Education News and Research RSS Feed - Education News and Research

Study focuses on improving therapeutic outcomes in cancer patients through diet-drug combination

Study focuses on improving therapeutic outcomes in cancer patients through diet-drug combination

Boosting anti-cancer immunity through diet and novel drug therapies—that's the idea behind a collaborative project involving researchers from the South Dakota State University College of Pharmacy and Sanford Research in Sioux Falls. [More]
Study suggests benefits of calorie restriction on healthy aging

Study suggests benefits of calorie restriction on healthy aging

Targeting mechanisms in the central nervous system that sense energy generated by nutrients might yield the beneficial effects of low-calorie diets on healthy aging without the need to alter food intake, suggests new research from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. [More]

End-of-life care documents cause confusion among emergency physicians, prehospital care providers

Emergency care providers vary in their understanding of a type of medical order intended to communicate seriously ill patients' choices for life-sustaining treatments, according to a pair of studies in the March Journal of Patient Safety. [More]

Study explores thoughts among accredited physical therapy schools on pain education

A study published in The Journal of Pain showed that just 2 of 3 accredited physical therapy (PT) schools surveyed believe their students receive adequate education in pain management. [More]
STS releases first publicly accessible national report of surgical outcomes from CHSD

STS releases first publicly accessible national report of surgical outcomes from CHSD

Continuing its commitment to increase public awareness and understanding of cardiothoracic surgical outcomes, The Society of Thoracic Surgeons has released the first publicly accessible national report of surgical outcomes from its Congenital Heart Surgery Database (CHSD). [More]
Carnegie Mellon study identifies intermediary neuron system that acts as synaptic cloaking device

Carnegie Mellon study identifies intermediary neuron system that acts as synaptic cloaking device

Neuroscientists believe that the connectome, a map of each and every connection between the millions of neurons in the brain, will provide a blueprint that will allow them to link brain anatomy to brain function. But a new study from Carnegie Mellon University has found that a specific type of neuron might be thwarting their efforts at mapping the connectome by temporarily cloaking the synapses that link a wide field of neurons. [More]
New study shows how anterior cingulate cortex can be stimulated to control pain

New study shows how anterior cingulate cortex can be stimulated to control pain

A new study by a University of Texas at Arlington physics team in collaboration with bioengineering and psychology researchers shows for the first time how a small area of the brain can be optically stimulated to control pain. [More]
EORTC researchers review potential treatment options for patients with locally advanced breast cancer

EORTC researchers review potential treatment options for patients with locally advanced breast cancer

Treating patients with locally advanced inoperable breast cancer is an extremely difficult task. The overwhelming majority of patients treated for this disease suffer relapse and, despite the best multimodal treatment, do not survive. There is a medical need to examine current and potential treatments, and EORTC researchers have recently published an article in Nature Reviews Clinical Oncology concerning this topic. [More]
New initiative aims to provide women in developing countries with access to adequate water sources

New initiative aims to provide women in developing countries with access to adequate water sources

Imagine a day in which your access to clean, drinkable water ceased and you could not shower or bathe properly and you had no one to help you. For more than 783 million people around the world, that day was today. In 2015, more than 2.5 billion people will also lack access to basic sanitation in the developing world. [More]
New online tool helps educate practicing oncologists with therapeutic decision-making for NSCLC

New online tool helps educate practicing oncologists with therapeutic decision-making for NSCLC

A new interactive online tool helps educate practicing oncologists worldwide with therapeutic decision-making for advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) based on a patient's molecular and clinical characteristics by providing feedback from an expert panel. [More]
Study explores association between back pain and depression

Study explores association between back pain and depression

Genetic factors help to explain the commonly found association between low back pain and depression, suggests a large study of twins in the March issue of PAIN, the official publication of the International Association for the Study of Pain. The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer. [More]

Unique research consortium focuses on musculoskeletal disorders and diseases

The Kansas City University of Medicine and Biosciences, the University of Missouri – Kansas City and the University of Kansas Medical Center proudly announce a research consortium among the three Kansas City-area institutions. The consortium brings together scientists and resources focused on the research of musculoskeletal disorders and diseases. [More]
Researchers introduce the idea of using sewage to study human microbiome

Researchers introduce the idea of using sewage to study human microbiome

A new study demonstrates that sewage is an effective means to sample the fecal bacteria from millions of people. Researchers say the information gleaned from the work provides a unique opportunity to monitor, through gut microbes, the public health of a large population without compromising the privacy of individuals. [More]
New study identifies genetic link to peanut allergy

New study identifies genetic link to peanut allergy

Researchers have pinpointed a region in the human genome associated with peanut allergy in U.S. children, offering strong evidence that genes can play a role in the development of food allergies. [More]
Monell Center to promote Anosmia Awareness Day with new educational outreach initiatives

Monell Center to promote Anosmia Awareness Day with new educational outreach initiatives

The Monell Center announces three new educational outreach initiatives to promote Anosmia Awareness Day, which takes place on February 27. Each was designed to increase awareness and increase the limited information currently available about anosmia, the loss of our sense of smell, which affects over six million Americans and many millions more worldwide. [More]
Orthokeratology technique slows progression of myopia in children

Orthokeratology technique slows progression of myopia in children

A technique called orthokeratology ("Ortho-K")--using custom-made contact lenses to shape the growing eye--has a significant effect in slowing the progression of myopia (nearsightedness) in children, according to a research review in the March issue of Optometry and Vision Science, official journal of the American Academy of Optometry. [More]
New, first-of-its-kind app helps patients with chronic pain track opioid use

New, first-of-its-kind app helps patients with chronic pain track opioid use

A new, first-of-its-kind app has launched to help patients suffering from chronic pain track their opioid use and measure pain levels to assist with the safe use of opioids. [More]
Griffith School of Pharmacy provides innovative virtual learning environment for students

Griffith School of Pharmacy provides innovative virtual learning environment for students

Griffith School of Pharmacy's innovative virtual learning environment has opened just in time for the new students to be introduced to a whole new way of learning. [More]
Smokers who quit early does not qualify for lung cancer screening, say Mayo Clinic researchers

Smokers who quit early does not qualify for lung cancer screening, say Mayo Clinic researchers

A decline in smoking rates may mean that many people who could have benefited from early detection of lung cancer are dying because they don't qualify for low-dose CT scans, according to a group of Mayo Clinic researchers. [More]

UA researcher receives NSF award to improve deployment of wireless sensor networks

Jing Yang, an assistant professor in the College of Engineering at the University of Arkansas, has received a $500,000 Faculty Early Career Development Program award from the National Science Foundation to continue developing sensing and transmission systems for energy-harvesting, wireless sensor networks. [More]