Diarrhea News and Research RSS Feed - Diarrhea News and Research

Diarrhea is loose, watery stools. A person with diarrhea typically passes stool more than three times a day. People with diarrhea may pass more than a quart of stool a day. Acute diarrhea is a common problem that usually lasts 1 or 2 days and goes away on its own without special treatment. Prolonged diarrhea persisting for more than 2 days may be a sign of a more serious problem and poses the risk of dehydration. Chronic diarrhea may be a feature of a chronic disease.

Diarrhea can cause dehydration, which means the body lacks enough fluid to function properly. Dehydration is particularly dangerous in children and older people, and it must be treated promptly to avoid serious health problems.
Preterm birth becomes world's number one killer of young children

Preterm birth becomes world's number one killer of young children

For the first time in history, the complications of preterm birth outrank all other causes as the world's number one killer of young children. [More]
Bacterial protein flagellin can prevent and cure rotavirus infection

Bacterial protein flagellin can prevent and cure rotavirus infection

Activation of the innate immune system with the bacterial protein flagellin could prevent and cure rotavirus infection, which is among the most common causes of severe diarrhea, says a Georgia State University research team that described the method as a novel means to prevent and treat viral infection. [More]
Strains of enterotoxigenic E. coli worldwide have similar toxins and virulence factors

Strains of enterotoxigenic E. coli worldwide have similar toxins and virulence factors

The strains of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) that infect adults and children in Asia, Africa, and the Americas, have notably similar toxins and virulence factors, according to research published ahead of print in the Journal of Bacteriology. [More]
Novel method could improve treatment for infants, young children suffering from HIV/AIDS

Novel method could improve treatment for infants, young children suffering from HIV/AIDS

A novel method of altering a protein in milk to bind with an antiretroviral drug promises to greatly improve treatment for infants and young children suffering from HIV/AIDS, according to a researcher in Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences. [More]
Study reveals ETEC bacteria's genetic composition

Study reveals ETEC bacteria's genetic composition

Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) bacteria are responsible each year for around 400 million cases of diarrhoea and 400,000 deaths in the world's low- and middle-income countries. Children under the age of five are most affected. [More]
Child-mortality gap narrows between the poorest and wealthiest families in developing countries

Child-mortality gap narrows between the poorest and wealthiest families in developing countries

The child-mortality gap has narrowed between the poorest and wealthiest households in a majority of more than 50 developing countries, a new study from the Stanford University School of Medicine has found. [More]
Inovio Pharmaceuticals reports Q3 2014 financial results, provides corporate update

Inovio Pharmaceuticals reports Q3 2014 financial results, provides corporate update

Inovio Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today reported financial results for the quarter ended September 30, 2014. [More]
UF Health researcher finds way to grow human norovirus

UF Health researcher finds way to grow human norovirus

Noroviruses are pernicious intestinal viruses. They cause violent vomiting and diarrhea, and people ill with the virus remain contagious up to three days after they seem to recover. [More]
New AGA guidelines provide guidance on IBS treatments

New AGA guidelines provide guidance on IBS treatments

Up to 15 percent of the general adult population is affected by irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), and most patients struggle to find effective drug therapy. A new guideline from the American Gastroenterological Association provides these patients and their physician's guidance. [More]
People with celiac disease have reactions to non-gluten wheat proteins

People with celiac disease have reactions to non-gluten wheat proteins

Although gluten-free foods are trendy among the health-conscious, they are necessary for those with celiac disease. But gluten, the primary trigger for health problems in these patients, may not be the only culprit. Scientists are reporting in ACS' Journal of Proteome Research that people with the disease also have reactions to non-gluten wheat proteins. The results could help scientists better understand how the disease works and could have implications for how to treat it. [More]
FDA approves CYRAMZA in combination with paclitaxel for advanced adenocarcinoma

FDA approves CYRAMZA in combination with paclitaxel for advanced adenocarcinoma

Eli Lilly and Company announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved CYRAMZA (ramucirumab) in combination with paclitaxel (a type of chemotherapy) as a treatment for people with advanced or metastatic gastric (stomach) or gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) adenocarcinoma whose cancer has progressed on or after prior fluoropyrimidine- or platinum-containing chemotherapy. [More]
AstraZeneca, Pharmacyclics partner to evaluate efficacy of IMBRUVICA for solid tumors

AstraZeneca, Pharmacyclics partner to evaluate efficacy of IMBRUVICA for solid tumors

AstraZeneca and Pharmacyclics, Inc. today announced that they have entered into a clinical trial collaboration to evaluate a novel combination therapy targeting solid tumors. [More]
Astellas' isavuconazole gets FDA orphan drug designation for treatment of invasive candidiasis

Astellas' isavuconazole gets FDA orphan drug designation for treatment of invasive candidiasis

Astellas announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has granted orphan drug designation to isavuconazole for the treatment of invasive candidiasis. [More]
ETEC vaccine candidate provides significant protection against bacterial diarrhea

ETEC vaccine candidate provides significant protection against bacterial diarrhea

New results from a safety and immunogenicity study, which included a challenge phase to test efficacy, indicate that a live attenuated enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) vaccine candidate, given in combination with a novel adjuvant, provided significant protection against disease. [More]
Passengers from West Africa to start 3-week Ebola screening

Passengers from West Africa to start 3-week Ebola screening

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has announced that any person flying into the USA from Liberia, Sierra Leone or Guinea will soon have to undergo daily Ebola monitoring for several weeks after their arrival. [More]
UB study: Males with IBS experience more interpersonal difficulties than females

UB study: Males with IBS experience more interpersonal difficulties than females

One of the few studies to examine gender differences among patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) has found that males with the condition experience more interpersonal difficulties than do females with the condition. [More]
Janssen announces submission of IMBRUVICA sNDA to FDA for WM treatment

Janssen announces submission of IMBRUVICA sNDA to FDA for WM treatment

Janssen Research & Development, LLC today announced the submission of a supplemental New Drug Application (sNDA) for IMBRUVICA (ibrutinib) to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration by its strategic partner Pharmacyclics, Inc. [More]
CHLA pediatric specialist discusses how parents can help children prevent Ebola outbreak

CHLA pediatric specialist discusses how parents can help children prevent Ebola outbreak

For many months, the world has witnessed the Ebola virus spread and claim more than 4,400 lives in West African countries. On Oct. 8, the first confirmed adult Ebola patient identified in the United States died. The constant news coverage has heightened concern among parents who fear their children will become infected. Jill Hoffman, MD, a pediatric Infectious diseases specialist at Children's Hospital Los Angeles, discusses the facts about Ebola, how parents can help their children prevent further outbreak by teaching them good hygiene, and how CHLA is prepared to identify and treat suspected Ebola patients. [More]
Columbia University professor recommends vaccination for people travelling abroad

Columbia University professor recommends vaccination for people travelling abroad

Planning to travel outside the U.S. this holiday season? Check with your primary care provider or travel clinic when you book your flight. [More]
Second Dallas health worker has Ebola; CDC announces 'more robust' response

Second Dallas health worker has Ebola; CDC announces 'more robust' response

Seventy-six health-care workers who helped treat Ebola patient Thomas Eric Duncan are now being monitored for potential Ebola exposure. Forty-eight others are being watched because they had contact with Duncan. [More]