Diarrhea News and Research RSS Feed - Diarrhea News and Research

Diarrhea is loose, watery stools. A person with diarrhea typically passes stool more than three times a day. People with diarrhea may pass more than a quart of stool a day. Acute diarrhea is a common problem that usually lasts 1 or 2 days and goes away on its own without special treatment. Prolonged diarrhea persisting for more than 2 days may be a sign of a more serious problem and poses the risk of dehydration. Chronic diarrhea may be a feature of a chronic disease.

Diarrhea can cause dehydration, which means the body lacks enough fluid to function properly. Dehydration is particularly dangerous in children and older people, and it must be treated promptly to avoid serious health problems.
Preventing C. difficile infections could save thousands of lives and millions of health care dollars

Preventing C. difficile infections could save thousands of lives and millions of health care dollars

The constant fear of having an embarrassing bathroom accident paralyzed Judy Post. Mental, physical and emotional stress consumed her. She wondered if her life would ever return to normal. [More]
Monell Center receives Gates Foundation grant to support innovative global health research project

Monell Center receives Gates Foundation grant to support innovative global health research project

The Monell Center announced today that it has received a $345,000 grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. The grant supports an innovative global health research project titled, "Developing Novel Pediatric Formulation Technologies for Global Health: Human Taste Assays." [More]
Study highlights need to increase handwashing compliance among child care workers

Study highlights need to increase handwashing compliance among child care workers

Child care personnel properly clean their hands less than a quarter of the times they are supposed to, according to a study published in the December issue of the American Journal of Infection Control, the official journal of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology. [More]
Kratom may be safer and less addictive than current treatments for pain, research suggests

Kratom may be safer and less addictive than current treatments for pain, research suggests

A delayed U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration ban on kratom would stifle scientific understanding of the herb's active chemical components and documented pharmacologic properties if implemented, according to a special report published today in The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association. [More]
Preventative strategy in stem cell transplant recipients may help thwart C. diff infections

Preventative strategy in stem cell transplant recipients may help thwart C. diff infections

It may be possible to safely prevent one of the most common - and costly to treat - infections contracted by hospitalized patients undergoing bone marrow transplantation for the treatment of blood cancers, according to a study from the Abramson Cancer Center at the University of Pennsylvania. [More]
New report highlights global burden of maternal, newborn and young child deaths

New report highlights global burden of maternal, newborn and young child deaths

Today FIGO, ICM, ICN and IPA announce the publication of a report showing the global burden of maternal, newborn and young child deaths and launch the Together We Can campaign to tackle it. [More]
Study highlights potential to develop antiviral therapies, vaccines for treating astroviruses

Study highlights potential to develop antiviral therapies, vaccines for treating astroviruses

Human astroviruses infect nearly everyone during childhood, causing diarrhea, vomiting, and fever. [More]
New study shows link between defective sucrase-isomaltase gene variants and IBS

New study shows link between defective sucrase-isomaltase gene variants and IBS

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) affects a large portion of the general population. New research coordinated by Karolinska Institutet now shows a link between defective sucrase-isomaltase gene variants and IBS. [More]
Würzburg researchers develop novel technique to provide new insight into Salmonella infection process

Würzburg researchers develop novel technique to provide new insight into Salmonella infection process

Technological advances are making the analysis of single bacterial infected human cells feasible, W├╝rzburg researchers have used this technology to provide new insight into the Salmonella infection process. [More]
New research shows impact of fiber deprivation on mouse gut

New research shows impact of fiber deprivation on mouse gut

It sounds like the plot of a 1950s science fiction movie: normal, helpful bacteria that begin to eat their host from within, because they don't get what they want. [More]
Tips and tricks to get children through pains of teething

Tips and tricks to get children through pains of teething

Your baby is growing up so fast. It seems like just yesterday you were welcoming them home, listening to their first coos and, unfortunately, getting used to some sleepless nights. [More]
Identifying foods that trigger IBS: an interview with Dr Bill Chey

Identifying foods that trigger IBS: an interview with Dr Bill Chey

IBS is a common medical condition which is diagnosed in the presence of characteristic gastrointestinal symptoms including recurring bouts of abdominal pain and diarrhea and/or constipation. IBS patients also commonly report bloating and abdominal distension or swelling. [More]
New report highlights need for innovations to combat pneumonia and diarrhea among children

New report highlights need for innovations to combat pneumonia and diarrhea among children

A new report finds some progress in combatting pneumonia and diarrhea among young children in the nations most severely impacted by the two diseases, but they remain responsible for hundreds of thousands of preventable deaths around the world. [More]
New guidelines offer way for parents to introduce peanut-containing foods to reduce allergy risk

New guidelines offer way for parents to introduce peanut-containing foods to reduce allergy risk

Parents may be confused with how and when to introduce peanut-containing foods to their infants. [More]
Soiled clinical linens may be source of surface C. difficile contamination, study finds

Soiled clinical linens may be source of surface C. difficile contamination, study finds

A new paper published in FEMS Microbiology Letters, resulting from an investigation of a laundry facility that services several Seattle-area hospitals, suggests that soiled clinical linens may be a source of surface Clostridium difficile contamination. [More]
Polysorbate slows toxic effects of E. coli poisoning

Polysorbate slows toxic effects of E. coli poisoning

Polysorbate, a safe additive found in everything from ice cream to cosmetics, has been proven to slow the toxic effects of E. coli poisoning. [More]
Safe food additive can slow toxic effects of E. coli poisoning

Safe food additive can slow toxic effects of E. coli poisoning

Polysorbate, a safe additive found in everything from ice cream to cosmetics, has been proven to slow the toxic effects of E. coli poisoning. [More]
Two leading non-profit organizations sign strategic affiliation to hasten drug development

Two leading non-profit organizations sign strategic affiliation to hasten drug development

The Scripps Research Institute and the California Institute for Biomedical Research - two leading non-profit research organizations - today announced the signing of a strategic affiliation that combines the two organizations into a new biomedical research entity with the tools and know-how to rapidly translate its scientific discoveries into life-saving medicines for the public benefit. [More]
FDA approves new therapy for initial treatment of soft tissue sarcoma

FDA approves new therapy for initial treatment of soft tissue sarcoma

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today granted accelerated approval to Lartruvo (olaratumab) with doxorubicin to treat adults with certain types of soft tissue sarcoma (STS), which are cancers that develop in muscles, fat, tendons or other soft tissues. [More]
Four CGIAR researchers win World Food Prize for improving nutrition and health

Four CGIAR researchers win World Food Prize for improving nutrition and health

Four CGIAR scientists, Dr. Howarth Bouis (HarvestPlus), Dr. Jan Low (CIP), Maria Andrade (CIP), and Robert Mwanga (CIP) will be awarded the World Food Prize tonight for their combined success in improving nutrition and health through biofortified crops. [More]
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