Diarrhea News and Research RSS Feed - Diarrhea News and Research

Diarrhea is loose, watery stools. A person with diarrhea typically passes stool more than three times a day. People with diarrhea may pass more than a quart of stool a day. Acute diarrhea is a common problem that usually lasts 1 or 2 days and goes away on its own without special treatment. Prolonged diarrhea persisting for more than 2 days may be a sign of a more serious problem and poses the risk of dehydration. Chronic diarrhea may be a feature of a chronic disease.

Diarrhea can cause dehydration, which means the body lacks enough fluid to function properly. Dehydration is particularly dangerous in children and older people, and it must be treated promptly to avoid serious health problems.
New research shows childhood diarrhea cases significantly higher than estimated

New research shows childhood diarrhea cases significantly higher than estimated

The number of cases of childhood diarrhoea attributable to pathogens (bacteria, parasites, viruses or other infections) have been substantially underestimated and may be nearly twice as high as previous analysis suggests, according to new research published in The Lancet. [More]
Batavia Biosciences receives $8 million grant to develop safe, affordable rotavirus vaccine

Batavia Biosciences receives $8 million grant to develop safe, affordable rotavirus vaccine

Batavia Biosciences received an $8 million grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to develop a low cost manufacturing process to bring an affordable rotavirus vaccine to the global health market. [More]
Ancient remedy to treat severe diarrhea becomes effective therapy for multiple recurrent CDI

Ancient remedy to treat severe diarrhea becomes effective therapy for multiple recurrent CDI

Modern medicine is taking a new look at an ancient remedy for severe diarrhea as a novel approach to treat a serious gastrointestinal infection. [More]
Bile acid transporter inhibitors can prevent NASH in mice, study shows

Bile acid transporter inhibitors can prevent NASH in mice, study shows

Drugs that interfere with bile acid recycling can prevent several aspects of NASH (nonalcoholic steatohepatitis) in mice fed a high-fat diet, scientists from Emory University School of Medicine and Children's Healthcare of Atlanta have shown. [More]
Groundbreaking research findings could lead to potential new treatments for Crohn’s disease

Groundbreaking research findings could lead to potential new treatments for Crohn’s disease

A Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine-led team of international researchers has for the first time identified a fungus as a key factor in the development of Crohn's disease. [More]
Food intolerance testing: an interview with Dr Gill Hart

Food intolerance testing: an interview with Dr Gill Hart

Food intolerances are caused by adverse reactions to food or drink ingredients in your body. These are very different to food allergies. It is estimated that up to forty-five percent of the population suffers from food intolerances. [More]
Single-dose of anibiotic gel could provide easy and safe treatment for common childhood illness

Single-dose of anibiotic gel could provide easy and safe treatment for common childhood illness

A single-application bioengineered gel, squirted in the ear canal, could deliver a full course of antibiotic therapy for middle ear infections, making treatment of this common childhood illness much easier and potentially safer, finds a preclinical study led by Boston Children's Hospital in collaboration with investigators at Boston Medical Center and Massachusetts Eye and Ear. [More]
New drug holds potential for treating advanced mastocytosis

New drug holds potential for treating advanced mastocytosis

Most people have never heard of mastocytosis. It's a rare, sometimes deadly, immune disorder. Now new research may help those with advanced mastocytosis and possibly many more people, too. [More]
Pre-travel consultation can help international travelers to prepare for trip

Pre-travel consultation can help international travelers to prepare for trip

International tourism exceeds 1.2 billion persons each year, with more than 20 percent of travelers reporting some type of illness. [More]
Household transmission of C. difficile to children, pets may be cause for community-related infections

Household transmission of C. difficile to children, pets may be cause for community-related infections

Household transmission of Clostridium difficile to pets and children may be a source of community-associated C. difficile infections according to findings from a new study published today in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. [More]
New research may explain why people with blood group O get more severely ill from cholera

New research may explain why people with blood group O get more severely ill from cholera

People with blood type O often get more severely ill from cholera than people of other blood types. New research from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis may explain why. [More]
QOL Medical to introduce new disease awareness-raising tool at WCPGHAN 2016

QOL Medical to introduce new disease awareness-raising tool at WCPGHAN 2016

QOL Medical, LLC announced today they will introduce a ground breaking hyper-targeted marketing tool at the 5th Annual World Congress of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, from October 5th-8th 2016 in Montreal, Canada. [More]
Scientists grow noroviruses in laboratory cultures of human intestinal epithelial cells

Scientists grow noroviruses in laboratory cultures of human intestinal epithelial cells

Human noroviruses - the leading viral cause of acute diarrhea around the world - have been difficult to study because scientists had not found a way to grow them in the lab. [More]
Bacteria in smokeless tobacco products linked to opportunistic infections

Bacteria in smokeless tobacco products linked to opportunistic infections

Several species of bacteria found in smokeless tobacco products have been associated with opportunistic infections, according to a paper published August 26 in Applied and Environmental Microbiology, a journal of the American Society for Microbiology. [More]
Researchers develop new method to culture norovirus in intestinal cells

Researchers develop new method to culture norovirus in intestinal cells

Researchers have succeeded in culturing norovirus in human intestinal cells, a breakthrough that could help scientists develop novel therapeutics and vaccines against the debilitating effects of the virus. [More]
NIH researchers discover rare, lethal inflammatory disease that affects young children

NIH researchers discover rare, lethal inflammatory disease that affects young children

National Institutes of Health researchers have discovered a rare and sometimes lethal inflammatory disease - otulipenia - that primarily affects young children. They have also identified anti-inflammatory treatments that ease some of the patients' symptoms: fever, skin rashes, diarrhea, joint pain and overall failure to grow or thrive. [More]
BCL-2 inhibitor shows promise in AML patients

BCL-2 inhibitor shows promise in AML patients

Patients whose acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) had relapsed or was resistant to chemotherapy and those who were deemed unable to tolerate chemotherapy experienced responses to the selective BCL-2 inhibitor venetoclax (Venclexta), with complete remissions in some, according to phase II clinical trial data. [More]
UM SOM selected as study site for human safety trial of new Zika vaccine

UM SOM selected as study site for human safety trial of new Zika vaccine

As world leaders increasingly recognize the Zika virus as an international public health threat, the Center for Vaccine Development at the University of Maryland School of Medicine's Institute for Global Health has been chosen as one of three study sites in a human safety trial of a new Zika vaccine. [More]
FDA approves new injection to improve blood sugar levels in adults with type 2 diabetes

FDA approves new injection to improve blood sugar levels in adults with type 2 diabetes

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Adlyxin (lixisenatide), a once-daily injection to improve glycemic control (blood sugar levels), along with diet and exercise, in adults with type 2 diabetes. [More]
Study finds biological basis for gastrointestinal symptoms in people with non-celiac wheat sensitivity

Study finds biological basis for gastrointestinal symptoms in people with non-celiac wheat sensitivity

A new study may explain why people who do not have celiac disease or wheat allergy nevertheless experience a variety of gastrointestinal and extra-intestinal symptoms after ingesting wheat and related cereals. [More]
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