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Researcher develops novel IBT to help opioid-dependent Vermonters

Opioid dependence - addiction to heroin and prescription painkillers - has reached epidemic levels across the country, with treatment waitlists also at an all-time high. [More]
TSRI scientists to study effects of pain medication on prenatal brain development

TSRI scientists to study effects of pain medication on prenatal brain development

Scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have been awarded a $472,500 Cutting Edge Basic Research Award (CEBRA) by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) of the National Institutes of Health to study models of the brain development of newborns who have been exposed-and become addicted-to prescription pain medication while still in the womb. [More]

Professor receives $1.7M NIH grant to explore novel treatments for chronic methamphetamine users

A Wayne State University professor recently received a nearly $1.7 million grant from the National Institutes of Drug Abuse of the National Institutes of Health to explore whether proteasome and parkin — two components of the ubiquitin-proteasome system — are potential pharmaceutical drug targets that can be manipulated to promote survival and recovery of dopaminergic terminals after binge and chronic administration of toxic doses of methamphetamine. [More]

Treatment for opioid overdose now available for use by non-medical personnel

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved the first naloxone treatment specifically designed to be given by family members or caregivers to treat a person with opioid overdose. [More]
Ketamine offers novel treatment for patients with severe depression

Ketamine offers novel treatment for patients with severe depression

New data show ketamine (a drug widely used for anaesthesia and pain relief) has a rapid antidepressant effect in some patients with severe depression. The first UK study of ketamine intravenous infusions in people with treatment-resistant depression was conducted by the Oxford Health NHS Foundation Trust and the University of Oxford. [More]
Study shows important parallels between epidemic of HIV/AIDS and opioid addiction

Study shows important parallels between epidemic of HIV/AIDS and opioid addiction

​There are important parallels between the early years of the HIV/AIDS epidemic and the current epidemic of opioid addiction - ones that could trigger a significant shift in opioid addiction prevention, diagnosis and treatment. [More]

Educational intervention program for children reduces aggressive behavior later in life

An educational intervention program for children between kindergarten and 10th grade, known as Fast Track, reduces aggressive behavior later in life, according to research published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. [More]
Study finds that baclofen drug has potential to prevent cocaine relapse

Study finds that baclofen drug has potential to prevent cocaine relapse

Relapse is the most painful and expensive feature of drug addiction-even after addicted individuals have been drug-free for months or years, the likelihood of sliding back into the habit remains high. The National Institute on Drug Abuse estimates that 40 to 60 percent of addicted individuals will relapse, and in some studies the rates are as high as 80 percent at six months after treatment. [More]

Consumer Healthcare Products Association thanks Washington State gov for signing SSHB 2163 bill

The Consumer Healthcare Products Association thanks Washington State Governor Jay Inslee for signing SSHB 2163 and Rep. Paul Harris for the initial introduction of the legislation. [More]

Viewpoints: NRA shouldn't derail Surgeon General nominee; Democrats need to stand up for health law

The National Rifle Association has mounted an outrageous campaign to torpedo President Obama's nomination of an outstanding young doctor to be the next surgeon general of the United States because of his attitudes on gun control. [More]
Children with prenatal methamphetamine exposure 2.8 times more likely to have cognitive problem

Children with prenatal methamphetamine exposure 2.8 times more likely to have cognitive problem

In the only long-term, National Institutes of Health-funded study of prenatal methamphetamine exposure and child outcome, researchers found youngsters exposed to the potent illegal drug before birth had increased cognitive problems at age 7.5 years, highlighting the need for early intervention to improve academic outcomes and reduce the potential for negative behaviors, according to the study published online by The Journal of Pediatrics. [More]
Programs for heterosexuals who use drugs linked with subsequent lower rates of AIDS incidence

Programs for heterosexuals who use drugs linked with subsequent lower rates of AIDS incidence

Although community network studies show that sexual relationships occur between members of "risk groups" -- men who have sex with other men (MSM), people who inject drugs (PWID), non-injection drug users (NIDU) -- and heterosexuals, researchers at New York University's Center for Drug Use and HIV Research (CDUHR) note that little research has been done to help explain how HIV epidemics and programs in one population affect others and how to reduce the risks of transmission. [More]

Use of cocaine drops and marijuana increases across the United States

The use of cocaine dropped sharply across the United States from 2006 to 2010, while the amount of marijuana consumed increased significantly during the same period, according to a new report. [More]
New research reveals how substance abuse problems take hold in returning veterans

New research reveals how substance abuse problems take hold in returning veterans

Of nearly 1 million veterans who receive opioids to treat painful conditions, more than half continue to consume opioids chronically or beyond 90 days, new research says. Results presented at the 30th Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Pain Medicine reported on a number of factors associated with opioid discontinuation with the goal of understanding how abuse problems take hold in returning veterans. [More]
Study: Thickness of brain's cortex linked with person's change in IQ

Study: Thickness of brain's cortex linked with person's change in IQ

Rate of change in the thickness of the brain's cortex is an important factor associated with a person's change in IQ, according to a collaborative study by scientists in five countries including researchers at the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital - The Neuro, at McGill University and the McGill University Health Centre. [More]
Alzheimer's drug pioneer to be awarded Israel Prize for Medicine

Alzheimer's drug pioneer to be awarded Israel Prize for Medicine

Israel's Minister of Education Shai Piron has announced that the Israel Prize for Medicine will be awarded to the Hebrew University of Jerusalem's Prof. Marta Weinstock-Rosin. A professor emeritus at the Hebrew University's School of Pharmacy-Institute for Drug Research in the Faculty of Medicine, Weinstock-Rosin is best known for developing Exelon, a blockbuster drug for the treatment of confusion and dementia related to Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. [More]
Overweight Group Health patients with hypertension benefit from 'pocket dietitian'

Overweight Group Health patients with hypertension benefit from 'pocket dietitian'

A rich chocolate cake is tempting you, but where is a dietitian when you need one? The e-Care for Heart Wellness study sought to solve this problem. In the study, Group Health patients who were overweight and had hypertension were more likely to have lost 10 pounds in six months if they had secure online access to a dietitian than if they received only information and usual care. The American Journal of Preventive Medicine published the e-Care study. [More]

Health reform gives people with history of jail time access to continuous health care

Under the Affordable Care Act, an estimated 4 million people who have spent time in jail will have better access to health coverage for conditions that might-if left untreated-result in higher health care costs and an increased risk of recidivism. [More]

WSU scientist receives grant to study effects of chronic methamphetamine on brain metabolism, sleep

WSU sleep scientist Jonathan Wisor has received a grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to study the effects of chronic methamphetamine use on brain metabolism and sleep. [More]
U.S study:10% of non-lifetime marijuana users report that they would try marijuana if legal

U.S study:10% of non-lifetime marijuana users report that they would try marijuana if legal

​National support for marijuana ("cannabis") legalization is increasing in the United States (US). Recreational use was recently legalized in the states of Colorado and Washington; other states across the country are expected to follow suit. [More]