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All Together Better Health conference to be held in Pittsburgh this June

The biennial All Together Better Health conference will hold its first U.S. meeting in Pittsburgh this June to highlight the latest research on interprofessionalism and team-based health care delivery. The international conference serves as a forum for health system executives, educational leaders and policy makers to share new studies and shape the future of the health care workforce. [More]

VACC designs new program to educate industry professionals on vascular access

Understanding the needs of health providers and their interaction with patients is paramount to the role of the employees of ICU Medical which provides clinicians around the world with innovative and cost-effective solutions for clinical needs. [More]
Penn study clarifies action of potential new class of pain relievers that may benefit and not hurt heart

Penn study clarifies action of potential new class of pain relievers that may benefit and not hurt heart

Nonsteroidal antinflamatory drugs (NSAIDs) that block an enzyme called COX-2 relieve pain and inflammation but can cause heart attacks, stroke, heart failure, and even sudden cardiac death. [More]

Study helps physicians better identify patients at risk of acute respiratory distress syndrome

Acute respiratory distress syndrome is a leading cause of respiratory failure after surgery. Patients who develop the lung disorder postoperatively are at higher risk of dying in the hospital, and those who survive the syndrome may still bear its physical effects years later. [More]
Vivere-Winter Park recognizes 25th Annual National Infertility Awareness Week

Vivere-Winter Park recognizes 25th Annual National Infertility Awareness Week

Infertility is a disease affecting more than 7 million people across the U.S., according to the National Survey of Family Growth. That number represents 12 percent of women of childbearing age or one in eight couples. [More]
CT angiography provides accurate assessment of arterial plaque in diabetic patients

CT angiography provides accurate assessment of arterial plaque in diabetic patients

Imaging of the coronary arteries with computed tomography (CT) angiography provides an accurate assessment of arterial plaque and could have a dramatic impact on the management of diabetic patients who face a high risk of heart attacks and other cardiovascular events, according to a new multicenter study published online in the journal Radiology. [More]
Study shows mechanistic link between sleep loss in early life and adult behavior in animal model

Study shows mechanistic link between sleep loss in early life and adult behavior in animal model

Mom always said you need your sleep, and it turns out, she was right. According to a new study published in Science this week from researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, lack of sleep in young fruit flies profoundly diminishes their ability to do one thing they do really, really well - make more flies. [More]

Researchers study evolution of harmful organisms from 1 bacterial family

For the first time, researchers have studied the Black Death bacterium's entire family tree to fully understand how some of the family members evolve to become harmful. [More]
AARDA launches autoimmune curriculum for teachers of grades three through eight

AARDA launches autoimmune curriculum for teachers of grades three through eight

Furthering its mission of educating all Americans about autoimmunity and autoimmune disease (AD), the American Autoimmune Related Diseases Association, Inc. (AARDA) has launched the first-of-its kind autoimmune curriculum for teachers of grades three through eight. [More]

Researchers examine link between alcoholism and loss of muscle strength

Muscle weakness is a common symptom of both long-time alcoholics and patients with mitochondrial disease. Now researchers have found a common link: mitochondria that are unable to self-repair. [More]
Small gene embedded in large gene contributes to development of acute myeloid leukemia

Small gene embedded in large gene contributes to development of acute myeloid leukemia

A small gene that is embedded in a larger, well-known gene is the true leukemia-promoting force usually attributed to the larger gene, according to a new study by researchers at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute (OSUCCC - James). [More]

New Aspen Dental office opens in Pickerington, OH

A new Aspen Dental office is opening in Pickerington, OH on Thursday, April 17. Located at 10705 Blacklick Eastern Rd 100, the conveniently located practice will provide dental services that range from dentures and preventive care to general dentistry and restoration. [More]
Study points to new therapeutic strategy for treating depression

Study points to new therapeutic strategy for treating depression

A new study points to a conceptually novel therapeutic strategy for treating depression. Instead of dampening neuron firing found with stress-induced depression, researchers demonstrated for the first time that further activating these neurons opens a new avenue to mimic and promote natural resilience. [More]
MEDNAX acquires Fredericksburg Anesthesia Associates

MEDNAX acquires Fredericksburg Anesthesia Associates

MEDNAX, Inc., today announced the acquisition of Fredericksburg Anesthesia Associates, Inc., a private practice physician group based in Fredericksburg, Va. The practice will become part of MEDNAX's American Anesthesiology division and is the third Virginia-based anesthesia practice to join the division. [More]
New hypothesis about emergence of Parkinson's disease

New hypothesis about emergence of Parkinson's disease

The cause of neuronal death in Parkinson's disease is still unknown, but a new study proposes that neurons may be mistaken for foreign invaders and killed by the person's own immune system, similar to the way autoimmune diseases like type I diabetes, celiac disease, and multiple sclerosis attack the body's cells. [More]

Vanderbilt participates in national study to evaluate effectiveness of group prenatal care

Vanderbilt University hopes to enroll about 400 women in a national study to evaluate the effectiveness of a new model of group prenatal care designed to improve the health and well-being of mothers and babies during pregnancy, birth and infancy. [More]
Evidence-based interventions provide promising strategies for reducing racial, ethnic health disparities

Evidence-based interventions provide promising strategies for reducing racial, ethnic health disparities

Evidence-based interventions at the local and national levels provide promising strategies for reducing racial and ethnic health disparities related to HIV infection rates, immunization coverage, motor vehicle injuries and deaths, and smoking, according to a new report by the CDC's Office of Minority Health and Health Equity. [More]

Cedars-Sinai nurses screening hospitalized patients for signs of depression

In an effort to identify and treat patients with undiagnosed depression, Cedars-Sinai nurses are screening each hospitalized patient for signs of the illness and for risk factors that could make recoveries harder and longer. [More]

IV-administered ketamine effective in patients with chronic PTSD

For the first time, evidence that a single dose of IV-administered ketamine was associated with the rapid reduction of symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder in patients with chronic PTSD was demonstrated in a proof-of-concept, randomized, double blind crossover study, undertaken by researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City. These findings, according to Mount Sinai researchers, could be the first step toward developing new interventions for PTSD. [More]
Scientists lay groundwork for understanding immune responses in Lyme disease patients

Scientists lay groundwork for understanding immune responses in Lyme disease patients

A team of scientists led by Johns Hopkins and Stanford University researchers has laid the groundwork for understanding how variations in immune responses to Lyme disease can contribute to the many different outcomes of this bacterial infection seen in individual patients. A report on the work appears online April 16 in PLOS One. [More]