Diarrhea News and Research RSS Feed - Diarrhea News and Research

Diarrhea is loose, watery stools. A person with diarrhea typically passes stool more than three times a day. People with diarrhea may pass more than a quart of stool a day. Acute diarrhea is a common problem that usually lasts 1 or 2 days and goes away on its own without special treatment. Prolonged diarrhea persisting for more than 2 days may be a sign of a more serious problem and poses the risk of dehydration. Chronic diarrhea may be a feature of a chronic disease.

Diarrhea can cause dehydration, which means the body lacks enough fluid to function properly. Dehydration is particularly dangerous in children and older people, and it must be treated promptly to avoid serious health problems.
Aggressive campaign to cut unnecessary use of antibiotics helps reduce drug-resistant bacteria

Aggressive campaign to cut unnecessary use of antibiotics helps reduce drug-resistant bacteria

An aggressive campaign to reduce the unnecessary use of antibiotics has helped cut the rate of infection with a dangerous drug-resistant bacteria at The Valley Hospital by nearly 40 percent. [More]
New initiative aims to provide women in developing countries with access to adequate water sources

New initiative aims to provide women in developing countries with access to adequate water sources

Imagine a day in which your access to clean, drinkable water ceased and you could not shower or bathe properly and you had no one to help you. For more than 783 million people around the world, that day was today. In 2015, more than 2.5 billion people will also lack access to basic sanitation in the developing world. [More]
Tillotts Pharma announces results of new survey in UC, introduces UCandME toolbox at ECCO 2015

Tillotts Pharma announces results of new survey in UC, introduces UCandME toolbox at ECCO 2015

Tillotts Pharma announced today results from a new European survey that revealed more than 9 out of 10 people with ulcerative colitis (UC) have low to medium adherence to their medication, putting them at five times greater risk of relapse. [More]
Palbociclib extends progression-free survival in advanced breast cancer patients

Palbociclib extends progression-free survival in advanced breast cancer patients

Palbociclib, an investigational oral medication that works by blocking molecules responsible for cancer cell growth, is well tolerated and extends progression-free survival (PFS) in newly diagnosed, advanced breast cancer patients, including those whose disease has stopped responding to traditional endocrine treatments. [More]
Researchers reveal how C. difficile wreaks havoc on guts, causes life-threatening diseases

Researchers reveal how C. difficile wreaks havoc on guts, causes life-threatening diseases

In a new paper in the journal Infection and Immunity, the researchers lay out for the first time exactly how C. difficile wreaks havoc on the guts of animals in a short time, and causes severe diarrhea and life-threatening disease in humans. [More]
Actavis provides overview of standalone global pharmaceutical development pipeline

Actavis provides overview of standalone global pharmaceutical development pipeline

Actavis plc, during its Investor Meeting in New York, today provided a detailed look into its standalone global pharmaceutical development pipeline that supports the Company's long-term organic growth. The Company provided details regarding key development programs, including clinical data, development milestones and an overview of potential market opportunities, as well as an updated look at Actavis' world-class generics pipeline, which continues to hold an industry-leading position in First-to-File opportunities in the U.S. [More]
Medical practitioners rarely prescribe proper treatments for childhood diarrhea, pneumonia in rural India

Medical practitioners rarely prescribe proper treatments for childhood diarrhea, pneumonia in rural India

Few health care providers in rural India know the correct treatments for childhood diarrhea and pneumonia - two leading killers of young children worldwide. But even when they do, they rarely prescribe them properly, according to a new Duke University study. [More]
Eisai announces FDA approval of LENVIMA (lenvatinib) for treatment of RAI-refractory DTC

Eisai announces FDA approval of LENVIMA (lenvatinib) for treatment of RAI-refractory DTC

Eisai Inc. announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the company's receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor LENVIMA (lenvatinib) for the treatment of locally recurrent or metastatic, progressive, radioactive iodine-refractory differentiated thyroid cancer (RAI-R DTC). [More]
Lenvatinib trial offers hope for thyroid cancer patients

Lenvatinib trial offers hope for thyroid cancer patients

A new targeted therapy called lenvatinib has been shown to improve progression-free survival among patients with advanced thyroid cancer that is not responsive to iodine-131. [More]
Lenvatinib therapy improves survival in patients with advanced radioiodine-refractory thyroid cancer

Lenvatinib therapy improves survival in patients with advanced radioiodine-refractory thyroid cancer

In a pivotal Phase III study led by researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, the oral anti-angiogenic therapy lenvatinib has shown dramatic improvement in progression-free survival in patients with advanced radioiodine-refractory thyroid cancer. [More]
Standard cleaning procedures in retail delis may not eradicate Listeria pathogen, study shows

Standard cleaning procedures in retail delis may not eradicate Listeria pathogen, study shows

Purdue University research shows that standard cleaning procedures in retail delis may not eradicate Listeria monocytogenes bacteria, which can cause a potentially fatal disease in people with vulnerable immune systems. [More]
OSU researchers discover impact of antibiotics on microorganisms that live in animal's gut

OSU researchers discover impact of antibiotics on microorganisms that live in animal's gut

Researchers at Oregon State University have discovered that antibiotics have an impact on the microorganisms that live in an animal's gut that's more broad and complex than previously known. [More]
Study suggests that gastric bypass should be used with caution to treat extreme obesity

Study suggests that gastric bypass should be used with caution to treat extreme obesity

Based on five-year follow-up of patients in a randomized clinical trial, researchers have concluded that gastric bypass is the preferred treatment for extreme obesity. This is despite the fact that it is not as effective in reducing body weight as the so-called duodenal switch. [More]
Synthetic Biologics reports positive results from SYN-004 Phase 1b trial to prevent C. difficile infection

Synthetic Biologics reports positive results from SYN-004 Phase 1b trial to prevent C. difficile infection

Synthetic Biologics, Inc., a developer of pathogen-specific therapies for serious infections and diseases, with a focus on protecting the microbiome, today announced positive topline safety and tolerability results from a Phase 1b clinical trial of SYN-004, the Company's investigational oral beta-lactamase enzyme designed to protect the microbiome and prevent Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) infection, antibiotic-associated diarrhea and secondary antibiotic-resistant infections in patients receiving intravenous (IV) beta-lactam antibiotic therapy. [More]
Chiasma announces publication of octreotide capsules Phase III study results in JCEM

Chiasma announces publication of octreotide capsules Phase III study results in JCEM

Chiasma Inc., a U.S. privately-held biopharma company, announced today that results from a multicenter Phase III study of the investigational new drug, octreotide capsules, were published online for early release on Feb. 9, ahead of print, by the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. [More]
Risks and benefits of fecal microbiota transplant

Risks and benefits of fecal microbiota transplant

A woman successfully treated for a recurrent Clostridium difficile infection with stool from an overweight donor rapidly gained weight herself afterwards, becoming obese, according to a case report published in the new journal Open Forum Infectious Diseases. [More]
Helsinn begins elsiglutide Phase IIB trial for prevention of chemotherapy-induced diarrhea

Helsinn begins elsiglutide Phase IIB trial for prevention of chemotherapy-induced diarrhea

Helsinn Healthcare S.A. and Zealand Pharma A/S jointly announce that Helsinn has started a Phase IIB clinical dose-finding trial of elsiglutide for the prevention of chemotherapy-induced diarrhea (CID). The first patients out of a planned total of 600 patients with colorectal cancer treated with chemotherapy have been dosed in the trial. [More]
Infectious diseases expert discusses the myths and facts about measles outbreak

Infectious diseases expert discusses the myths and facts about measles outbreak

Measles, a highly contagious respiratory infection that causes serious complications in about 3 of 10 people, has been grabbing headlines since last December's outbreak at Disneyland. In January, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported 102 cases of measles in 14 states. One unconfirmed case was just reported in New Jersey. Measured against the approximately 600 cases reported in 2014, this year is on track to set a record for a disease that was declared eradicated in the United States in 2000. [More]
Chinese researchers achieve major breakthrough in nano-carrier drugs for pancreatic cancer

Chinese researchers achieve major breakthrough in nano-carrier drugs for pancreatic cancer

At the "Symposium on the Application of Genetic Testing in Individualized Diagnosis and Treatment of Tumor" recently held in Tianjin, the research team led by Professor Hao Jihui of the Pancreas Oncology Department of Tianjin Medical University Cancer Hospital announced that they had achieved a major breakthrough in the field of nano-carrier drugs for pancreatic cancer. [More]
ACEP: Emergency rooms are fully prepared to handle measles outbreak

ACEP: Emergency rooms are fully prepared to handle measles outbreak

The nation is dealing with the worst measles outbreak in more than a decade. Once again — and reminiscent of the recent Ebola crisis — the nation's emergency physicians are working to track and treat another infectious disease in the midst of a severe flu season. [More]
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