Dopamine News and Research RSS Feed - Dopamine News and Research

Dopamine is a hormone and neurotransmitter occurring in a wide variety of animals, including both vertebrates and invertebrates. In the brain, this phenethylamine functions as a neurotransmitter, activating the five types of dopamine receptors — D1, D2, D3, D4 and D5, and their variants. Dopamine is produced in several areas of the brain, including the substantia nigra and the ventral tegmental area. Dopamine is also a neurohormone released by the hypothalamus. Its main function as a hormone is to inhibit the release of prolactin from the anterior lobe of the pituitary. Dopamine has many functions in the brain, including important roles in behavior and cognition, motor activity, motivation and reward, inhibition of prolactin production (involved in lactation), sleep, mood, attention, and learning. Dopaminergic neurons (i.e., neurons whose primary neurotransmitter is dopamine) are present chiefly in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) of the midbrain, substantia nigra pars compacta, and arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus.
Dampened reward response tied to schizophrenia risk

Dampened reward response tied to schizophrenia risk

The striatal hypoactivation during reward anticipation seen in patients with schizophrenia is also present in their unaffected first-degree relatives, research shows. [More]
Parkinson disease patients with higher CSF experience faster cognitive decline

Parkinson disease patients with higher CSF experience faster cognitive decline

Counterintuitive Findings Offer New Insights into Parkinson Disease Pathology, According to New Research Published in The American Journal of Pathology [More]

NeuroDerm enrolls patients in second ND0612 Phase II clinical trial for treatment of Parkinson's disease

NeuroDerm, Ltd. announced today that enrollment of patients is ongoing in its second Phase II clinical trial of ND0612, a novel drug formulation for the treatment of Parkinson's disease. ND0612 is a proprietary levodopa/carbidopa liquid formulation under development for continuous subcutaneous administration through a patch pump. It is designed to provide steady levodopa blood levels for the treatment of Parkinson's disease. [More]
FDA-approved anti-psychotic drugs possess tumor-killing activity against glioblastoma

FDA-approved anti-psychotic drugs possess tumor-killing activity against glioblastoma

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have discovered that FDA-approved anti-psychotic drugs possess tumor-killing activity against the most aggressive form of primary brain cancer, glioblastoma. The finding was published in this week's online edition of Oncotarget. [More]

New hydrogel actuator has potential to interact safely with living tissues

Protein from a small, tasty mollusk inspired Michigan Technological University's Bruce P. Lee to invent a new type of hydrogel actuator. [More]
Ultra-high-field MRI provides detailed views of brain area implicated in Parkinson's disease

Ultra-high-field MRI provides detailed views of brain area implicated in Parkinson's disease

New research shows that ultra-high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides detailed views of a brain area implicated in Parkinson's disease, possibly leading to earlier detection of a condition that affects millions worldwide. The results of this research are published online in the journal Radiology. [More]
Georgia Regents Medical Center explores new treatment for Parkinson's disease-related constipation

Georgia Regents Medical Center explores new treatment for Parkinson's disease-related constipation

Georgia Regents Medical Center is among about a dozen centers nationally exploring the potential of a new drug that may offer relief to people with Parkinson's who have failed standard approaches to treating constipation. [More]
Intra-Cellular Therapies initiates Phase I/II clinical trial to evaluate pharmacokinetics in patients with dementia

Intra-Cellular Therapies initiates Phase I/II clinical trial to evaluate pharmacokinetics in patients with dementia

Intra-Cellular Therapies, Inc., a biopharmaceutical company focused on the development of therapeutics for central nervous system (CNS) disorders, today announced the initiation of ITI-007-200, a Phase I/II clinical trial designed to evaluate the safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics of low doses of its lead drug candidate, ITI-007, in healthy geriatric subjects and in patients with dementia, including Alzheimer's disease. [More]
New molecule fluorogenic probe for rapid assessment of individual's risk for Parkinson's disease

New molecule fluorogenic probe for rapid assessment of individual's risk for Parkinson's disease

A team of researchers from National University of Singapore (NUS) have created the first two-photon, small molecule fluorogenic probe that can serve as a useful tool for the rapid assessment of an individual's potential risk for Parkinson's disease. [More]

Goal: Therapies for hearing loss and communications problems

Research scientist Christine Portfors will study how the brain chemical dopamine influences hearing with support from the National Institutes of Health. The work may ultimately lead to better therapies for people with hearing loss and communication problems. [More]
New research finds direct connection between acupuncture and processes that alleviate sepsis

New research finds direct connection between acupuncture and processes that alleviate sepsis

When acupuncture first became popular in the western hemisphere it had its doubters. It still does. But over time, through detailed observation, scientists have produced real evidence that ancient Chinese practitioners of the medical arts were onto something. [More]

Frequently moving schools during childhood can increase risk of psychotic symptoms in later years

Researchers at Warwick Medical School have shown that frequently moving schools during childhood can increase the risk of psychotic symptoms in later years. [More]
Study examines brain activity of alcohol-dependent women

Study examines brain activity of alcohol-dependent women

A new Indiana University study that examines the brain activity of alcohol-dependent women compared to women who were not addicted found stark and surprising differences, leading to intriguing questions about brain network functions of addicted women as they make risky decisions about when and what to drink. [More]
FDA grants accelerated approval to NORTHERA (droxidopa) for patients with symptomatic NOH

FDA grants accelerated approval to NORTHERA (droxidopa) for patients with symptomatic NOH

Chelsea Therapeutics International, Ltd. today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration granted accelerated approval of NORTHERA (droxidopa) for the treatment of symptomatic neurogenic orthostatic hypotension (NOH). NORTHERA is the first and only therapy approved by the FDA which demonstrates symptomatic benefit in patients with NOH. [More]

New treatments for depression on the horizon

New insights into the physiological causes of depression are leading to treatments beyond common antidepressants such as Prozac and Zoloft, researchers are reporting in the in the journal Current Psychiatry. [More]
FDA-approved drug pregabalin effectively treats RLS symptoms with less side effects

FDA-approved drug pregabalin effectively treats RLS symptoms with less side effects

A report in the Feb. 13 New England Journal of Medicine confirms previous studies suggesting that long-term treatment with the type of drugs commonly prescribed to treat restless leg syndrome (RLS) can cause a serious worsening of the condition in some patients. [More]

Common mutations produce typical schizophrenia brain changes

Mutations in dopamine-related genes have a dose-response effect on prefrontal activation during emotional response inhibition in healthy adults, a study shows. [More]

Novel compound appears to protect mice against movement problems associated with PD

Scientists report that they have developed a novel compound that appears to protect mice against developing movement problems associated with Parkinson's disease (PD). The research, which could one day in the future translate into a therapy that could halt the progression of PD and thereby prevent the symptoms of the disease, appears in ACS' Journal of Medicinal Chemistry. [More]

Falling in love causes body to release feel-good chemicals that trigger specific physical reactions

Getting struck by Cupid's arrow may very well take your breath away and make your heart go pitter-patter this Valentine's Day, reports sexual wellness specialists at Loyola University Health System. [More]

Doctor offers tips for fans who suddenly have to face months without football

After the final play of the Super Bowl, millions of fans will go through withdrawal symptoms from not being able to watch football for months. [More]