Eczema News and Research RSS Feed - Eczema News and Research

Eczema or atopic dermatitis is a long-lasting, itchy inflammatory condition of the skin which may become red, dry, blistered, crusted, scaly or thickened.

Eczema can affect any part of the skin but most commonly manifests in parts of the body where skin folds are found such as the elbows or backs of the knees. The cause of eczema is not yet known but it is thought to involve an inherited tendency towards sensitive skin.

Although eczema can flare up for no apparent reason, sufferers may notice particular triggers that seem to worsen their condition. Some common examples are allergens such as pollen, house dust mites or pet fur, irritants such as detergents and soaps and rough clothing fabrics such as wool. Rarely, certain foods such as milk, eggs, wheat or nuts may trigger a flare-up.

Although eczema cannot be cured, it can be controlled by avoiding any known triggers of the condition. A range of medications are also available to help control symptoms and emollients in the form of creams, lotions, or oils can prevent dehydration of the skin and help it repair as well as relieving itchiness.

In the UK, up to 20% of children and up to 10% of adults have eczema and the condition is equally common in men and women.
Maternal serum levels of nicotinamide linked to child’s risk of atopic eczema

Maternal serum levels of nicotinamide linked to child’s risk of atopic eczema

Infants whose mothers had a higher level of a particular type of vitamin B during pregnancy have a lower risk of eczema at age 12 months, new Southampton research has shown. [More]
Skin phenotype of pediatric eczema opens door for personalized treatment of AD in infants

Skin phenotype of pediatric eczema opens door for personalized treatment of AD in infants

Researchers for the first time have identified the skin phenotype of pediatric eczema or atopic dermatitis (AD) in infants, opening the door for personalized treatment approaches for young children with eczema. [More]
Introducing egg and peanut at early age may prevent development of childhood allergy

Introducing egg and peanut at early age may prevent development of childhood allergy

Feeding babies egg and peanut may reduce their risk of developing an allergy to the foods, finds a new study. [More]
Study shows retinoic acid could prevent postsurgical lymphedema

Study shows retinoic acid could prevent postsurgical lymphedema

A study conducted at the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California showed that 9-cis retinoic acid (alitretinoin) could significantly prevent postsurgical lymphedema. [More]
Food intolerance testing: an interview with Dr Gill Hart

Food intolerance testing: an interview with Dr Gill Hart

Food intolerances are caused by adverse reactions to food or drink ingredients in your body. These are very different to food allergies. It is estimated that up to forty-five percent of the population suffers from food intolerances. [More]
Dermatologist offers tips to help parents figure out how often children need to bathe

Dermatologist offers tips to help parents figure out how often children need to bathe

For many families, bath time is a struggle. For this reason, many parents will be glad to know that a daily bath may not be necessary for their kids, according to dermatologists from the American Academy of Dermatology. [More]
Early life exposure to antibiotics found to increase allergy risk later in life

Early life exposure to antibiotics found to increase allergy risk later in life

An analysis of almost 400,000 people has shown that exposure to antibiotics in early life is linked to an increased risk of developing allergies later in life. [More]
Early life use of antibiotics linked to higher risk of developing allergies later in life

Early life use of antibiotics linked to higher risk of developing allergies later in life

Research presented today (6 September, 2016) at this year's European Respiratory Society International Congress in London, UK shows that exposure to antibiotics early in life is related to increased risk of developing allergies later in life. [More]
Exposure to antibiotics in early life linked to increased food allergy risk

Exposure to antibiotics in early life linked to increased food allergy risk

Antibiotic treatment within the first year of life may wipe out more than an unwanted infection: exposure to the drugs is associated with an increase in food allergy diagnosis, new research from the University of South Carolina suggests. [More]
MRSA correlated to eczema? An interview with Dr Bjorn Herpers

MRSA correlated to eczema? An interview with Dr Bjorn Herpers

There is a lot of evidence that Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is involved in eczema. Eczema is now thought to be caused by a barrier dysfunction of the skin that allows external triggers to cause an overshoot of inflammation. [More]
Could a light-listening photonics device detect skin disease? An interview with Prof. Vasilis Ntziachristos

Could a light-listening photonics device detect skin disease? An interview with Prof. Vasilis Ntziachristos

Detection of malignant skin alterations is currently aided by optical microscopes such as dermoscopes or optical microscopes. While the latter offers high resolution, it comes with a major disadvantage, just like any other purely microscopic method: it only provides a partial view of the skin due to the low penetration depth. [More]
Children with existing food allergy at increased risk of developing asthma and rhinitis

Children with existing food allergy at increased risk of developing asthma and rhinitis

Children with a history of food allergy have a high risk of developing asthma and allergic rhinitis during childhood as well. [More]
Hygiene hypothesis: a misleading misnomer? An interview with Professor Sally Bloomfield

Hygiene hypothesis: a misleading misnomer? An interview with Professor Sally Bloomfield

Professor Strachan first proposed the hygiene hypothesis back in 1989. Reviewing the evidence, he suggested that one of the causes of the recent rapid rise in allergic diseases in children was lack of exposure to childhood infections [More]
ATS releases guidelines to help pediatricians evaluate infants with recurrent, persistent wheezing

ATS releases guidelines to help pediatricians evaluate infants with recurrent, persistent wheezing

The American Thoracic Society has issued clinical practice guidelines to help pediatricians and pediatric pulmonologists evaluate infants with recurrent or persistent wheezing. [More]
One in four dermatology nurses likely to be the only regular home visitor for patients, survey reveals

One in four dermatology nurses likely to be the only regular home visitor for patients, survey reveals

Almost one in four nurses reported that they were likely to be the only regular visitor for around half of the patients they see at home in a recent survey by the British Skin Foundation. [More]
Eczema can increase patients' risk of developing several other health conditions

Eczema can increase patients' risk of developing several other health conditions

When a patient is diagnosed with eczema, the diagnosis of another medical condition may not be far behind. [More]
Study finds link between eczema and S. aureus bacteria

Study finds link between eczema and S. aureus bacteria

A new study published in the British Journal of Dermatology has shown that, on average, 70% of eczema patients are colonised with Staphylococcus aureus bacteria (S. aureus, including MRSA) on their skin lesions. [More]
FDA approves new topical retinoid gel for OTC treatment of acne

FDA approves new topical retinoid gel for OTC treatment of acne

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Differin Gel 0.1% (adapalene), a once-daily topical gel for the over-the-counter (OTC) treatment of acne. Differin Gel 0.1% is approved for use in people 12 years of age and older. [More]
Subcutaneous treatment with cord blood stem cells improves eczema symptoms

Subcutaneous treatment with cord blood stem cells improves eczema symptoms

A new study suggests that treatment with stem cells from umbilical cord blood might be an effective therapy for patients with moderate-to-severe eczema, or atopic dermatitis. [More]
Zinbryta gets FDA approval for treating adults with relapsing forms of MS

Zinbryta gets FDA approval for treating adults with relapsing forms of MS

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Zinbryta (daclizumab) for the treatment of adults with relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis (MS). Zinbryta is a long-acting injection that is self- administered by the patient monthly. [More]
Advertisement