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Eczema or atopic dermatitis is a long-lasting, itchy inflammatory condition of the skin which may become red, dry, blistered, crusted, scaly or thickened.

Eczema can affect any part of the skin but most commonly manifests in parts of the body where skin folds are found such as the elbows or backs of the knees. The cause of eczema is not yet known but it is thought to involve an inherited tendency towards sensitive skin.

Although eczema can flare up for no apparent reason, sufferers may notice particular triggers that seem to worsen their condition. Some common examples are allergens such as pollen, house dust mites or pet fur, irritants such as detergents and soaps and rough clothing fabrics such as wool. Rarely, certain foods such as milk, eggs, wheat or nuts may trigger a flare-up.

Although eczema cannot be cured, it can be controlled by avoiding any known triggers of the condition. A range of medications are also available to help control symptoms and emollients in the form of creams, lotions, or oils can prevent dehydration of the skin and help it repair as well as relieving itchiness.

In the UK, up to 20% of children and up to 10% of adults have eczema and the condition is equally common in men and women.
New mathematical model suggests how AD may progress to become chronic

New mathematical model suggests how AD may progress to become chronic

Successive flare-ups of the most common form of eczema may trigger an immune system overreaction, causing it to become a long-term condition in people. [More]
Cost effective moisturizers could help prevent eczema in high-risk newborns

Cost effective moisturizers could help prevent eczema in high-risk newborns

What if it was possible to prevent your child from getting eczema -- a costly, inflammatory skin disorder -- just by applying something as inexpensive as petroleum jelly every day for the first six months of his or her life? [More]
New insights into epidermal cells could explain how skin maintains barrier when shedding

New insights into epidermal cells could explain how skin maintains barrier when shedding

The discovery of the shape and binding capability of epidermal cells could explain how skin maintains a barrier even when it is shedding. [More]
Experts characterize racial and ethnic differences in food allergies among U.S. children

Experts characterize racial and ethnic differences in food allergies among U.S. children

Allergy and immunology experts at Rush University Medical Center, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center and Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago have conducted the first study designed to assess and characterize the racial and ethnic difference in food allergies among children in the U.S. [More]
Study shows new drug combination effective in treating precancerous skin lesions

Study shows new drug combination effective in treating precancerous skin lesions

A combination of two topical drugs that have been in use for years triggers a robust immune response against precancerous skin lesions, according to a new study. The research, from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and Harvard Medical School, shows that the therapy activates the immune system's T cells, which then attack the abnormal skin cells. [More]
Increased prevalence of food allergy linked to early skin infection and eczema

Increased prevalence of food allergy linked to early skin infection and eczema

Early exposure to a food allergen through broken skin might prompt the development of food allergy. [More]
Doctor Developed creates new cream with natural ingredients for safe, effective eczema treatment

Doctor Developed creates new cream with natural ingredients for safe, effective eczema treatment

Doctor Developed, LLC was founded by well-known cosmetic surgeon Dr. Amir Yazdan in his pursuit of a better eczema treatment for a family friend. [More]
New guidelines offer way for parents to introduce peanut-containing foods to reduce allergy risk

New guidelines offer way for parents to introduce peanut-containing foods to reduce allergy risk

Parents may be confused with how and when to introduce peanut-containing foods to their infants. [More]
Scientists develop new strategy to stop uncontrollable poison ivy itch

Scientists develop new strategy to stop uncontrollable poison ivy itch

Scientists at Duke Health and Zhejiang Chinese Medical University have developed a strategy to stop the uncontrollable itch caused by urushiol, the oily sap common to poison ivy, poison sumac, poison oak and even mango trees. [More]
Dermatologist shares tips to keep skin in good shape during winter

Dermatologist shares tips to keep skin in good shape during winter

The dreary British weather can play havoc with our skin, especially for those with existing skin conditions like eczema or psoriasis. [More]
Discovery of neuropilin 2 deficiency may lead to new therapies for edema and lymphedema

Discovery of neuropilin 2 deficiency may lead to new therapies for edema and lymphedema

Fluid accumulation and swelling (edema) may result from the malfunctioning of regulatory processes controlling vessel permeability in the body. [More]
New study finds no evidence of benefit from genetic disposition of eczema

New study finds no evidence of benefit from genetic disposition of eczema

Some genetic diseases persist for generation after generation because the genes that cause them can benefit human health. [More]
Study opens door towards personalized medicine for children with eczema

Study opens door towards personalized medicine for children with eczema

Atopic dermatitis, or eczema, is a common skin disorder that usually starts by 5 years of age, but virtually all of the studies that have defined the immune changes underlying eczema and are directing new treatment options have been done in adult skin. [More]
Maternal serum levels of nicotinamide linked to child’s risk of atopic eczema

Maternal serum levels of nicotinamide linked to child’s risk of atopic eczema

Infants whose mothers had a higher level of a particular type of vitamin B during pregnancy have a lower risk of eczema at age 12 months, new Southampton research has shown. [More]
Skin phenotype of pediatric eczema opens door for personalized treatment of AD in infants

Skin phenotype of pediatric eczema opens door for personalized treatment of AD in infants

Researchers for the first time have identified the skin phenotype of pediatric eczema or atopic dermatitis (AD) in infants, opening the door for personalized treatment approaches for young children with eczema. [More]
Introducing egg and peanut at early age may prevent development of childhood allergy

Introducing egg and peanut at early age may prevent development of childhood allergy

Feeding babies egg and peanut may reduce their risk of developing an allergy to the foods, finds a new study. [More]
Study shows retinoic acid could prevent postsurgical lymphedema

Study shows retinoic acid could prevent postsurgical lymphedema

A study conducted at the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California showed that 9-cis retinoic acid (alitretinoin) could significantly prevent postsurgical lymphedema. [More]
Food intolerance testing: an interview with Dr Gill Hart

Food intolerance testing: an interview with Dr Gill Hart

Food intolerances are caused by adverse reactions to food or drink ingredients in your body. These are very different to food allergies. It is estimated that up to forty-five percent of the population suffers from food intolerances. [More]
Dermatologist offers tips to help parents figure out how often children need to bathe

Dermatologist offers tips to help parents figure out how often children need to bathe

For many families, bath time is a struggle. For this reason, many parents will be glad to know that a daily bath may not be necessary for their kids, according to dermatologists from the American Academy of Dermatology. [More]
Early life exposure to antibiotics found to increase allergy risk later in life

Early life exposure to antibiotics found to increase allergy risk later in life

An analysis of almost 400,000 people has shown that exposure to antibiotics in early life is linked to an increased risk of developing allergies later in life. [More]
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