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Depression may be a risk factor for Parkinson's disease, say Umeå University researchers

Depression may be a risk factor for Parkinson's disease, say Umeå University researchers

People with depression may be more likely to develop Parkinson's disease, according to a large study by researchers at Umeå University, Sweden, published on 20 May, 2015, in the online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
HIV infections continue to rise among YMSM despite prevention efforts

HIV infections continue to rise among YMSM despite prevention efforts

HIV infections continue to rise in a new generation of young, gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men (YMSM) despite three decades of HIV prevention as well as recent availability of biomedical technologies to prevent infection. [More]
New UCLA study finds Naltrexone drug as promising treatment for methamphetamine addiction

New UCLA study finds Naltrexone drug as promising treatment for methamphetamine addiction

A new study by UCLA researchers has found that Naltrexone, a drug used to treat alcoholism, may also be a promising treatment for addiction to methamphetamine. [More]
Twin Cities Orthopedics joins Deterra partnership program to reduce prescription drug abuse and misuse

Twin Cities Orthopedics joins Deterra partnership program to reduce prescription drug abuse and misuse

Verde Technologies announced that Golden Valley-based Twin Cities Orthopedics, the largest orthopedic group in Minnesota, has become its most recent partner in the fight against prescription drug abuse and misuse. [More]
New research project aims at preventing HIV, other blood-borne infections

New research project aims at preventing HIV, other blood-borne infections

Research consistently shows that policing practices, such as confiscating or breaking needles, are key factors in the HIV epidemic among persons who inject drugs. Police officers themselves are also at risk of acquiring HIV or viral hepatitis if they experience needle-stick injuries on the job — a significant source of anxiety and staff turn-over. [More]
APS honors recipients of Clinical Centers of Excellence in Pain Management Awards

APS honors recipients of Clinical Centers of Excellence in Pain Management Awards

The American Pain Society today honored the recipients of its annual Clinical Centers of Excellence in Pain Management Awards recognizing the nation's outstanding pain care centers. Five multidisciplinary pain programs were recognized. [More]
APS announces recipients of prestigious achievement awards during annual scientific meeting

APS announces recipients of prestigious achievement awards during annual scientific meeting

The American Pain Society (APS), www.americanpainsociety.org, today announced the recipients of its prestigious achievement awards during the organization's annual scientific meeting. [More]
Secondhand exposure to cannabis smoke under extreme conditions impairs cognitive performance

Secondhand exposure to cannabis smoke under extreme conditions impairs cognitive performance

Secondhand exposure to cannabis smoke under "extreme conditions," such as an unventilated room or enclosed vehicle, can cause nonsmokers to feel the effects of the drug, have minor problems with memory and coordination, and in some cases test positive for the drug in a urinalysis. [More]
Discovery paves way for developing treatments for people addicted to cocaine, amphetamines

Discovery paves way for developing treatments for people addicted to cocaine, amphetamines

In a major advance in the field of neuropsychiatry, researchers in the Vollum Institute at Oregon Health & Science University have illuminated how cocaine and amphetamines disrupt the normal functioning of the dopamine transporter in the brain. [More]
Study sheds light on specific roles for dopamine in reward process

Study sheds light on specific roles for dopamine in reward process

Dopamine is the chemical messenger in the brain most closely associated with pleasure and reward. Recent scientific advances now shed light on precise roles for dopamine in the reward process. [More]

Holistic approach to preventing sexual assault among college students

One in five college students experiences sexual assault during their college career, and a New York-based health and wellness company is working to help change that. National Health Promotion Associates has been awarded a grant from the National Institutes of Health to develop and evaluate an effective approach to preventing sexual violence. [More]
Neonatal abstinence syndrome on the rise in U.S.

Neonatal abstinence syndrome on the rise in U.S.

The number of infants born in the United States with drug withdrawal symptoms, also known as neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS), nearly doubled in a four-year period. By 2012, one infant was born every 25 minutes in the U.S. with the syndrome, accounting for $1.5 billion in annual health care charges, according to a new Vanderbilt study published in the Journal of Perinatology. [More]
New TSRI study points to promising new therapeutic target for Alzheimer's disease

New TSRI study points to promising new therapeutic target for Alzheimer's disease

Taking a new approach, scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have uncovered some surprising details of a group of compounds that have shown significant potential in stimulating the growth of brain cells and memory restoration in animal models that mimic Alzheimer's disease. [More]
Emergency department-initiated treatment better than referrals for opioid-dependent patients

Emergency department-initiated treatment better than referrals for opioid-dependent patients

Yale researchers conducted the first known randomized trial comparing three treatment strategies for opioid-dependent patients receiving emergency care. They found that patients given the medication buprenorphine were more likely to engage in addiction treatment and reduce their illicit opioid use. [More]
Children bullied by peers face worse long-term mental health problems than those who are maltreated

Children bullied by peers face worse long-term mental health problems than those who are maltreated

A new study published in The Lancet Psychiatry shows that children who have been bullied by peers suffer worse in the longer term than those who have been maltreated by adults. [More]

New study reveals that psychiatric disorders don't predict future violent behavior

Most psychiatric disorders - including depression -- do not predict future violent behavior, according to new Northwestern Medicine longitudinal study of delinquent youth. The only exception is substance abuse and dependence. [More]
UC Irvine professor explores the link between autism and ADHD

UC Irvine professor explores the link between autism and ADHD

For the better part of the last decade, a growing body of research has been revealing more and more similarities between attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and autism. [More]
New study finds that breastfeeding may help reduce smoking

New study finds that breastfeeding may help reduce smoking

While a large number of women quit or reduce smoking upon pregnancy recognition, many resume smoking postpartum. Previous research has estimated that approximately 70% of women who quit smoking during pregnancy relapse within the first year after childbirth, and of those who relapse, 67% resume smoking by three months, and up to 90% by six months. [More]
New study shows nicotine exposure promotes alcohol dependence

New study shows nicotine exposure promotes alcohol dependence

Why do smokers have a five to ten times greater risk of developing alcohol dependence than nonsmokers? Do smokers have a greater tendency toward addiction in general or does nicotine somehow reinforce alcohol consumption? Now, a study led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute helps provide insight into these questions, showing that, in rat models, nicotine exposure actually promotes alcohol dependence. [More]
Oxycodone-related deaths drop 25% after implementation of Prescription Drug Monitoring Program

Oxycodone-related deaths drop 25% after implementation of Prescription Drug Monitoring Program

Oxycodone-related deaths dropped 25 percent after Florida implemented its Prescription Drug Monitoring Program in late 2011 as part of its response to the state's prescription drug abuse epidemic, according to a team of UF Health researchers. The drop in fatalities could stem from the number of health care providers who used the program's database to monitor controlled substance prescriptions. [More]
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