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E. coli or Escherichia coli is the name of a type of bacteria that lives in your intestines. Most types of E. coli are harmless. However, some types can make you sick and cause diarrhea. One type causes travelers' diarrhea. The worst type of E. coli causes bloody diarrhea, and can sometimes cause kidney failure and even death. These problems are most likely to occur in children and in adults with weak immune systems. You can get E. coli infections by eating foods containing the bacteria. To help avoid food poisoning and prevent infection, handle food safely. Cook meat well, wash fruits and vegetables before eating or cooking them, and avoid unpasteurized milk and juices. You can also get the infection by swallowing water in a swimming pool contaminated with human waste. Most cases of E. coli infection get better without treatment in 5 to 10 days.
Diet, acidity of urine may influence susceptibility to urinary tract infections

Diet, acidity of urine may influence susceptibility to urinary tract infections

The acidity of urine -- as well as the presence of small molecules related to diet -- may influence how well bacteria can grow in the urinary tract, a new study shows. The research, at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, may have implications for treating urinary tract infections, which are among the most common bacterial infections worldwide. [More]
PNP Therapeutics granted FDA orphan drug designation for Gedeptin

PNP Therapeutics granted FDA orphan drug designation for Gedeptin

PNP Therapeutics Inc. announced today the Food and Drug Administration has granted orphan drug status to Gedeptin, the Company's lead product candidate (adenoviral vector expressing E. coli purine nucleoside phosphorylase gene) for the intratumoral treatment of anatomically accessible oral and pharyngeal cancers, including cancers of the lip, tongue, gum, floor of mouth, salivary gland and other oral cavities. [More]
Genetically-programmed probiotics could help detect liver cancer metastases early-on

Genetically-programmed probiotics could help detect liver cancer metastases early-on

Scientists at the University of California, San Diego and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have described a new method for detecting liver cancer metastases in mice. The approach uses over-the-counter probiotics genetically programmed to produce signals easily detectable in urine when liver cancer metastases are present. [More]
UB researchers successfully harness E. coli to generate new forms of antibiotics

UB researchers successfully harness E. coli to generate new forms of antibiotics

Like a dairy farmer tending to a herd of cows to produce milk, researchers are tending to colonies of the bacteria Escherichia coli (E. coli) to produce new forms of antibiotics -- including three that show promise in fighting drug-resistant bacteria. [More]
MIT, UCSD researchers use probiotics to detect cancer in the liver

MIT, UCSD researchers use probiotics to detect cancer in the liver

Engineers at MIT and the University of California at San Diego have devised a new way to detect cancer that has spread to the liver, by enlisting help from probiotics — beneficial bacteria similar to those found in yogurt. [More]
Duke researchers reveal how bladder cells can eject UTI-causing bacteria

Duke researchers reveal how bladder cells can eject UTI-causing bacteria

Duke Medicine researchers have found that bladder cells have a highly effective way to combat E. coli bacteria that cause urinary tract infections (UTIs). [More]
Actavis creates collaborative program to improve care for patients with multidrug-resistant infections

Actavis creates collaborative program to improve care for patients with multidrug-resistant infections

Actavis plc, a leading global specialty pharmaceutical company committed to infectious disease treatment innovation, today announced the creation of SHARE ID (Sharing Hospital data to Advance Research and Enhance patient care in Infectious Diseases), a collaborative program to leverage real-world data to advance the delivery and effectiveness of care for patients with serious infections due to antibiotic-resistant pathogens. [More]
New tool could help identify pathogens in food and beverages

New tool could help identify pathogens in food and beverages

Researchers at the National Polytechnic Institute (IPN) in Mexico, developed a technology capable of identifying pathogens in food and beverages. This technique could work in the restaurant industry as a biosensor to detect in what conditions food is before being eaten in order to avoid possible gastrointestinal diseases. [More]
Phages in chicken meat can transfer antimicrobial resistance to bacteria

Phages in chicken meat can transfer antimicrobial resistance to bacteria

Bacteria resistant to antibiotics are on the rise. There are different explanations for how resistances are transferred. Researchers from the Vetmeduni Vienna found phages in chicken meat that are able to transfer antimicrobial resistance to bacteria. Phages are viruses that exclusively infect bacteria. They can contribute to the spread of antimicrobial resistance. [More]
Clinicians play key role in making consumers aware of the threats of foodborne diseases

Clinicians play key role in making consumers aware of the threats of foodborne diseases

Food safety awareness is key to understanding the food safety issues on the horizon, and clinicians at hospitals and doctors' offices play a key role in ensuring consumers are aware of the threats of foodborne illness, said the University of Georgia's Michael Doyle. [More]
New study suggests ways to accelerate recovery from dangerous diarrheal disease

New study suggests ways to accelerate recovery from dangerous diarrheal disease

A new study delineates a sequential pattern of changes in the intestinal microbial population of patients recovering from cholera in Bangladesh, findings that may point to ways of speeding recovery from the dangerous diarrheal disease. [More]

Great Basin Scientific revenue up 31% in first quarter 2015

Great Basin Scientific, Inc., a molecular diagnostic testing company, today reported earnings results for the quarter ended March 31, 2015. Revenue for the quarter was $458,730, which represented a 31 percent increase in year-over-year revenues, and Loss from Operations was $3.9 million. [More]
Researchers examine alternative antimicrobials to lower bacterial contamination in fresh produce

Researchers examine alternative antimicrobials to lower bacterial contamination in fresh produce

Nearly half of foodborne illnesses in the U.S. from 1998 through 2008 have been attributed to contaminated fresh produce. Prevention and control of bacterial contamination on fresh produce is critical to ensure food safety. The current strategy remains industrial washing of the product in water containing chlorine. However, due to sanitizer ineffectiveness there is an urgent need to identify alternative antimicrobials, particularly those of natural origin, for the produce industry. [More]
1 in 5 nursing home residents with dementia harbor strains of drug-resistant bacteria

1 in 5 nursing home residents with dementia harbor strains of drug-resistant bacteria

A new study found one in five nursing home residents with advanced dementia harbor strains of drug-resistant bacteria and more than 10 percent of the drug-resistant bacteria are resistant to four or more antibiotic classes. The research was published online today in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. [More]

Two UWM sensors offer protection against threat of contaminated water supplies

About 13.2 million households in the United States obtain their water from private wells, a method that offers no assurances of the water's quality. Testing private wells can be expensive and results can take weeks. [More]
Maple syrup makes disease-causing bacteria more susceptible to antibiotics, study shows

Maple syrup makes disease-causing bacteria more susceptible to antibiotics, study shows

A concentrated extract of maple syrup makes disease-causing bacteria more susceptible to antibiotics, according to laboratory experiments by researchers at McGill University. [More]
Nabriva Therapeutics completes $120 million Series B financing

Nabriva Therapeutics completes $120 million Series B financing

Nabriva Therapeutics AG, a biotechnology company focused on developing pleuromutilins, a new class of antibiotics for the treatment of serious infections caused by resistant gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, today announced the successful completion of a $120 million Series B financing. [More]
New model can help predict how humans adapt to high- and low-altitude hypoxia

New model can help predict how humans adapt to high- and low-altitude hypoxia

There are few times in life when one should aim for suboptimal performance, but new research at Rice University suggests scientists who study metabolism and its role in evolution should look for signs of just that. [More]
New data underscore global threats posed by unsafe foods

New data underscore global threats posed by unsafe foods

New data on the harm caused by foodborne illnesses underscore the global threats posed by unsafe foods, and the need for coordinated, cross-border action across the entire food supply chain, according to WHO, which next week is dedicating its annual World Health Day to the issue of food safety. [More]
TSRI scientists uncover unique mechanism of natural product with antimicrobial, anti-cancer effects

TSRI scientists uncover unique mechanism of natural product with antimicrobial, anti-cancer effects

Scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute have uncovered the unique mechanism of a powerful natural product with wide-ranging antifungal, antibacterial, anti-malaria and anti-cancer effects. [More]
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