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Eczema or atopic dermatitis is a long-lasting, itchy inflammatory condition of the skin which may become red, dry, blistered, crusted, scaly or thickened.

Eczema can affect any part of the skin but most commonly manifests in parts of the body where skin folds are found such as the elbows or backs of the knees. The cause of eczema is not yet known but it is thought to involve an inherited tendency towards sensitive skin.

Although eczema can flare up for no apparent reason, sufferers may notice particular triggers that seem to worsen their condition. Some common examples are allergens such as pollen, house dust mites or pet fur, irritants such as detergents and soaps and rough clothing fabrics such as wool. Rarely, certain foods such as milk, eggs, wheat or nuts may trigger a flare-up.

Although eczema cannot be cured, it can be controlled by avoiding any known triggers of the condition. A range of medications are also available to help control symptoms and emollients in the form of creams, lotions, or oils can prevent dehydration of the skin and help it repair as well as relieving itchiness.

In the UK, up to 20% of children and up to 10% of adults have eczema and the condition is equally common in men and women.
Hygiene hypothesis: a misleading misnomer? An interview with Professor Sally Bloomfield

Hygiene hypothesis: a misleading misnomer? An interview with Professor Sally Bloomfield

Professor Strachan first proposed the hygiene hypothesis back in 1989. Reviewing the evidence, he suggested that one of the causes of the recent rapid rise in allergic diseases in children was lack of exposure to childhood infections [More]
ATS releases guidelines to help pediatricians evaluate infants with recurrent, persistent wheezing

ATS releases guidelines to help pediatricians evaluate infants with recurrent, persistent wheezing

The American Thoracic Society has issued clinical practice guidelines to help pediatricians and pediatric pulmonologists evaluate infants with recurrent or persistent wheezing. [More]
One in four dermatology nurses likely to be the only regular home visitor for patients, survey reveals

One in four dermatology nurses likely to be the only regular home visitor for patients, survey reveals

Almost one in four nurses reported that they were likely to be the only regular visitor for around half of the patients they see at home in a recent survey by the British Skin Foundation. [More]
Eczema can increase patients' risk of developing several other health conditions

Eczema can increase patients' risk of developing several other health conditions

When a patient is diagnosed with eczema, the diagnosis of another medical condition may not be far behind. [More]
Study finds link between eczema and S. aureus bacteria

Study finds link between eczema and S. aureus bacteria

A new study published in the British Journal of Dermatology has shown that, on average, 70% of eczema patients are colonised with Staphylococcus aureus bacteria (S. aureus, including MRSA) on their skin lesions. [More]
FDA approves new topical retinoid gel for OTC treatment of acne

FDA approves new topical retinoid gel for OTC treatment of acne

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Differin Gel 0.1% (adapalene), a once-daily topical gel for the over-the-counter (OTC) treatment of acne. Differin Gel 0.1% is approved for use in people 12 years of age and older. [More]
Subcutaneous treatment with cord blood stem cells improves eczema symptoms

Subcutaneous treatment with cord blood stem cells improves eczema symptoms

A new study suggests that treatment with stem cells from umbilical cord blood might be an effective therapy for patients with moderate-to-severe eczema, or atopic dermatitis. [More]
Zinbryta gets FDA approval for treating adults with relapsing forms of MS

Zinbryta gets FDA approval for treating adults with relapsing forms of MS

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Zinbryta (daclizumab) for the treatment of adults with relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis (MS). Zinbryta is a long-acting injection that is self- administered by the patient monthly. [More]
Food-triggered atopic dermatitis in children may lead to life-threatening anaphylaxis risk

Food-triggered atopic dermatitis in children may lead to life-threatening anaphylaxis risk

Elimination of the food that triggers atopic dermatitis, or eczema, is associated with increased risk of developing immediate reactions to that food, according to the results of a large-scale study recently published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. [More]
Domestic water hardness linked to eczema risk in children

Domestic water hardness linked to eczema risk in children

High levels of water hardness in the home may be linked to the development of eczema early in life, according to a new study led by King's College London. [More]
UA researchers one step closer to preventing asthma in children

UA researchers one step closer to preventing asthma in children

Efforts to improve the health of children at increased risk for asthma will receive a major boost with the launch of a new University of Arizona Health Sciences-led, federally funded national clinical study. For Fernando D. Martinez, MD, and his colleagues at the UA Asthma and Airway Disease Research Center, this study follows 30 years of research to prevent and cure this chronic disease. [More]
Study shows canine AD shares significant features of human version

Study shows canine AD shares significant features of human version

Atopic dermatitis (AD), a chronic inflammatory skin condition and the most common form of eczema, is estimated to afflict as much as 10 percent of the U.S. population, and is much more common now than it was 50 years ago. Veterinary clinical estimates also show that approximately 10 percent of dogs have atopic dermatitis. [More]
Southampton researchers link birth season epigenetic DNA marks to allergic disease

Southampton researchers link birth season epigenetic DNA marks to allergic disease

Researchers at the University of Southampton have discovered specific markers on DNA that link the season of birth to risk of allergy in later life. [More]
Research shows probiotic B. longum KACC 91563 has ability to reduce effects of food allergies

Research shows probiotic B. longum KACC 91563 has ability to reduce effects of food allergies

Lactobacillus might sound familiar when the topic of probiotics comes up, but they are only one of many types of bacteria that have proven health benefits. [More]
Study assesses health problems related to food hypersensitivity

Study assesses health problems related to food hypersensitivity

A study by researchers at the University of Southampton and Southampton General Hospital, is the first to assess the prevalence of two different types of food hypersensitivity and the risk factors associated with them. [More]
Romosozumab for postmenopausal women with osteoporosis meets co-primary endpoints in Phase 3 study

Romosozumab for postmenopausal women with osteoporosis meets co-primary endpoints in Phase 3 study

Amgen and UCB today announced top-line results from the Phase 3 placebo-controlled FRActure study in postmenopausal woMen with ostEoporosis (FRAME). [More]
Organic meat and milk contain more beneficial omega-3 fatty acids than conventional

Organic meat and milk contain more beneficial omega-3 fatty acids than conventional

In the largest study of its kind, an international team of experts led by Newcastle University, UK, has shown that both organic milk and meat contain around 50% more beneficial omega-3 fatty acids than conventionally produced products. [More]
Study: Many school children avoid basic foods due to perceived hypersensitivity

Study: Many school children avoid basic foods due to perceived hypersensitivity

A study on hypersensitivity to the basic foods milk, egg, fish and wheat among young school children showed that reported food hypersensitivity was eight times more common than allergies confirmed by allergy tests. This according to a new dissertation at UmeƄ University. [More]
Amgen announces approval of cholesterol-lowering medication Repatha (evolocumab) Injection in Japan

Amgen announces approval of cholesterol-lowering medication Repatha (evolocumab) Injection in Japan

Amgen today announced that the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare has approved the cholesterol-lowering medication Repatha (evolocumab) Injection, the first proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) inhibitor to be approved in Japan. [More]
Toxins in staphylococcus bacteria can help cancer cells gain control over healthy cells

Toxins in staphylococcus bacteria can help cancer cells gain control over healthy cells

Our skin is covered in millions of bacteria and most of them help keep us healthy. However, for patients with lymphoma, it may be a rather different story, as new research from the University of Copenhagen shows that toxins in the staphylococcus bacteria help cancer cells gain control over healthy cells. [More]
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