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Characterizing the brain, cell by cell

Characterizing the brain, cell by cell

My group develops approaches to study cell-to-cell signaling in the brain – how the cells of the brain talk to each other. The brain is heterogeneous, probably more so than any other organ in our body, and many of its functions depend on the unique characteristics of these cells. [More]
Frequent online social interactions may mitigate symptoms of game addiction in teenagers

Frequent online social interactions may mitigate symptoms of game addiction in teenagers

Teenagers who play video games for more than four hours a day suffer from symptoms of depression, but frequent use of social media and instant messaging may mitigate symptoms of game addiction in these teens, new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health-led research suggests. [More]
Reducing cocaine use can potentially reverse coronary atherosclerosis

Reducing cocaine use can potentially reverse coronary atherosclerosis

People who use cocaine regularly are at high risk of coronary artery disease. A study in the Journal of Addiction Medicine, the official journal of the American Society of Addiction Medicine, reports that stopping or reducing cocaine use can potentially reverse the process of coronary atherosclerosis. The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer. [More]
Chronic consumption of western diet leads to overeating and obesity, new research shows

Chronic consumption of western diet leads to overeating and obesity, new research shows

More than two in three adults in the United States are considered overweight or obese, with substantial biomedical and clinical evidence suggesting that chronic overconsumption of a "western diet" - foods consisting high levels of sugars and fats - is a major cause of this epidemic. [More]
Hormonal fluctuations make women more sensitive to addictive properties of cocaine, study reveals

Hormonal fluctuations make women more sensitive to addictive properties of cocaine, study reveals

Hormonal fluctuations women undergo make them particularly sensitive, compared to men, to the addictive properties of cocaine, according to a study conducted at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published January 10 in the journal Nature Communications. [More]
Researchers develop novel tests that could improve treatment for heart failure patients

Researchers develop novel tests that could improve treatment for heart failure patients

For the first time, researchers have developed tests that could improve treatment for heart failure patients by diagnosing the condition with greater accuracy, as well as by detecting the onset of congestive heart failure earlier. [More]
Study identifies factors linked to disengagement from treatment for opioid use disorder

Study identifies factors linked to disengagement from treatment for opioid use disorder

Individuals with opioid use disorder who are treated with buprenorphine, a commonly prescribed drug to treat addiction, are more likely to disengage from treatment programs if they are black or Hispanic, unemployed, or have hepatitis C according to a study published online in the Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment. [More]
New TSRI study sheds light on how the brain stores memories

New TSRI study sheds light on how the brain stores memories

A new study led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) sheds light on how the brain stores memories. [More]
Researchers warn about taking psilocybin-containing ‘magic mushrooms’

Researchers warn about taking psilocybin-containing ‘magic mushrooms’

In a survey of almost 2,000 people who said they had had a past negative experience when taking psilocybin-containing "magic mushrooms," Johns Hopkins researchers say that more than 10 percent believed their worst "bad trip" had put themselves or others in harm's way, and a substantial majority called their most distressing episode one of the top 10 biggest challenges of their lives. [More]
Legalization of recreational marijuana changes teens' use and perceptions of marijuana

Legalization of recreational marijuana changes teens' use and perceptions of marijuana

Marijuana use significantly increased and its perceived harm decreased among eighth- and 10th-graders in Washington state following enactment of recreational marijuana laws, according to a UC Davis and Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health to be published online in JAMA Pediatrics. [More]
New UCLA research recommends community clinics to routinely screen for misuse of drugs

New UCLA research recommends community clinics to routinely screen for misuse of drugs

The misuse of both prescription and illicit drugs is so prevalent in Tijuana and East Los Angeles that community clinics in those areas should routinely, though discreetly, screen for it, according to new UCLA research. [More]
New study finds rise in past-month marijuana use among reproductive-aged women

New study finds rise in past-month marijuana use among reproductive-aged women

A new study by researchers at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health found that the prevalence of past-month marijuana use among reproductive-aged women rose from 2.4 percent in 2002 to 3.9 percent in 2014, an increase of 62 percent. [More]
Woman’s history of drug use can help predict risk of postpartum stress and anxiety

Woman’s history of drug use can help predict risk of postpartum stress and anxiety

New research from North Carolina State University and the University of British Columbia finds that a woman's lifetime history of drug use can help predict whether the woman will suffer from problems with stress and anxiety after childbirth. [More]
Researchers developing opioid vaccines to help prevent overdose fatalities

Researchers developing opioid vaccines to help prevent overdose fatalities

In 2014, the number of deaths from opioid overdoses in the U.S. jumped to its highest level on record. The spike brought national attention to the epidemic and the awareness that new interventions are needed. [More]
Study examines link between employment status and nonmedical use of prescription opioids

Study examines link between employment status and nonmedical use of prescription opioids

Researchers at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health found that employment status is a factor in nonmedical use of prescription opioids and prescription stimulants. [More]
Study finds high rates of marijuana use among Baby Boomers

Study finds high rates of marijuana use among Baby Boomers

The recent legalization of recreational marijuana (cannabis) use in California, Colorado, and Washington reflect the sweeping changes in the attitudes and perceptions towards marijuana use in the United States. [More]
Hallucinogenic drug offers relief for people with cancer-related anxiety or depression

Hallucinogenic drug offers relief for people with cancer-related anxiety or depression

In a small double-blind study, Johns Hopkins researchers report that a substantial majority of people suffering cancer-related anxiety or depression found considerable relief for up to six months from a single large dose of psilocybin -- the active compound in hallucinogenic "magic mushrooms." [More]
Researcher to study ethical complexities of involving teens at high risk for HIV in prevention trials

Researcher to study ethical complexities of involving teens at high risk for HIV in prevention trials

An Indiana University nursing researcher has been awarded $1.1 million to study the ethical complexities of involving adolescents ages 14-17 at high risk for HIV in biomedical prevention trials. [More]
TSRI scientists discover potential drug candidate to suppress pain and itch

TSRI scientists discover potential drug candidate to suppress pain and itch

In a new study, scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute have identified a possible drug candidate that suppresses pain and itch in animal models. [More]
New vaccine shows potential to decrease risk of fatal opioid overdose

New vaccine shows potential to decrease risk of fatal opioid overdose

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have developed a vaccine that blocks the pain-numbing effects of the opioid drugs oxycodone and hydrocodone in animal models. [More]
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