults and children who develop hepatic veno-occlusive disease (VOD) with additional kidney or lung abnormalities after they receive a stem cell transplant from blood or bone marrow called hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). [More]
NHS England to provide crucial funding for Janssen's HIV treatment, REZOLSTA

NHS England to provide crucial funding for Janssen's HIV treatment, REZOLSTA

Janssen-Cilag Ltd today announced that NHS England will provide crucial funding for its once-daily, fixed-dose combination of darunavir and the pharmacoenhancer, cobicistat, called REZOLSTA. [More]
New report finds 'double burden of malnutrition’ in South East Asia

New report finds 'double burden of malnutrition’ in South East Asia

A joint report from UNICEF, WHO and ASEAN has shed new light on the nutrition situation of children across South East Asia. The report finds that several ASEAN countries are facing simultaneous crises of over and undernutrition, with some children overweight while their peers suffer from stunting and wasting. [More]
Changing one atom in InsP6 inhibitor can increase its ability to neutralize toxins in the gut

Changing one atom in InsP6 inhibitor can increase its ability to neutralize toxins in the gut

Infections with bacterium Clostridium difficile have rapidly become a significant medical problem in hospitals and long-term care facilities. The bacteria cause diarrhea and life-threatening inflammation of the colon by producing toxins that kill the endothelial cells that form the lining of the gut. [More]
SLU researchers discover compound that disrupts fibrotic process

SLU researchers discover compound that disrupts fibrotic process

Saint Louis University researchers have found that a type of compound that disrupts the process that causes fibrosis (scarring) in the lungs and liver also shows promise in preventing and treating fibrosis in yet another organ, the pancreas. The research was conducted in an animal model. [More]
Sandia engineers aim to develop autonomous device to passively monitor mosquito-borne diseases

Sandia engineers aim to develop autonomous device to passively monitor mosquito-borne diseases

Mosquitoes are deadly efficient at spreading disease. Despite vaccines and efforts to eradicate the pesky insects, they continue to infect humans with feared diseases like Zika virus, malaria and West Nile virus. [More]
Clinical study finds no added benefit of using four TB drugs to save people with advanced HIV/AIDS

Clinical study finds no added benefit of using four TB drugs to save people with advanced HIV/AIDS

In a report on the so-called REMEMBER (Reducing Early Mortality and Early Morbidity by Empiric Tuberculosis Treatment) study -- a 10-nation, randomized clinical trial of adult outpatients -- investigators concluded that there was no added benefit of using four drugs for TB over just using one drug, isoniazid, to save lives in people with advanced HIV/AIDS. [More]
Research shows probiotic B. longum KACC 91563 has ability to reduce effects of food allergies

Research shows probiotic B. longum KACC 91563 has ability to reduce effects of food allergies

Lactobacillus might sound familiar when the topic of probiotics comes up, but they are only one of many types of bacteria that have proven health benefits. [More]
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