E. coli News and Research RSS Feed - E. coli News and Research

E. coli or Escherichia coli is the name of a type of bacteria that lives in your intestines. Most types of E. coli are harmless. However, some types can make you sick and cause diarrhea. One type causes travelers' diarrhea. The worst type of E. coli causes bloody diarrhea, and can sometimes cause kidney failure and even death. These problems are most likely to occur in children and in adults with weak immune systems. You can get E. coli infections by eating foods containing the bacteria. To help avoid food poisoning and prevent infection, handle food safely. Cook meat well, wash fruits and vegetables before eating or cooking them, and avoid unpasteurized milk and juices. You can also get the infection by swallowing water in a swimming pool contaminated with human waste. Most cases of E. coli infection get better without treatment in 5 to 10 days.
First clinical trial to study use of Chinese Herbal Medicines in treating RUTIs

First clinical trial to study use of Chinese Herbal Medicines in treating RUTIs

Researchers at the University of Southampton are to study the use of Chinese Herbal Medicines in treating recurrent urinary tract infections (RUTIs), in the first clinical trial of its kind in the UK. [More]
Researchers genetically modify microalgae to form complex molecules

Researchers genetically modify microalgae to form complex molecules

Researchers from Copenhagen Plant Science Centre at University of Copenhagen have succeeded in manipulating a strain of microalgae to form complex molecules to an unprecedented extent. [More]
Hydrogel-based rapid detection system may help early detection of E. coli in drinking water

Hydrogel-based rapid detection system may help early detection of E. coli in drinking water

Tragedies like the E. coli outbreak in Ontario's Walkerton in May 2000 could be averted today with a new invention by researchers at York University that can detect the deadly contaminant in drinking water early. [More]
Scientists uncover whole new way of treating antibiotic-resistant superbugs

Scientists uncover whole new way of treating antibiotic-resistant superbugs

Australian scientists may have found a way to stop deadly bacteria from infecting patients. The discovery could lead to a whole new way of treating antibiotic-resistant "superbugs". The researchers have uncovered what may be an Achilles heel on the bacteria cell membrane that could act as a potential novel drug target. [More]

Oxford Nanoimaging begins sales of desktop optical microscope

Oxford Nanoimaging commence sales of an elegant desktop optical microscope capable of zooming in on objects as tiny as structures inside living cells. This super-resolution microscope will allow scientists to watch how individual molecules perform chemical reactions in real-time. [More]
Scientists identify new hots pots of antibiotic resistance

Scientists identify new hots pots of antibiotic resistance

Antibiotic-resistant bacteria most often are associated with hospitals and other health-care settings, but a new study indicates that chicken coops and sewage treatment plants also are hot spots of antibiotic resistance. [More]
MGH researchers develop device to rapidly diagnose health-care-associated infections

MGH researchers develop device to rapidly diagnose health-care-associated infections

A team of Massachusetts General Hospital investigators has developed a device with the potential of shortening the time required to rapidly diagnose pathogens responsible for health-care-associated infections from a couple of days to a matter of hours. [More]
Research shows spleen MZ B cells produce signaling proteins involved in inflammatory responses

Research shows spleen MZ B cells produce signaling proteins involved in inflammatory responses

The inability to adequately respond to infection can cause a whole-body state of inflammation known as sepsis. This can eventually lead to systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), and even death. [More]
Study shows syringe-like device acts as traffic cop directing bacteria to carry out infection

Study shows syringe-like device acts as traffic cop directing bacteria to carry out infection

A study has found that a syringe-like device used to invade intestinal cells also acts as a traffic cop -- directing bacteria where to go and thereby enabling them to efficiently carry out infection. [More]
Early exposure to pathogens may play pivotal role in immune system development

Early exposure to pathogens may play pivotal role in immune system development

Exposure to pathogens early in life is beneficial to the education and development of the human immune system. [More]
Probiotic supplements may help treat post-menopausal osteoporosis

Probiotic supplements may help treat post-menopausal osteoporosis

Probiotic supplements protected female mice from the loss of bone density that occurs after having their ovaries removed, researchers at Emory University School of Medicine and Georgia State University have shown. [More]
Researchers determine 3-D structure of RlmN protein from bacteria

Researchers determine 3-D structure of RlmN protein from bacteria

The structure of a bacterial RNA-binding protein has been determined in the act of modifying a molecule of RNA -- an achievement that provides researchers with a unique view of the protein's function in action and could lead to clues that would help in the fight against the development of antibiotic-resistant infections. [More]
Small piece of detoxified E. coli wall makes mice lose natural sweet tooth, study finds

Small piece of detoxified E. coli wall makes mice lose natural sweet tooth, study finds

Putting just a tiny piece of the wall of detoxified E. coli into their gut make mice lose their natural sweet tooth, researchers report. [More]
New study demonstrates diversity, resourcefulness of Vibrio cholera

New study demonstrates diversity, resourcefulness of Vibrio cholera

In humans, cholera is among the world's most deadly diseases, killing as many as 140,000 persons a year, according to World Health Organization statistics. But in aquatic environments far away from humans, the same bacterium attacks neighboring microbes with a toxic spear - and often steals DNA from other microorganisms to expand its own capabilities. [More]
Bacteria uses sensitive, nano-sized pump to transport magnesium

Bacteria uses sensitive, nano-sized pump to transport magnesium

Researchers at UiO and NCMM have discovered that the system used by bacteria to transport magnesium is so sensitive that it can detect a pinch of magnesium salt in a swimming pool. [More]
Simple, paper-based test could help detect foodborne pathogens

Simple, paper-based test could help detect foodborne pathogens

Food poisoning is a stomach-churning, miserable condition that sends thousands of Americans to hospital emergency rooms every year. Now scientists report in ACS' journal Analytical Chemistry a simple, paper-based test that could help detect pathogens hitchhiking on food before they reach store shelves, restaurants and, most importantly, our stomachs. [More]
Researchers reveal link between necrotizing enterocolitis and uropathogenic E. coli

Researchers reveal link between necrotizing enterocolitis and uropathogenic E. coli

Necrotizing enterocolitis is an intestinal disease that afflicts about one in 10 extremely premature infants and is fatal in nearly one-third of cases. The premature infant gut is believed to react to colonizing bacteria, causing damage to the intestinal walls and severe infection. [More]
UCMR researchers discover compounds that can attenuate virulence of Listeria monocytogenes

UCMR researchers discover compounds that can attenuate virulence of Listeria monocytogenes

Scientists at Umea Centre for Microbial Research have discovered chemical compounds which are able to attenuate the virulence of the bacterial human pathogen Listeria monocytogenes. Their findings are published today in the high impact journal Cell Chemical Biology. [More]
Startling lack of resistance genes discovered in intensively-farmed beef

Startling lack of resistance genes discovered in intensively-farmed beef

In the first study to track antibiotic resistance in intensively-farmed beef, scientists discovered a "startling" lack of resistance genes in meat.Meanwhile, in soil and faeces samples from cattle pens they found genes resistant to a powerful "last resort" class of antibiotics called carpabemens that aren't used in the livestock industry. These genes may have jumped from humans or companion animals to livestock, or could even be present at low levels in the wider environment. [More]
Gut microbial imbalance appears to be underlying cause of fatal intestinal illness in premature babies

Gut microbial imbalance appears to be underlying cause of fatal intestinal illness in premature babies

An imbalance of certain gut microbes appears to be the underlying cause of a frequently fatal intestinal illness in premature babies, according to new research led by Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement