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Henry Ford launches clinical trial for treatment of tinnitus caused by noise trauma

Henry Ford launches clinical trial for treatment of tinnitus caused by noise trauma

Henry Ford Health System has launched a clinical trial to investigate a new drug for the treatment of tinnitus, a chronic ringing of the head or ears that affects more than 600 million people worldwide. [More]
Guidance on use of Tamiflu needs to be reviewed in light of most recent evidence

Guidance on use of Tamiflu needs to be reviewed in light of most recent evidence

Tamiflu (the antiviral drug oseltamivir) shortens symptoms of influenza by half a day, but there is no good evidence to support claims that it reduces admissions to hospital or complications of influenza. [More]
ER physicians discount early signs of strokes among women, minorities, younger people

ER physicians discount early signs of strokes among women, minorities, younger people

Analyzing federal health care data, a team of researchers led by a Johns Hopkins specialist concluded that doctors overlook or discount the early signs of potentially disabling strokes in tens of thousands of American each year, a large number of them visitors to emergency rooms complaining of dizziness or headaches. [More]
Doctors overlook early signs of strokes in people each year

Doctors overlook early signs of strokes in people each year

Analyzing federal health care data, a team of researchers led by a Johns Hopkins specialist concluded that doctors overlook or discount the early signs of potentially disabling strokes in tens of thousands of American each year, a large number of them visitors to emergency rooms complaining of dizziness or headaches. [More]
School hearing tests cannot effectively detect adolescent high-frequency hearing loss

School hearing tests cannot effectively detect adolescent high-frequency hearing loss

School hearing tests cannot effectively detect adolescent high-frequency hearing loss, which is typically caused by loud noise exposure, according to researchers at Penn State College of Medicine. [More]
Study: Severe C. difficile infections occur among children who prescribed antibiotics in doctor's offices

Study: Severe C. difficile infections occur among children who prescribed antibiotics in doctor's offices

The majority of pediatric Clostridium difficile infections, which are bacterial infections that cause severe diarrhea and are potentially life-threatening, occur among children in the general community who recently took antibiotics prescribed in doctor's offices for other conditions, according to a new study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention published this week in Pediatrics. [More]
AOM associated with significant increases in direct costs incurred by consumers, health care system

AOM associated with significant increases in direct costs incurred by consumers, health care system

Acute otitis media, or ear infection, is the most common ailment among kids of preschool age and younger in the U.S., primarily because these children have immature middle-ear drainage systems, higher exposure to respiratory illnesses and undeveloped immune systems. [More]
Implanting tubes in ears is less likely to improve long-term cognitive and functional development

Implanting tubes in ears is less likely to improve long-term cognitive and functional development

Watchful waiting or ear tube surgery? It is a decision faced by millions of families of children with recurrent or chronic otitis media with effusion (non-infected fluid in the middle ear) each year. [More]
Smartphone-enabled otoscope provides clear images of ear tympanic membrane

Smartphone-enabled otoscope provides clear images of ear tympanic membrane

A new, smartphone-enabled otoscope provides clear, transmittable images of the ear drum, or tympanic membrane, which someday may allow for ear infection diagnosis without a visit to the doctor's office, according to an abstract presented Monday, Oct. 28, at the American Academy of Pediatrics National Conference and Exhibition in Orlando. [More]
Short-term hearing loss during childhood may lead to persistent hearing deficits

Short-term hearing loss during childhood may lead to persistent hearing deficits

Short-term hearing loss during childhood may lead to persistent hearing deficits, long after basic auditory sensitivity has returned to normal. The processing of sound in the brain is shaped by early experience. [More]
Physicians prescribe strongest antibiotics capable of killing multiple kinds of bacteria

Physicians prescribe strongest antibiotics capable of killing multiple kinds of bacteria

When U.S. physicians prescribe antibiotics, more than 60 percent of the time they choose some of the strongest types of antibiotics, referred to as "broad spectrum," which are capable of killing multiple kinds of bacteria, University of Utah researchers show in a new study. [More]
Emergency physicians correctly identify nearly 100% of patients with Bell's palsy

Emergency physicians correctly identify nearly 100% of patients with Bell's palsy

Emergency physicians correctly identified nearly 100 percent of patients with Bell's palsy, the symptoms of which are nearly identical to potentially life-threatening diseases such as stroke and brain tumors. [More]
Switching to new ICD-10 codes

Switching to new ICD-10 codes

University of Illinois at Chicago researchers have developed a website that walks healthcare providers through the challenging transition from the current International Classification of Diseases -- ICD-9 -- to the new ICD-10. [More]
Amoxicillin effectiveness: an interview with Prof Paul Little, University of Southampton

Amoxicillin effectiveness: an interview with Prof Paul Little, University of Southampton

Amoxicillin is a broad spectrum penicillin, and in the UK is one of the most frequently used antibiotics. It is commonly used either on its own or, where there are particular concerns about resistance, in combination as Co-amoxiclav (as Amoxicillin-clavulanic acid) which extends its anti-bacterial spectrum. [More]
Measles: an interview with Dr. Robert Perry, World Health Organization

Measles: an interview with Dr. Robert Perry, World Health Organization

Measles is a disease marked by fever, rash, and cold symptoms (red eyes, cough, runny nose) that results in a temporary suppression of the immune system and a drop in vitamin A levels. [More]
Inflammatory marker targeted in ear infection

Inflammatory marker targeted in ear infection

Systemic injection of an antibody against granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor inhibits middle-ear inflammation induced by lipopolysaccharide in mice, study findings show. [More]
Retail clinics could undermine primary care patient-physician relationships

Retail clinics could undermine primary care patient-physician relationships

Using retail walk-in health clinics, often located inside pharmacies or big-box stores, for simple acute care problems can interfere with establishing and maintaining a relationship with a primary care provider, finds a new study in the Journal of General Internal Medicine. [More]
Eliminating bacteria's DNA, boosting antimicrobial proteins may help prevent recurrent ear infections

Eliminating bacteria's DNA, boosting antimicrobial proteins may help prevent recurrent ear infections

Eliminating bacteria's DNA and boosting antimicrobial proteins that already exist may help prevent middle ear infections from reoccurring. These are the findings from a Nationwide Children's Hospital study that examined how an immune defense protein common in the middle ear interacts with a structure meant to protect a colony of bacteria. [More]
Bacterial pathogen ‘acutely’ involved in otitis media

Bacterial pathogen ‘acutely’ involved in otitis media

Alloiococcus otitidis can be a dominant bacterial pathogen among indigenous Australian children with acute otitis media with perforation, although its main role appears to be that of a secondary pathogen, preliminary study findings suggest. [More]
Top-line data from Pfizer’s Prevenar 13 Phase 3 trial on pneumococcal disease

Top-line data from Pfizer’s Prevenar 13 Phase 3 trial on pneumococcal disease

Pfizer Inc. today announced top-line data assessing immunogenicity, tolerability and safety of Prevenar 13 (Pneumococcal polysaccharide conjugate vaccine [13-valent, absorbed]) in adults 18 to 49 years of age. [More]