Diarrhea News and Research RSS Feed - Diarrhea News and Research

Diarrhea is loose, watery stools. A person with diarrhea typically passes stool more than three times a day. People with diarrhea may pass more than a quart of stool a day. Acute diarrhea is a common problem that usually lasts 1 or 2 days and goes away on its own without special treatment. Prolonged diarrhea persisting for more than 2 days may be a sign of a more serious problem and poses the risk of dehydration. Chronic diarrhea may be a feature of a chronic disease.

Diarrhea can cause dehydration, which means the body lacks enough fluid to function properly. Dehydration is particularly dangerous in children and older people, and it must be treated promptly to avoid serious health problems.
Johns Hopkins pediatricians offer guidelines on choosing between urgent care and ER

Johns Hopkins pediatricians offer guidelines on choosing between urgent care and ER

Parents have a natural tendency to fear the worst when it comes to their children and often opt for a "better safe than sorry" course of action, Canares says, but the truth is many situations don't warrant a trip to the emergency room. At the other end of the spectrum are cases that clearly require emergency attention but end up in urgent care instead — a less common scenario, Canares says. [More]
Gluten-free diet important for people with celiac disease

Gluten-free diet important for people with celiac disease

You'd never suspect it from the proliferation of gluten-free items on supermarket shelves. Yet only one in approximately 133 people - that's 0.75 percent of the population - has celiac disease, a genetic autoimmune disorder that causes the body to react negatively to the intake of gluten, a protein found in wheat, rye, barley and their derivatives. [More]
Study links lysosomal dysfunction with neonatal intestinal disorders

Study links lysosomal dysfunction with neonatal intestinal disorders

Neonatal intestinal disorders that prevent infants from getting the nutrients they need may be caused by defects in the lysosomal system that occur before weaning, according to a new Northwestern Medicine study. [More]
Kaleo, CHMI partner to reduce prescription drug-related deaths

Kaleo, CHMI partner to reduce prescription drug-related deaths

Kaleo, a privately-held pharmaceutical company, today announced a national strategic partnership with the Clinton Health Matters Initiative, an initiative of the Clinton Foundation, that will help support its goal of cutting prescription drug-related deaths in half, saving approximately 10,000 lives over five years. [More]
Taking antibiotics for diarrhea may put travelers at increased risk for contracting superbugs

Taking antibiotics for diarrhea may put travelers at increased risk for contracting superbugs

Taking antibiotics for diarrhea may put travelers visiting developing parts of the world at higher risk for contracting superbugs and spreading these daunting drug-resistant bacteria to their home countries, according to a new study published in Clinical Infectious Diseases and now available online. [More]
Study suggests that antibiotics may help fight norovirus

Study suggests that antibiotics may help fight norovirus

Antibiotics aren't supposed to be effective against viruses. But new evidence in mice suggests antibiotics may help fight norovirus, a highly contagious gastrointestinal virus, report scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. [More]

Virginia Tech researchers call for critical review of EPA's secondary standards for drinking water

Changes in drinking water quality in the 21st Century are coming from a myriad of circumstances, and not all are for the best. Top contenders for why water-drinking quality might become suspect to the average consumer include California's drought conditions, the technology of fracking, and the nationwide aging infrastructure of rusty, degrading pipes. [More]
Cold atmospheric pressure plasma treatment may reduce risk of transmitting norovirus

Cold atmospheric pressure plasma treatment may reduce risk of transmitting norovirus

Treating surfaces with cold atmospheric pressure plasma (CAPP) may reduce the risk of transmitting norovirus, a contagious virus leading to stomach pain, nausea and diarrhea, according to a new study. [More]
Synthetic Biologics doses first patient in SYN-004 Phase 1b trial to prevent C. difficile infection

Synthetic Biologics doses first patient in SYN-004 Phase 1b trial to prevent C. difficile infection

Synthetic Biologics, Inc., a developer of pathogen-specific therapies for serious infections and diseases, with a focus on protecting the microbiome, today announced that enrollment has initiated and the first patient was dosed in a Phase 1b clinical trial of SYN-004, an investigational oral beta-lactamase enzyme for the prevention of Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) infection, antibiotic-associated diarrhea and secondary antibiotic-resistant infections in patients receiving intravenous (IV) beta-lactam antibiotic therapy. [More]
Janssen, Gilead to jointly develop darunavir-based, single-tablet regimen for HIV treatment

Janssen, Gilead to jointly develop darunavir-based, single-tablet regimen for HIV treatment

Janssen R&D Ireland announced today an amendment to its existing agreement with Gilead Sciences, Inc., initially established in 2011, for the development of a once daily, darunavir-based, single-tablet regimen (STR) for the treatment of people living with HIV. [More]
United Therapeutics submits pre-market approval application for use of Remodulin with implantable drug infusion system

United Therapeutics submits pre-market approval application for use of Remodulin with implantable drug infusion system

United Therapeutics Corporation (NASDAQ: UTHR) announced today that Medtronic, Inc. (NYSE: MDT) has submitted a pre-market approval application to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the use of Medtronic's SynchroMed® II implantable drug infusion system (including a newly developed catheter) for use with United Therapeutics' Remodulin® (treprostinil) Injection delivered intravenously to patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension. [More]
FDA approves Novo Nordisk’s weight loss injection, Saxenda

FDA approves Novo Nordisk’s weight loss injection, Saxenda

Novo Nordisk today announced that the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved the new drug application (NDA) for Saxenda® (liraglutide [rDNA origin] injection), the first once-daily glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist for chronic weight management. [More]
FDA approves Namzaric drug for treatment of moderate to severe Alzheimer's disease

FDA approves Namzaric drug for treatment of moderate to severe Alzheimer's disease

Actavis plc and Adamas Pharmaceuticals Inc. today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved the New Drug Application (NDA) for Namzaric, a fixed-dose combination (FDC) of memantine hydrochloride extended-release, a NMDA receptor antagonist, and donepezil hydrochloride, an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor. [More]
Keryx Biopharmaceuticals supplies AURYXIA tablets to wholesalers in US

Keryx Biopharmaceuticals supplies AURYXIA tablets to wholesalers in US

Keryx Biopharmaceuticals, Inc. (Nasdaq: KERX) (the "Company") today announced it has begun shipping AURYXIA™ (ferric citrate) tablets to wholesalers in the U.S. Auryxia is approved for the control of serum phosphorus levels in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) on dialysis. [More]
FDA approves intravenous administration of Erwinaze (asparaginase Erwinia chrysanthemi)

FDA approves intravenous administration of Erwinaze (asparaginase Erwinia chrysanthemi)

Jazz Pharmaceuticals plc today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the intravenous administration of Erwinaze (asparaginase Erwinia chrysanthemi). Erwinaze is indicated as a component of a multi-agent chemotherapeutic regimen for the treatment of patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) who have developed hypersensitivity to E. coli-derived asparaginase. [More]
Lilly receives FDA approval for CYRAMZA (ramucirumab)

Lilly receives FDA approval for CYRAMZA (ramucirumab)

Eli Lilly and Company has received its third U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval for CYRAMZA (ramucirumab). [More]
Novartis announces FDA approval of Signifor LAR for treatment of patients with acromegaly

Novartis announces FDA approval of Signifor LAR for treatment of patients with acromegaly

Novartis announced today that the US Food and Drug Administration has approved Signifor long-acting release (LAR) (pasireotide) for injectable suspension, for intramuscular use, for the treatment of patients with acromegaly who have had an inadequate response to surgery and/or for whom surgery is not an option. [More]
Pharmacyclics receives BayBio's 2014 Pantheon DiNA Award for Outstanding Company

Pharmacyclics receives BayBio's 2014 Pantheon DiNA Award for Outstanding Company

Pharmacyclics, Inc. today announced that it has been awarded BayBio's 2014 Pantheon DiNA Award for Outstanding Company for its rapid development and commercialization of IMBRUVICA (ibrutinib). The award was presented at BayBio's 11th Annual Pantheon DiNA Awards ceremony in San Francisco. [More]
Danish researchers working on new type of vaccine that targets disease causing bacterium

Danish researchers working on new type of vaccine that targets disease causing bacterium

When we acquire diarrhea on a vacation, it is often caused by a bacterial infection. Now a Danish research team is working on a new type of vaccine design targeting the disease causing bacterium - if it works it may very well revolutionize not only the prevention of this disease, but also offer protection against other pathogens with a heavy disease burden such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis and antibiotic-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). [More]
UT Southwestern microbiologists identify key gut bacteria that promotes foodborne infections

UT Southwestern microbiologists identify key gut bacteria that promotes foodborne infections

UT Southwestern Medical Center microbiologists have identified key bacteria in the gut whose resources are hijacked to spread harmful foodborne E. coli infections and other intestinal illnesses. [More]