E. coli News and Research RSS Feed - E. coli News and Research

E. coli or Escherichia coli is the name of a type of bacteria that lives in your intestines. Most types of E. coli are harmless. However, some types can make you sick and cause diarrhea. One type causes travelers' diarrhea. The worst type of E. coli causes bloody diarrhea, and can sometimes cause kidney failure and even death. These problems are most likely to occur in children and in adults with weak immune systems. You can get E. coli infections by eating foods containing the bacteria. To help avoid food poisoning and prevent infection, handle food safely. Cook meat well, wash fruits and vegetables before eating or cooking them, and avoid unpasteurized milk and juices. You can also get the infection by swallowing water in a swimming pool contaminated with human waste. Most cases of E. coli infection get better without treatment in 5 to 10 days.
Scientists insert metabolic pathway for carbon fixation and sugar production into E. coli bacterium

Scientists insert metabolic pathway for carbon fixation and sugar production into E. coli bacterium

All life on the planet relies, in one way or another, on a process called carbon fixation: the ability of plants, algae and certain bacteria to "pump" carbon dioxide (CO2) from the environment, add solar or other energy and turn it into the sugars that are the required starting point needed for life processes. [More]
Knocking out genes in E. coli affects stiffness, integrity of bacterial envelope

Knocking out genes in E. coli affects stiffness, integrity of bacterial envelope

An exhaustive look at how bacteria hold their ground and avoid getting pushed around by their environment shows how dozens of genes aid the essential job of protecting cells from popping when tensions run high. [More]
Portable biosensor can detect and amplify signal of harmful bacteria

Portable biosensor can detect and amplify signal of harmful bacteria

Washington State University researchers have developed a portable biosensor that makes it easier to detect harmful bacteria. [More]
New FcMBL-based pathogen-detecting assay could rapidly detect systemic infections

New FcMBL-based pathogen-detecting assay could rapidly detect systemic infections

To date, there are no methods that can quickly and accurately detect pathogens in blood to allow the diagnosis of systemic bloodstream infections that can lead to life-threatening sepsis. [More]
Cranberries can reduce symptomatic UTIs and avoid chronic suppressive antibiotics

Cranberries can reduce symptomatic UTIs and avoid chronic suppressive antibiotics

Today leading experts on infectious disease and urinary tract infections (UTIs) will gather in London to discuss the alarming state of antibiotic resistance, and present findings from a landmark study that conclusively shows that cranberries can be a nutritional approach to reducing symptomatic UTIs, and as a result, may be a useful strategy to decrease worldwide use of antibiotics. [More]
New electronic sensor can distinguish between dead and living bacteria cells

New electronic sensor can distinguish between dead and living bacteria cells

A new type of electronic sensor that might be used to quickly detect and classify bacteria for medical diagnostics and food safety has passed a key hurdle by distinguishing between dead and living bacteria cells. [More]
Tiny molecular scaffolding could be key to fight against antibiotic resistance

Tiny molecular scaffolding could be key to fight against antibiotic resistance

Tiny molecular scaffolding that joins molecules together could be the key to our battle against antibiotic resistance. Research published in Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry Letters shows that carbon nanodot scaffolding assembled with small molecules called polyamines can kill some dangerous drug-resistant bacteria, including Acinetobacter baumanii and Klebsiella pneumonia. [More]
Eppendorf launches new BioBLU 3f Single-Use Vessel for microbial fermentation

Eppendorf launches new BioBLU 3f Single-Use Vessel for microbial fermentation

Eppendorf expands its portfolio of rigid-wall single-use vessels for fermentation. [More]
OIST scientists reveal how big protein complex inside E. coli cells divide and multiply

OIST scientists reveal how big protein complex inside E. coli cells divide and multiply

Escherichia coli (E. coli) are bacteria that live all around and inside of us. Most E. coli are harmless, but some strains can cause illness, and can even, in extreme cases, be deadly. With recent outbreaks of E. coli around the world, there is a fear of acquiring an infection from these bacteria. [More]

First clinical trial to study use of Chinese Herbal Medicines in treating RUTIs

Researchers at the University of Southampton are to study the use of Chinese Herbal Medicines in treating recurrent urinary tract infections (RUTIs), in the first clinical trial of its kind in the UK. [More]
Researchers genetically modify microalgae to form complex molecules

Researchers genetically modify microalgae to form complex molecules

Researchers from Copenhagen Plant Science Centre at University of Copenhagen have succeeded in manipulating a strain of microalgae to form complex molecules to an unprecedented extent. [More]
Hydrogel-based rapid detection system may help early detection of E. coli in drinking water

Hydrogel-based rapid detection system may help early detection of E. coli in drinking water

Tragedies like the E. coli outbreak in Ontario's Walkerton in May 2000 could be averted today with a new invention by researchers at York University that can detect the deadly contaminant in drinking water early. [More]
Scientists uncover whole new way of treating antibiotic-resistant superbugs

Scientists uncover whole new way of treating antibiotic-resistant superbugs

Australian scientists may have found a way to stop deadly bacteria from infecting patients. The discovery could lead to a whole new way of treating antibiotic-resistant "superbugs". The researchers have uncovered what may be an Achilles heel on the bacteria cell membrane that could act as a potential novel drug target. [More]
Oxford Nanoimaging begins sales of desktop optical microscope

Oxford Nanoimaging begins sales of desktop optical microscope

Oxford Nanoimaging commence sales of an elegant desktop optical microscope capable of zooming in on objects as tiny as structures inside living cells. This super-resolution microscope will allow scientists to watch how individual molecules perform chemical reactions in real-time. [More]
Scientists identify new hots pots of antibiotic resistance

Scientists identify new hots pots of antibiotic resistance

Antibiotic-resistant bacteria most often are associated with hospitals and other health-care settings, but a new study indicates that chicken coops and sewage treatment plants also are hot spots of antibiotic resistance. [More]
MGH researchers develop device to rapidly diagnose health-care-associated infections

MGH researchers develop device to rapidly diagnose health-care-associated infections

A team of Massachusetts General Hospital investigators has developed a device with the potential of shortening the time required to rapidly diagnose pathogens responsible for health-care-associated infections from a couple of days to a matter of hours. [More]

Research shows spleen MZ B cells produce signaling proteins involved in inflammatory responses

The inability to adequately respond to infection can cause a whole-body state of inflammation known as sepsis. This can eventually lead to systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), and even death. [More]
Study shows syringe-like device acts as traffic cop directing bacteria to carry out infection

Study shows syringe-like device acts as traffic cop directing bacteria to carry out infection

A study has found that a syringe-like device used to invade intestinal cells also acts as a traffic cop -- directing bacteria where to go and thereby enabling them to efficiently carry out infection. [More]
Early exposure to pathogens may play pivotal role in immune system development

Early exposure to pathogens may play pivotal role in immune system development

Exposure to pathogens early in life is beneficial to the education and development of the human immune system. [More]
Probiotic supplements may help treat post-menopausal osteoporosis

Probiotic supplements may help treat post-menopausal osteoporosis

Probiotic supplements protected female mice from the loss of bone density that occurs after having their ovaries removed, researchers at Emory University School of Medicine and Georgia State University have shown. [More]
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