E. coli News and Research RSS Feed - E. coli News and Research

E. coli or Escherichia coli is the name of a type of bacteria that lives in your intestines. Most types of E. coli are harmless. However, some types can make you sick and cause diarrhea. One type causes travelers' diarrhea. The worst type of E. coli causes bloody diarrhea, and can sometimes cause kidney failure and even death. These problems are most likely to occur in children and in adults with weak immune systems. You can get E. coli infections by eating foods containing the bacteria. To help avoid food poisoning and prevent infection, handle food safely. Cook meat well, wash fruits and vegetables before eating or cooking them, and avoid unpasteurized milk and juices. You can also get the infection by swallowing water in a swimming pool contaminated with human waste. Most cases of E. coli infection get better without treatment in 5 to 10 days.
Research: Common bacteria poised to become antibiotic-resistant superbugs

Research: Common bacteria poised to become antibiotic-resistant superbugs

Antibiotic resistance is poised to spread globally among bacteria frequently implicated in respiratory and urinary infections in hospital settings, according to new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. [More]
Researchers team up to study stomach flu

Researchers team up to study stomach flu

Rice University bioengineers are teaming with colleagues from Baylor College of Medicine and MD Anderson Cancer Center to apply the latest techniques in tissue engineering toward the study of one of the most common and deadly human illnesses -- the stomach flu. [More]
New method could help understand functions of gut microbiome

New method could help understand functions of gut microbiome

Researchers at Harvard Medical School and Columbia University in the United States have developed a way to study the functions of hard-to-grow bacteria that contribute to the composition of the gut microbiome. The new method is published in the journal Molecular Systems Biology. [More]
Phico Therapeutics gets £2.25M Translation Award to develop SASPject PT4 antibiotic for E. coli, K. pneumoniae

Phico Therapeutics gets £2.25M Translation Award to develop SASPject PT4 antibiotic for E. coli, K. pneumoniae

Phico Therapeutics, a biotechnology company developing a novel platform technology for a new generation of antibiotics aimed at overcoming antibacterial resistance, has been awarded a £2.25M Translation Award by the Wellcome Trust to develop its SASPject PT4 antibiotic, aimed at Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae. [More]
World first: Antimicrobial copper supermarket trolleys

World first: Antimicrobial copper supermarket trolleys

In a world first, a Brazilian supermarket has introduced supermarket trolleys with antimicrobial copper handles to help reduce the spread of disease-causing pathogens. [More]
Researchers develop durable antibacterial coatings of nanocomposites

Researchers develop durable antibacterial coatings of nanocomposites

Ruthless with bacteria, harmless to human cells. New, durable antibacterial coatings of nanocomposites, developed at the Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Polish Academy of Sciences in Warsaw, will in future help to improve the hygiene of sportswear, and used in medicine, will reduce the rate of infections and shorten the times of in-patient hospital admissions. [More]

Great Basin Scientific begins clinical trial for Shiga toxin-producing E. coli diagnostic test

Great Basin Scientific, Inc., today announced it has initiated a clinical trial for its Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) diagnostic test. [More]
Standard cleaning procedures in retail delis may not eradicate Listeria pathogen, study shows

Standard cleaning procedures in retail delis may not eradicate Listeria pathogen, study shows

Purdue University research shows that standard cleaning procedures in retail delis may not eradicate Listeria monocytogenes bacteria, which can cause a potentially fatal disease in people with vulnerable immune systems. [More]
IU researchers awarded NIH grant to develop new weapon to fight against antibiotic-resistant bacteria

IU researchers awarded NIH grant to develop new weapon to fight against antibiotic-resistant bacteria

The alarming increase of antibiotic-resistant bacteria poses health and economic threats worldwide, with more than 2 million Americans infected by the bacteria each year. Now, a team of Indiana University chemists and biologists has been awarded a major grant to develop and use a chemical tagging method to better understand how bacteria build their cell wall, which is still the best target for new antibiotics. [More]
Findings could lead to new therapeutic approach to Parkinson's disease

Findings could lead to new therapeutic approach to Parkinson's disease

E.. coli usually brings to mind food poisoning and beach closures, but researchers recently discovered a protein in E.. coli that inhibits the accumulation of potentially toxic amyloids--a hallmark of diseases such as Parkinson's. [More]
Antibiotic resistance remains a serious health problem in Australia, warns NPS MedicineWise

Antibiotic resistance remains a serious health problem in Australia, warns NPS MedicineWise

In light of a major breakthrough in the quest to find new antibiotics with the discovery of teixobactin, NPS MedicineWise warns that antibiotic resistance in Australia remains a serious health problem we all need to work to address. [More]
FDA approves intravenous administration of Erwinaze (asparaginase Erwinia chrysanthemi)

FDA approves intravenous administration of Erwinaze (asparaginase Erwinia chrysanthemi)

Jazz Pharmaceuticals plc today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the intravenous administration of Erwinaze (asparaginase Erwinia chrysanthemi). Erwinaze is indicated as a component of a multi-agent chemotherapeutic regimen for the treatment of patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) who have developed hypersensitivity to E. coli-derived asparaginase. [More]
Researchers reveal common features responsible for antibiotic resistance

Researchers reveal common features responsible for antibiotic resistance

Treating bacterial infections with antibiotics is becoming increasingly difficult as bacteria develop resistance not only to the antibiotics being used against them, but also to ones they have never encountered before. By analyzing genetic and phenotypic changes in antibiotic-resistant strains of E. coli, researchers at the RIKEN Quantitative Biology Center in Japan have revealed a common set of features that appear to be responsible for the development of resistance to several types of antibiotics. [More]
Study offers insights into mechanisms of bacterial resistance to antimicrobial peptides

Study offers insights into mechanisms of bacterial resistance to antimicrobial peptides

Antimicrobial peptides are a distinctive class of potent, broad-spectrum antibiotics produced by the body's innate immune system--the first line of defense against disease-causing microbes. [More]
Danish researchers working on new type of vaccine that targets disease causing bacterium

Danish researchers working on new type of vaccine that targets disease causing bacterium

When we acquire diarrhea on a vacation, it is often caused by a bacterial infection. Now a Danish research team is working on a new type of vaccine design targeting the disease causing bacterium - if it works it may very well revolutionize not only the prevention of this disease, but also offer protection against other pathogens with a heavy disease burden such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis and antibiotic-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). [More]
UT Southwestern microbiologists identify key gut bacteria that promotes foodborne infections

UT Southwestern microbiologists identify key gut bacteria that promotes foodborne infections

UT Southwestern Medical Center microbiologists have identified key bacteria in the gut whose resources are hijacked to spread harmful foodborne E. coli infections and other intestinal illnesses. [More]
Simple rectal swab cultures can thwart drug-resistant E. coli in patients undergoing TRUSBx procedures

Simple rectal swab cultures can thwart drug-resistant E. coli in patients undergoing TRUSBx procedures

Some infections after prostate biopsy due to drug-resistant Escherichia coli can be thwarted by simple rectal swab cultures prior to the procedure. The cultures test for antibiotic-resistant E. coli, and the findings are used to direct the selection of antimicrobial prophylaxis used for the procedure, according to Rhode Island Hospital researchers. [More]
Research findings may lead to new ways to thwart drug resistance

Research findings may lead to new ways to thwart drug resistance

Penicillin, the wonder drug discovered in 1928, works in ways that are still mysterious almost a century later. One of the oldest and most widely used antibiotics, it attacks enzymes that build the bacterial cell wall, a mesh that surrounds the bacterial membrane and gives the cells their integrity and shape. Once that wall is breached, bacteria die -- allowing us to recover from infection. [More]
FDA Advisory Committee votes in favor of Actavis' ceftazidime-avibactam

FDA Advisory Committee votes in favor of Actavis' ceftazidime-avibactam

Actavis plc today announced that the Anti-Infective Drugs Advisory Committee convened by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has voted to recommend approval of Actavis' New Drug Application (NDA) for ceftazidime-avibactam, an investigational antibiotic being developed to treat hospitalized patients when limited or no treatment options are available for complicated intra-abdominal infections (cIAI) (in combination with metronidazole) and complicated urinary tract infections (cUTI) (including acute pyelonephritis) caused by Gram-negative pathogens. [More]
Researchers create synthetic surface to control adhesion of E. coli bacteria

Researchers create synthetic surface to control adhesion of E. coli bacteria

A research team from Kiel University and Goethe University Frankfurt has jointly created a synthetic surface on which the adhesion of E. coli bacteria can be controlled. The layer, which is only approximately four nanometres thick, imitates the saccharide coating (glycocalyx) of cells onto which the bacteria adhere such as during an infection. This docking process can be switched on and off using light. [More]
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