Diphtheria News and Research RSS Feed - Diphtheria News and Research

Diphtheria is a disease caused by a bacterium, Corynebacterium diphtheriae, that usually affects the tonsils, throat, nose and/or skin. It is passed from person to person by droplet transmission, usually by breathing in diphtheria bacteria after an infected person has coughed or sneezed. Although diphtheria disease is rare in the U.S., it appears that C diphtheriae continues to circulate in areas of the country with previously endemic diphtheria. Diphtheria also occurs in many other parts of the world.
FDA expands age indication of Adacel vaccine for immunization against tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis

FDA expands age indication of Adacel vaccine for immunization against tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis

Sanofi Pasteur, the vaccines division of Sanofi, announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has expanded the approved age indication of AdacelĀ® (Tetanus Toxoid, Reduced Diphtheria Toxoid and Acellular Pertussis Vaccine Adsorbed; Tdap) for active booster immunization for the prevention of tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis as a single dose in persons 10 through 64 years of age. [More]
Researchers find 69% rise in pertussis vaccination rate among new mothers

Researchers find 69% rise in pertussis vaccination rate among new mothers

Changing the hospital orders for women who have just delivered a child led to a 69% increase in the new mothers' pertussis vaccination rate, providing protection for themselves and their newborns against the disease, commonly known as whooping cough, according to a study in the March issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology. [More]

Researchers produce extremely accurate and detailed images of "toxic injections"

Bacteria have developed many different ways of smuggling their toxic cargo into cells. Tripartite Tc toxin complexes, which are used by bacteria like the plague pathogen Yersinia pestis and the insect pathogen Photorhabdus luminescens, are particularly unusual. [More]
New approach for delivering vaccines and for stimulating body's immune system to attack tumors

New approach for delivering vaccines and for stimulating body's immune system to attack tumors

Many vaccines, including those for influenza, polio, and measles, consist of a killed or disabled version of a virus. However, for certain diseases, this type of vaccine is ineffective, or just too risky. [More]
Research roundup: Examining readmissions; easing doctor burnout

Research roundup: Examining readmissions; easing doctor burnout

Despite massive early IT problems, exchange enrollment is accelerating rapidly. While enrollment may not reach 7 million by the end of March, we expect at least 5 million to have enrolled by the close of the initial open-enrollment period. If enrollment falls far short, HHS could extend open enrollment for a fixed period to reach its 7 million target. ... We project that 5 million new beneficiaries will be covered by Medicaid and the Children's Health Insurance Program by the end of 2014. Medicaid managed-care enrollment of non-dual beneficiaries will increase by 20 percent from 2013 to 2014 and by 38 percent from 2013 to 2016. We expect that 75 percent of non-dual Medicaid beneficiaries will be covered by Managed Care Organizations starting in 2015, up from 63 percent in 2012 (Feb. 2014). [More]
Elusive progenitor cells that give rise to ILCs identified in fetal liver and bone marrow of mice

Elusive progenitor cells that give rise to ILCs identified in fetal liver and bone marrow of mice

The elusive progenitor cells that give rise to innate lymphoid cells-a recently discovered group of infection-fighting white blood cells-have been identified in fetal liver and adult bone marrow of mice, researchers from the University of Chicago report early online in the journal Nature. [More]
Scientists establish a goal of creating vaccine gene chip to speed up vaccine testing

Scientists establish a goal of creating vaccine gene chip to speed up vaccine testing

Testing the efficacy of vaccines in clinical trials takes years, even decades. Yet challenging infections like HIV, malaria and dengue are striking today. To speed up vaccine testing, scientists at the Emory Vaccine Center have established a goal of creating a "vaccine gene chip." [More]
MassBiologics gets FDA orphan drug designation for MBL-HCV1 antibody

MassBiologics gets FDA orphan drug designation for MBL-HCV1 antibody

MassBiologics of the University of Massachusetts Medical School has received an orphan drug designation from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for MBL-HCV1, a monoclonal antibody developed to prevent hepatitis C virus recurrence in patients receiving a liver transplant. [More]
European Commission approves updated label of Prevenar 13 for high risk pneumococcal disease

European Commission approves updated label of Prevenar 13 for high risk pneumococcal disease

Pfizer Inc. (NYSE:PFE) announced today that the European Commission approved updates to the Summary of Product Characteristics (SmPC) for the company's pneumococcal conjugate vaccine Prevenar 13* (pneumococcal polysaccharide conjugate vaccine [13-valent, adsorbed]), regarding its use in certain populations at high risk of pneumococcal disease. [More]

Abortion of female fetuses in northern India results in gender imbalance

Modern ultrasound technology and economic pressure leads to female fetuses in the Ballabgarh area of northern India being aborted more often than male fetuses. Additionally, girls up to the age of five die more frequently than boys, which results in a gender imbalance in the area, according to Anand Krishnan, MD and doctoral candidate at Ume- University, who defends his thesis on 11 October. [More]
New report shows 6.6 million children under 5 died in 2012

New report shows 6.6 million children under 5 died in 2012

In 2012, approximately 6.6 million children worldwide - 18 000 children per day - died before reaching their fifth birthday, according to a new report released today by UNICEF, WHO, the World Bank Group and the United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs/Population Division. This is roughly half the number of under-fives who died in 1990, when more than 12 million children died. [More]
Health care providers are missing opportunities to improve teens' vaccination coverage

Health care providers are missing opportunities to improve teens' vaccination coverage

Health care providers are missing opportunities to improve teens' vaccination coverage, reports a new study in the Journal of Adolescent Health. [More]
Pfizer's Prevenar 13 receives European approval to include adults for prevention of invasive disease

Pfizer's Prevenar 13 receives European approval to include adults for prevention of invasive disease

Pfizer Inc. announced today the company's pneumococcal conjugate vaccine, Prevenar 13 (pneumococcal polysaccharide conjugate vaccine [13-valent, adsorbed]), received European approval for an expanded indication to include adults aged 18 to 49 years for active immunization for the prevention of invasive disease caused by vaccine-type Streptococcus pneumoniae (S. pneumoniae). [More]
Report highlights successes in improving maternal health, reducing child mortality

Report highlights successes in improving maternal health, reducing child mortality

Rapid expansion of programs to prevent HIV transmission to babies and vaccinate children show how results can be achieved in relatively little time. [More]
Somalia launches pentavalent vaccine with support from GAVI, UNICEF, WHO

Somalia launches pentavalent vaccine with support from GAVI, UNICEF, WHO

"Coinciding with World Immunization Week, the Somali government announced on 24 April its intention to vaccinate all children under the age of one with a new five-in-one vaccine, known as a pentavalent vaccine, funded by the GAVI Alliance, with [UNICEF] and the [WHO] as implementing partners," IRIN reports. [More]
Pfizer reports that Prevenar 13 Phase 3 study meets all primary, secondary objectives

Pfizer reports that Prevenar 13 Phase 3 study meets all primary, secondary objectives

Pfizer Inc. presented today the results from a Phase 3 study investigating immunogenicity, tolerability and safety of Prevenar 13 (Pneumococcal polysaccharide conjugate vaccine [13-valent, adsorbed]) in adults 18 to 49 years of age. [More]

Indian drug supplier cuts price of 5-in-1 childhood vaccine for GAVI Alliance; Groups highlight World Immunization Week

"The cost of immunizing children in developing countries with a five-in-one vaccine is set to fall after a deal by an Indian supplier to slash the price it charges the GAVI global vaccines group," Reuters reports. [More]

Global experts highlight strategies to immunize more children

In advance of World Immunization Week, global experts are highlighting strategies to further advance progress on the Global Vaccine Action Plan that was endorsed by the World Health Assembly, 2012. [More]

National Jewish Health researchers unravel mystery of adjuvants

Aluminum salts, or alum, have been injected into billions of people as an adjuvant to make vaccines more effective. [More]

2 in 5 parents believe HPV vaccine is unnecessary

A rising percentage of parents say they won't have their teen daughters vaccinated to protect against the human papilloma virus, even though physicians are increasingly recommending adolescent vaccinations, a study by Mayo Clinic and others shows. [More]