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Many teens still ignorant of significant physical danger posed by legal drugs

Many teens still ignorant of significant physical danger posed by legal drugs

Legal drugs such as OxyContin now kill more people than heroin and cocaine combined. While awareness of the dangers of illegal drugs has increased, many teens are still ignorant of the significant physical danger posed by legally prescribed drugs, according to a new study in Journal of Public Policy & Marketing. [More]
Appriss partners with The MetroHealth System to fight drug abuse

Appriss partners with The MetroHealth System to fight drug abuse

Appriss Inc., a leading technology provider for risk assessment and analytics in public safety and healthcare, announced its partnership with The MetroHealth System in Ohio to fight drug abuse, diversion and addiction where it's needed most – at the prescribing level. [More]
Race and gender may influence use of drugs, drinking and smoking among teens

Race and gender may influence use of drugs, drinking and smoking among teens

Cigarette use among white teenagers is substantially higher than among black and Hispanic teenagers, especially at 18 years old, according to Penn State researchers. Alcohol and marijuana use are also higher in white teenagers, and the numbers continue to increase until age 20. Throughout their 20s, blacks and Hispanics are more likely to pick up a cigarette-smoking habit, while the numbers start to decrease for whites. [More]
Study finds that reformulated OxyContin forces some drug abusers to switch to heroin

Study finds that reformulated OxyContin forces some drug abusers to switch to heroin

A reformulation of OxyContin that makes it harder to abuse has curtailed the drug's illicit use. But some 25 percent of drug abusers entering rehab said they still abused the prescription painkiller despite package labeling that emphasizes its abuse-deterrent properties, new research indicates. [More]
People who quit smoking have improved metabolic effects, new study finds

People who quit smoking have improved metabolic effects, new study finds

People who quit smoking have improved metabolic effects, a new study finds. The results will be presented in a poster Thursday, March 5, at ENDO 2015, the annual meeting of the Endocrine Society in San Diego. [More]
Survey: Only 53% of primary care physicians use state's prescription drug monitoring programs

Survey: Only 53% of primary care physicians use state's prescription drug monitoring programs

In a new survey, researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health found that physicians report relatively high awareness of state databases that track drug prescriptions but more than one-fifth indicated they were not aware of their state's program at all. [More]
New study examines risk factors for use of synthetic marijuana among teens

New study examines risk factors for use of synthetic marijuana among teens

Synthetic cannabinoids ("synthetic marijuana"), with names like Spice, K2, Scooby Doo and hundreds of others, are often sold as a "legal" alternative to marijuana. Often perceived as a safe legal alternative to illicit drug use, synthetic marijuana use was associated with 11,561 reports of poisonings in the United States between January 2009 and April 2012. [More]
Physicians urge households to add 'clean my medicine cabinet' to Spring cleaning chores list

Physicians urge households to add 'clean my medicine cabinet' to Spring cleaning chores list

After marijuana and alcohol, the most commonly abused drugs by those over the age of 14 are prescription and over-the-counter medications. [More]
Study shows physical similarities, differences between extrovert types in the brain

Study shows physical similarities, differences between extrovert types in the brain

Everyday experience and psychological studies alike tell us that there are two different types of extroverts: The gregarious "people-persons" who find reward in sharing affection and affiliation with others, and the ambitious "go-getters" who flash those bright-white smiles in their pursuit of achievement and leadership agendas. [More]
Study suggests that strong beliefs can treat nicotine addiction

Study suggests that strong beliefs can treat nicotine addiction

Two identical cigarettes led to a discovery by scientists at the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute. Study participants inhaled nicotine, yet they showed significantly different brain activity. Why the difference? Some subjects were told their cigarettes were nicotine free. [More]
Epigenome plays significant part in embryonic development

Epigenome plays significant part in embryonic development

The early stages of embryonic development shape our cells and tissues for life. It is during this time that our newly formed cells are transformed into heart, skin, nerve or other cell types. Scientists are finding that this process is largely controlled not by the genome, but by the epigenome, chemical markers on DNA that tell cells when to turn genes on and off. [More]
Researchers assemble comprehensive map of human epigenome

Researchers assemble comprehensive map of human epigenome

Virtually every cell in the body carries an identical genome. But how is it possible that each of the body's 200 different types of specialized cells - in the heart, brain, bone, skin and elsewhere - develops from the same DNA instruction book? [More]
Study evaluates recent sleep trends for U.S. adolescents

Study evaluates recent sleep trends for U.S. adolescents

Sufficient sleep is critical for adolescent health, yet the number of hours slept per night has decreased among teenagers in the United States over the last 20 years. A study by researchers at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health found that female students, racial/ethnic minorities, and students of lower socioeconomic status are particularly affected, with teens in these categories less likely to report regularly getting seven or more hours of sleep each night compared with their male counterparts, non-Hispanic white teenagers, and students of higher socioeconomic status, respectively. [More]
Study shows how cannabidiol works within cells

Study shows how cannabidiol works within cells

A team of Stony Brook University researchers have identified fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) as intracellular transporters for two ingredients in marijuana, THC and CBD (cannabidiol). [More]
InterveXion receives federal grants for development of drug therapies to treat methamphetamine users

InterveXion receives federal grants for development of drug therapies to treat methamphetamine users

A University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences BioVentures startup company, InterveXion Therapeutics LLC, has received two federal grants totaling $14.5 million for development of drug therapies that can help methamphetamine drug abusers break their addiction. [More]
Despite growing shortage of donor hearts, surgeons, transplant centers reject marginal hearts

Despite growing shortage of donor hearts, surgeons, transplant centers reject marginal hearts

Surgeons and transplant centers nationwide increasingly have rejected hearts donated for transplantation despite a growing need for them, according to a new study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine. [More]
UC San Diego School of Medicine project receives 2015 Avant-Garde Award for HIV/AIDS Research

UC San Diego School of Medicine project receives 2015 Avant-Garde Award for HIV/AIDS Research

A University of California, San Diego School of Medicine project involving the creation of miniature models of the human brain - developed with stem cells - to study neurological disorders caused by HIV and methamphetamine use has been named one of five recipients of the 2015 Avant-Garde Award for HIV/AIDS Research from the National Institute on Drug Abuse. [More]
TUSM researchers awarded $7.4 million to study brain impairment in patients infected with HIV

TUSM researchers awarded $7.4 million to study brain impairment in patients infected with HIV

Researchers at Temple University School of Medicine have been awarded a $7.4 million, five-year grant from the National Institute on Drug Abuse to determine how cocaine and HIV-1 interact to cause brain impairment in patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus. [More]
Five researchers selected to receive 2015 Avant-Garde Award for HIV/AIDS Research

Five researchers selected to receive 2015 Avant-Garde Award for HIV/AIDS Research

With proposals ranging from innovative therapies to the development of unique organoid models of the brain, five scientists have been selected to receive the 2015 Avant-Garde Award for HIV/AIDS Research from the National Institute on Drug Abuse, part of the National Institutes of Health. The five scientists will each receive $500,000 per year for five years to support their research. [More]
CWRU researcher receives $3.9 million grant for HIV research

CWRU researcher receives $3.9 million grant for HIV research

A researcher at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine has been awarded $3.9 million to determine if the combination of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and drug abuse is a double kick in the gut, leading to organ damage throughout the body. [More]
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