E. coli News and Research RSS Feed - E. coli News and Research

E. coli or Escherichia coli is the name of a type of bacteria that lives in your intestines. Most types of E. coli are harmless. However, some types can make you sick and cause diarrhea. One type causes travelers' diarrhea. The worst type of E. coli causes bloody diarrhea, and can sometimes cause kidney failure and even death. These problems are most likely to occur in children and in adults with weak immune systems. You can get E. coli infections by eating foods containing the bacteria. To help avoid food poisoning and prevent infection, handle food safely. Cook meat well, wash fruits and vegetables before eating or cooking them, and avoid unpasteurized milk and juices. You can also get the infection by swallowing water in a swimming pool contaminated with human waste. Most cases of E. coli infection get better without treatment in 5 to 10 days.
Research report on biopharmaceutical and vaccine manufacturing markets

Research report on biopharmaceutical and vaccine manufacturing markets

The total biopharmaceutical manufacturing market is growing, according to Kalorama Information's report, Biopharmaceutical and Vaccine Production Markets. [More]
New approach to diagnose tuberculosis

New approach to diagnose tuberculosis

Researchers working in the UK and The Gambia, have developed a new approach to the diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB) that relies on direct sequencing of DNA extracted from sputum (a technique called metagenomics) to detect and characterize the bacteria that cause TB without the need for time-consuming culture of bacteria in the laboratory. [More]
MIT engineers find new strategy to combat superbugs

MIT engineers find new strategy to combat superbugs

In recent years, new strains of bacteria have emerged that resist even the most powerful antibiotics. Each year, these superbugs, including drug-resistant forms of tuberculosis and staphylococcus, infect more than 2 million people nationwide, and kill at least 23,000. Despite the urgent need for new treatments, scientists have discovered very few new classes of antibiotics in the past decade. [More]
Novel technique uses genetic tool and light to map neural networks

Novel technique uses genetic tool and light to map neural networks

For years, neuroscientists have been trying to develop tools that would allow them to clearly view the brain's circuitry in action-from the first moment a neuron fires to the resulting behavior in a whole organism. [More]
Blocking bacteria's access to iron: an interview with Dr. Laxminarayana Devireddy

Blocking bacteria's access to iron: an interview with Dr. Laxminarayana Devireddy

Iron is a key nutrient for nearly all living organisms, including bacteria. Iron is a cofactor for many enzymes necessary for basic metabolic reactions such as DNA synthesis and electron transport. Iron serves as the conduit for the electron transport chain that generates the energy necessary to drive the bacterial cell. [More]
Evolutionary analysis of public health data during major disease outbreak

Evolutionary analysis of public health data during major disease outbreak

An evolutionary analysis of public health data during a major disease outbreak, such as bird flu, E. coli contamination of food or the current Ebola outbreak could help the emergency services plan their response and contain the disease more effectively. [More]
Gene therapy may offer significant advantages in prevention of botulism exposure

Gene therapy may offer significant advantages in prevention of botulism exposure

The current method to treat acute toxin poisoning is to inject antibodies, commonly produced in animals, to neutralize the toxin. But this method has challenges ranging from safety to difficulties in developing, producing and maintaining the anti-serums in large quantities. [More]
Experimental drug shows promise as viable treatment for anemia of inflammation

Experimental drug shows promise as viable treatment for anemia of inflammation

An experimental drug designed to help regulate the blood's iron supply shows promise as a viable first treatment for anemia of inflammation, according to results from the first human study of the treatment published online today in Blood, the Journal of the American Society of Hematology. [More]
Queen's University scientists make breakthrough in fight against hospital superbugs

Queen's University scientists make breakthrough in fight against hospital superbugs

Scientists at Queen's University Belfast have made a breakthrough in the fight against the most resistant hospital superbugs. [More]
New method of growing human cells may help develop tailor-made therapies for GI conditions

New method of growing human cells may help develop tailor-made therapies for GI conditions

A method of growing human cells from tissue removed from a patient's gastrointestinal (GI) tract eventually may help scientists develop tailor-made therapies for inflammatory bowel disease and other GI conditions. [More]
Researchers examine effects of bacteria in fighting against obesity

Researchers examine effects of bacteria in fighting against obesity

A probiotic that prevents obesity could be on the horizon. Bacteria that produce a therapeutic compound in the gut inhibit weight gain, insulin resistance and other adverse effects of a high-fat diet in mice, Vanderbilt University investigators have discovered. [More]

Researchers seek ways to prevent foodborne illnesses with cinnamon

Seeking ways to prevent some of the most serious foodborne illnesses caused by pathogenic bacteria, two Washington State University scientists have found promise in an ancient but common cooking spice: cinnamon. [More]
Bubble wrap offers numerous advantages for people living in resource-limited areas

Bubble wrap offers numerous advantages for people living in resource-limited areas

Popping the blisters on the bubble wrap might be the most enjoyable thing about moving. But now, scientists propose a more productive way to reuse the popular packing material - as a sheet of small, test tube-like containers for medical and environmental samples. [More]
Novagant releases GoldenCBD oil including capsules and liquids

Novagant releases GoldenCBD oil including capsules and liquids

Novagant Corp. is pleased to announce that in this month of July it will release its GoldenCBD™ oil that will be available in several forms, including capsules and liquids. It will be the answer for those Medical Cannabis Patients living outside Washington and Colorado. [More]
Biochemists find groups of tiny protein loops that help bacteria to establish infection

Biochemists find groups of tiny protein loops that help bacteria to establish infection

When it comes to infecting humans and animals, bacteria need a helping hand. Kansas State University biochemists have found the helping hand: groups of tiny protein loops on the surface of cells. [More]
Scientists develop new weapon against bacterial infections in the form of tiny DNA pyramids

Scientists develop new weapon against bacterial infections in the form of tiny DNA pyramids

Bacterial infections usually announce themselves with pain and fever but often can be defeated with antibiotics - and then there are those that are sneaky and hard to beat. Now, scientists have built a new weapon against such pathogens in the form of tiny DNA pyramids. [More]
Sigma-Tau Rare Disease seeks EMA approval for use of Oncaspar for ALL treatment

Sigma-Tau Rare Disease seeks EMA approval for use of Oncaspar for ALL treatment

Sigma Tau Pharma Ltd. (hereinafter referred to as Sigma-Tau Rare Disease), today announced the submission of an application to the European Medicines Agency for use of its pegylatedL-asparaginase, Oncaspar (pegaspargase) for the treatment of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia (ALL) as part of a multi-agent chemotherapeutic regimen. [More]
New pathway to disabling disease: blocking bacteria's access to iron in the body

New pathway to disabling disease: blocking bacteria's access to iron in the body

In an era of increasing concern about the prevalence of antibiotic-resistant illness, Case Western Reserve researchers have identified a promising new pathway to disabling disease: blocking bacteria's access to iron in the body. [More]
Researcher describes possible implications of increased gravity effect on immunity

Researcher describes possible implications of increased gravity effect on immunity

Before you swat away the next fruit fly, consider instead just how similar its biological complexities are to our own. [More]
Alexion announces that FDA grants ODD to Soliris for Myasthenia Gravis treatment

Alexion announces that FDA grants ODD to Soliris for Myasthenia Gravis treatment

Alexion Pharmaceuticals (Nasdaq:ALXN) today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has granted orphan drug designation (ODD) to Soliris® (eculizumab) for the treatment of patients with Myasthenia Gravis (MG), a rare, debilitating neurologic disorder caused by uncontrolled complement activation. [More]