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E. coli or Escherichia coli is the name of a type of bacteria that lives in your intestines. Most types of E. coli are harmless. However, some types can make you sick and cause diarrhea. One type causes travelers' diarrhea. The worst type of E. coli causes bloody diarrhea, and can sometimes cause kidney failure and even death. These problems are most likely to occur in children and in adults with weak immune systems. You can get E. coli infections by eating foods containing the bacteria. To help avoid food poisoning and prevent infection, handle food safely. Cook meat well, wash fruits and vegetables before eating or cooking them, and avoid unpasteurized milk and juices. You can also get the infection by swallowing water in a swimming pool contaminated with human waste. Most cases of E. coli infection get better without treatment in 5 to 10 days.
Researchers discover how signals from infectious bacteria get to inflammasome sensors

Researchers discover how signals from infectious bacteria get to inflammasome sensors

Researchers at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital have discovered the way signals from infectious bacteria gain entry into the cytoplasm of host cells to activate disease-fighting inflammasomes. [More]
Study offers unprecedented quantification of pathogens that cause childhood diarrhea

Study offers unprecedented quantification of pathogens that cause childhood diarrhea

New research offers unprecedented insights into the causes of childhood diarrhea, the second-leading cause of death of children worldwide, and suggests that the role of pathogens such as bacteria, viruses and parasites has been vastly underestimated. [More]
Scientists identify potential new way to prevent chronic urinary tract infections

Scientists identify potential new way to prevent chronic urinary tract infections

Researchers have identified a potential way to prevent chronic urinary tract infections (UTIs). Their research points to a key protein that bacteria use to latch onto the bladder and cause UTIs, according to scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. [More]
Novel nanosensor could rapidly detect pathogens that cause foodborne illnesses

Novel nanosensor could rapidly detect pathogens that cause foodborne illnesses

It seems like almost every week another food product is being recalled because of contamination. [More]
Groundbreaking research findings could lead to potential new treatments for Crohn’s disease

Groundbreaking research findings could lead to potential new treatments for Crohn’s disease

A Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine-led team of international researchers has for the first time identified a fungus as a key factor in the development of Crohn's disease. [More]
New study shows how increase in medication-resistant bacteria impedes treatment of kidney infections

New study shows how increase in medication-resistant bacteria impedes treatment of kidney infections

The increase in illnesses and deaths linked to medication-resistant bacteria has been well-documented by researchers and received extensive public attention in recent years. Now, UCLA-led research shows how these bacteria are making it more difficult to treat a common but severe kidney infection. [More]
Researchers identify and treat new variant of antibiotic-resistant E. coli

Researchers identify and treat new variant of antibiotic-resistant E. coli

Researchers at Massachusetts Eye and Ear have discovered a new mutation in a highly antibiotic-resistant strain of E. coli that resists clearance by the body's own immune system by inhibiting white blood cells that ordinarily kill and remove bacteria. [More]
New sensor can quickly and cost-effectively detect deadly E.coli bacteria

New sensor can quickly and cost-effectively detect deadly E.coli bacteria

Scientists have built a new sensor that can detect the potentially deadly E.coli bacteria in 15-20 minutes, much faster than traditional lab tests. E.coli can be transmitted in contaminated food and water, posing particular risks to children and the elderly. [More]
Novel technique offers new insights into growth variation across single cells

Novel technique offers new insights into growth variation across single cells

A new technique invented at MIT can precisely measure the growth of many individual cells simultaneously. [More]
New discovery could lead to effective treatment methods for cystitis

New discovery could lead to effective treatment methods for cystitis

Every year, millions of people are treated for cystitis, but despite its prevalence, the disease is still a scientific mystery. [More]
European scientists invent new microscope for rapid detection of deadly infections

European scientists invent new microscope for rapid detection of deadly infections

A group of European scientists have invented a microscope that will allow the fastest ever detection of life-threatening infections caused by bacteria, such as E. coli or Staphylococcus, and conditions such as Meningitis, saving millions of lives every year. [More]
Portable Lab-on-a-Stick test helps in rapid detection of bacterial resistance to antibiotics

Portable Lab-on-a-Stick test helps in rapid detection of bacterial resistance to antibiotics

A portable power-free test for the rapid detection of bacterial resistance to antibiotics has been developed by academics at Loughborough University and the University of Reading. [More]
Disordered airway microbiome at birth may be linked to severe neonatal lung disease

Disordered airway microbiome at birth may be linked to severe neonatal lung disease

In contrast to the general belief that the airways of an infant are sterile until after birth, University of Alabama at Birmingham researchers and colleagues have found that the infant airway is already colonized with bacteria or bacterial DNA when a baby is born -- and this is true for infants born as early as 24 weeks gestation. [More]
E. coli K1 inhibits glucose transporters during meningitis, report scientists

E. coli K1 inhibits glucose transporters during meningitis, report scientists

Escherichia coli K1 (E. coli K1) continues to be a major threat to the health of young infants. Affecting the central nervous system, it causes neonatal meningitis by multiplying in immune cells, such as macrophages, and then disseminating into the bloodstream to subsequently invade the blood-brain barrier. [More]
E. coli bacteria capable of beneficial mutations at more variable rates than previously thought

E. coli bacteria capable of beneficial mutations at more variable rates than previously thought

Scientists studying how microbes evolve have long assumed that nearly all new genetic mutations get passed down at a predictable pace and usually without either helping or hurting the microbe in adapting to its environment. [More]
Human immune system proteins can help combat chlamydia infections

Human immune system proteins can help combat chlamydia infections

Scientists from Federal Research and Clinical Centre of Physical-Chemical Medicine, Koltzov Institute of Developmental Biology and MIPT have shown that peptidoglycan recognition proteins (PGLYRPs) of the human immune system can play a key role in the fight against chlamydia infections. Their study was published in Infection and Immunity. [More]
Combinations of three antibiotics could help combat drug-resistant bacterial infections

Combinations of three antibiotics could help combat drug-resistant bacterial infections

Each year, approximately 700,000 people die from drug-resistant bacterial infections. A study by UCLA life scientists could be a major step toward combating drug-resistant infections. [More]
Tourists returning from India import multidrug-resistant superbugs

Tourists returning from India import multidrug-resistant superbugs

Many tourists returning from India were found colonized with multidrug-resistant superbugs. Microbiologists at the Institute for Infectious Diseases of the University of Bern, Switzerland, also isolated a strain possessing a gene which can make these life-threatening bacteria resistant to the last active antibiotic option. [More]
Italian researchers identify new variant of emerging antibiotic resistance mechanism

Italian researchers identify new variant of emerging antibiotic resistance mechanism

A team of Italian investigators has discovered a new variant of an emerging antibiotic resistance mechanism. The new variant, dubbed mcr-1.2, confers resistance to colistin, a last-resort antibiotic against multidrug-resistant Gram-negative pathogens. [More]
UTSA researcher elucidates innovative strategies to track disease-causing pathogens

UTSA researcher elucidates innovative strategies to track disease-causing pathogens

In a new study published in Frontiers in Microbiology, Mark Eppinger, assistant professor in the Department of Biology at The University of Texas at San Antonio describes innovative strategies to track disease-causing pathogens like E. coli. Eppinger hopes his research will aid in halting and preventing large-scale outbreaks. [More]
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