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E. coli or Escherichia coli is the name of a type of bacteria that lives in your intestines. Most types of E. coli are harmless. However, some types can make you sick and cause diarrhea. One type causes travelers' diarrhea. The worst type of E. coli causes bloody diarrhea, and can sometimes cause kidney failure and even death. These problems are most likely to occur in children and in adults with weak immune systems. You can get E. coli infections by eating foods containing the bacteria. To help avoid food poisoning and prevent infection, handle food safely. Cook meat well, wash fruits and vegetables before eating or cooking them, and avoid unpasteurized milk and juices. You can also get the infection by swallowing water in a swimming pool contaminated with human waste. Most cases of E. coli infection get better without treatment in 5 to 10 days.
Research: Mechanisms behind bacterial warfare could be harnessed to target pathogenic bacteria

Research: Mechanisms behind bacterial warfare could be harnessed to target pathogenic bacteria

Two UC Santa Barbara graduate students have demonstrated how certain microbes exploit proteins in nearby bacteria to deliver toxins and kill them. [More]
Flu remedies can help treat E. coli bacteria

Flu remedies can help treat E. coli bacteria

If the intestinal bacteria level becomes unbalanced, it can cause diseases. Physiologists from the University of Zurich reveal how a specific carbohydrate in the intestinal mucosa heavily multiplies certain E. coli bacteria and thus causes inflammations. These could be treated with flu remedies, which opens up new therapeutic possibilities. [More]
Wyss Institute scientists develop improved blood-cleansing therapeutic device to treat sepsis

Wyss Institute scientists develop improved blood-cleansing therapeutic device to treat sepsis

Last year, a Wyss Institute team of scientists described the development of a new device to treat sepsis that works by mimicking our spleen. It cleanses pathogens and toxins from blood circulating through a dialysis-like circuit. Now, the Wyss Institute team has developed an improved device that synergizes with conventional antibiotic therapies and that has been streamlined to better position it for near-term translation to the clinic. [More]
Researchers describe new Lab-on-a-Disc device for fast and reliable diagnostics of urinary tract infections

Researchers describe new Lab-on-a-Disc device for fast and reliable diagnostics of urinary tract infections

Urinary tract infections can quickly move from being a merely miserable experience to a life-threatening condition. Untreated cases may trigger sepsis, which occurs when the immune system, in an attempt to fight off the infection, inadvertently activates body-wide inflammation that can cause blood clots and leaky blood vessels. [More]
New biosensors detect efficient microbial workers that produce chemical, pharmaceutical commodities

New biosensors detect efficient microbial workers that produce chemical, pharmaceutical commodities

Super productive factories of the future could employ fleets of genetically engineered bacterial cells, such as common E. coli, to produce valuable chemical commodities in an environmentally friendly way. [More]
UBC scientists reveal new weapon to combat malnutrition

UBC scientists reveal new weapon to combat malnutrition

UBC scientists have opened the doors to new research into malnutrition by creating an animal model that replicates the imbalance of gut bacteria associated with the difficult-to-treat disease. [More]
Discovery could put individuals with relapsing UTIs on fast track for new therapeutic regimen

Discovery could put individuals with relapsing UTIs on fast track for new therapeutic regimen

It's one thing to grow bacteria in a test tube, perform a screen in the lab, and find a mutation in the pathogen's genes. It's a whole other thing, and much rarer, to find the exact same mutation in nature--in this case, in E. coli in urine samples from some 500 patients suffering from relapsing urinary tract infections. [More]
DigiPath Labs, Romer Labs to validate kit-based assays for food-borne pathogen, mycotoxin testing for cannabis

DigiPath Labs, Romer Labs to validate kit-based assays for food-borne pathogen, mycotoxin testing for cannabis

DigiPath Labs, the cannabis testing subsidiary of DigiPath, Inc., is combining efforts with True North Laboratory of Ann Arbor, Michigan, and Romer Labs, a leading global supplier of diagnostic solutions for food-borne pathogens, to investigate the applicability of utilizing Romer Labs' rapid diagnostic test kits to screen for food-borne pathogens and quantify mycotoxins present in cannabis. [More]
Study points to potential treatment for thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura

Study points to potential treatment for thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura

A rare autoimmune disease creates sudden pain in the abdomen or the head, sending a patient to the emergency room with a potentially fatal condition. The pain comes from a multitude of blockages of tiny blood vessels, formed after the patient's own immune system somehow inhibits an enzyme that is vital to control clotting. [More]
Duke study finds that gut worms can protect babies' brains from chronic inflammation

Duke study finds that gut worms can protect babies' brains from chronic inflammation

A Duke University study in rats finds that gut worms can protect babies' brains from long-term learning and memory problems caused by newborn infections. [More]
Virginia Tech scientist uses mathematical model to show how bacteria can control behavior of robots

Virginia Tech scientist uses mathematical model to show how bacteria can control behavior of robots

Forget the Vulcan mind-meld of the Star Trek generation -- as far as mind control techniques go, bacteria is the next frontier. In a paper published July 16 in Scientific Reports, which is part of the Nature Publishing Group, a Virginia Tech scientist used a mathematical model to demonstrate that bacteria can control the behavior of an inanimate device like a robot. [More]
New hand-held paper machine could be used for point-of-care detection of infectious diseases, cancer

New hand-held paper machine could be used for point-of-care detection of infectious diseases, cancer

In the U.S. and other industrialized nations, testing for infectious diseases and cancer often requires expensive equipment and highly trained specialists. In countries where resources are limited, performing the same diagnostics is far more challenging. To address this disparity, scientists are developing a portable, low-cost "paper machine" for point-of-care detection of infectious diseases, genetic conditions and cancer. [More]
Severe burns dramatically change bacteria populations, study finds

Severe burns dramatically change bacteria populations, study finds

A study published in PLOS ONE has found that burn patients experience dramatic changes in the 100 trillion bacteria inside the gastrointestinal tract. [More]
Bacterial biofilms play role in development of systemic lupus erythematosus

Bacterial biofilms play role in development of systemic lupus erythematosus

Lupus, multiple sclerosis, and type-1 diabetes are among more than a score of diseases in which the immune system attacks the body it was designed to defend. But just why the immune system begins its misdirected assault has remained a mystery. [More]
Diet, acidity of urine may influence susceptibility to urinary tract infections

Diet, acidity of urine may influence susceptibility to urinary tract infections

The acidity of urine -- as well as the presence of small molecules related to diet -- may influence how well bacteria can grow in the urinary tract, a new study shows. The research, at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, may have implications for treating urinary tract infections, which are among the most common bacterial infections worldwide. [More]
PNP Therapeutics granted FDA orphan drug designation for Gedeptin

PNP Therapeutics granted FDA orphan drug designation for Gedeptin

PNP Therapeutics Inc. announced today the Food and Drug Administration has granted orphan drug status to Gedeptin, the Company's lead product candidate (adenoviral vector expressing E. coli purine nucleoside phosphorylase gene) for the intratumoral treatment of anatomically accessible oral and pharyngeal cancers, including cancers of the lip, tongue, gum, floor of mouth, salivary gland and other oral cavities. [More]
Genetically-programmed probiotics could help detect liver cancer metastases early-on

Genetically-programmed probiotics could help detect liver cancer metastases early-on

Scientists at the University of California, San Diego and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have described a new method for detecting liver cancer metastases in mice. The approach uses over-the-counter probiotics genetically programmed to produce signals easily detectable in urine when liver cancer metastases are present. [More]
UB researchers successfully harness E. coli to generate new forms of antibiotics

UB researchers successfully harness E. coli to generate new forms of antibiotics

Like a dairy farmer tending to a herd of cows to produce milk, researchers are tending to colonies of the bacteria Escherichia coli (E. coli) to produce new forms of antibiotics -- including three that show promise in fighting drug-resistant bacteria. [More]
MIT, UCSD researchers use probiotics to detect cancer in the liver

MIT, UCSD researchers use probiotics to detect cancer in the liver

Engineers at MIT and the University of California at San Diego have devised a new way to detect cancer that has spread to the liver, by enlisting help from probiotics — beneficial bacteria similar to those found in yogurt. [More]
Duke researchers reveal how bladder cells can eject UTI-causing bacteria

Duke researchers reveal how bladder cells can eject UTI-causing bacteria

Duke Medicine researchers have found that bladder cells have a highly effective way to combat E. coli bacteria that cause urinary tract infections (UTIs). [More]
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