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AUDs have negative prognostic outcome with higher mortality risks in patients with HCV infection

AUDs have negative prognostic outcome with higher mortality risks in patients with HCV infection

Results presented today at The International Liver Congress 2015, show that alcohol use disorders (AUD) have a serious, negative prognostic outcome with higher mortality risks in the general population and patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in particular. [More]
Hartford Foundation grant to support evaluation of long-term nursing home resident care model

Hartford Foundation grant to support evaluation of long-term nursing home resident care model

Approximately 1.4 million older adults in America live in nursing homes. A new grant from the John A. Hartford Foundation will enable clinician-researchers from the Indiana University Center for Aging Research and the Regenstrief Institute and their partners, to prepare for the expansion of OPTIMISTIC, their long-term nursing home resident care model. [More]
Record number of abstracts submitted to Heart Failure 2015

Record number of abstracts submitted to Heart Failure 2015

A record number of abstracts have been submitted to the world's leading heart failure congress, promising more original science than ever before. [More]

Study: Most California residents with mental illness experience high levels of discrimination

Most California residents facing psychological distress do not perceive the public as being supportive, with a large proportion reporting discrimination both in personal relationships and in public realms such as the workplace, according to a new RAND Corporation study. [More]

NAMI unveils unique iPhone and Android app for mental health support

The National Alliance on Mental Illness has unveiled NAMI AIR, a unique iPhone and Android app to provide support and access to information both for persons living with mental health conditions and for family members, friends and other caregivers. [More]
PCMH care model gaining acceptance in primary care, specialist practices

PCMH care model gaining acceptance in primary care, specialist practices

Primary-care physicians play a pivotal role in assuring that patients who require specialized care are transitioned properly from one clinical environment to another to help lower the risks for adverse events and repeat hospitalizations, according to a health quality management expert who spoke today at the National Quality Summit sponsored by the National Association for Healthcare Quality. [More]
Proviso Partners for Health awarded IHI grant to improve community health

Proviso Partners for Health awarded IHI grant to improve community health

The Proviso Partners for Health was awarded a grant from the Institute of Healthcare Improvement to support their efforts to improve community health. Proviso Partners for Health is comprised of Loyola University Health System, Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine and Marcella Niehoff School of Nursing as well as Proviso-Leyden Council for Community Action, Proviso East High School, Triton College, Cook County Department of Public Health and several other community organizations. [More]
Mayo Clinic earns No. 3 spot on 2015 DiversityInc Top 5 Hospitals and Health Systems list

Mayo Clinic earns No. 3 spot on 2015 DiversityInc Top 5 Hospitals and Health Systems list

Mayo Clinic earned No. 3 on the 2015 DiversityInc Top 5 Hospitals and Health Systems list for its continued commitment to diversity and inclusion. This is the fourth year that Mayo has earned a spot on the list. This year's rankings were announced at the annual DiversityInc Top 50 event in New York on April 23. [More]
Looking for standardized approach to testing twilight vision

Looking for standardized approach to testing twilight vision

A simple method of testing "twilight vision" gives reliable results in identifying people who have decreased visual acuity under low light conditions, according to a study in the May issue of Optometry and Vision Science, official journal of the American Academy of Optometry. [More]
Students with standing desks more attentive than seated counterparts, Texas A&M study finds

Students with standing desks more attentive than seated counterparts, Texas A&M study finds

A study from the Texas A&M Health Science Center School of Public Health finds students with standing desks are more attentive than their seated counterparts. In fact, preliminary results show 12 percent greater on-task engagement in classrooms with standing desks, which equates to an extra seven minutes per hour of engaged instruction time. [More]
Study explores innovative approach to identifying successful treatment for HER2+ breast cancer

Study explores innovative approach to identifying successful treatment for HER2+ breast cancer

Ahmad M. Khalil, PhD, knew the odds were against him -- as in thousands upon thousands to one. Yet he and his team never wavered from their quest to identify the parts of the body responsible for revving up one of the most aggressive forms of breast cancer, HER2+. This month in Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, Khalil and his colleagues at Case Western Reserve University proved the power of persistence; from a pool of more than 30,000 possibilities, they found 38 genes and molecules that most likely trigger HER2+ cancer cells to spread. [More]
Text messaging service effective for delivering sexual health information to at-risk teens

Text messaging service effective for delivering sexual health information to at-risk teens

Text messaging that connects teens with sexual health educators is effective for delivering sexual health information, according to a recent study in The Edward R. Murrow College of Communication at Washington State University. The research abstract is online and the work will appear in an upcoming print issue of the journal Health Education and Behavior. [More]
New study shows 'alarming rise' in costs of MS drugs over last 20 years

New study shows 'alarming rise' in costs of MS drugs over last 20 years

A new study shows an "alarming rise" over the last 20 years in the costs of drugs used to slow the progression of multiple sclerosis or reduce the frequency of attacks, according to a study led by researchers at Oregon Health & Science University and Oregon State University. [More]
Research highlights value of serological testing for Coeliac disease in anyone with symptoms

Research highlights value of serological testing for Coeliac disease in anyone with symptoms

Coeliac disease is one of the most common life-long conditions in Europe, yet many people remain undiagnosed and lengthy diagnostic delays may be putting lives at risk. Today, doctors are being urged to consider testing for Coeliac disease in anyone showing signs and symptoms of the condition and to consider screening everyone in high-risk groups. [More]
Loyola's study on simulated stroke earns prestigious 2015 Safety and Quality Award

Loyola's study on simulated stroke earns prestigious 2015 Safety and Quality Award

A study performed by Loyola University Medical Center resident neurologists has won a prestigious 2015 Safety and Quality Award from the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Loyola study reports significant increase in major depression during recent Great Recession

Loyola study reports significant increase in major depression during recent Great Recession

The recent Great Recession was accompanied by a significant and sustained increase in major depression in U.S. adults, according to a Loyola study published in the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry. [More]
Study identifies BLU-554 as potential treatment option for HCC patients

Study identifies BLU-554 as potential treatment option for HCC patients

Findings were presented today at The International Liver CongressTM 2015 on a novel therapeutic candidate for a genomically defined subset of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients with an aberrant fibroblast growth factor receptor 4 (FGFR4) pathway. [More]
Study shows NASH linked to 50% higher death rates compared with NAFLD

Study shows NASH linked to 50% higher death rates compared with NAFLD

Results from a large population-based cohort of almost a million people in the UK found that the chances of dying from non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), over a 14-year period, was approximately 50% higher than for those with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). [More]
Study: Cancer rates in HCV patients significantly increase compared to non-HCV cohort

Study: Cancer rates in HCV patients significantly increase compared to non-HCV cohort

Results announced today at The International Liver Congress 2015 show that cancer rates in patients with the hepatitis C virus (HCV) were significantly increased compared to the non-HCV cohort. The researchers suggest an extrahepatic manifestation of HCV may be an increased risk of cancer. [More]
Study points to TMPRSS2 gene as culprit for aggressive forms of androgen-fuelled cancers

Study points to TMPRSS2 gene as culprit for aggressive forms of androgen-fuelled cancers

A new study led by University of Toronto researcher Dr. David Lam has discovered the trigger behind the most severe forms of cancer pain. Released in top journal Pain this month, the study points to TMPRSS2 as the culprit: a gene that is also responsible for some of the most aggressive forms of androgen-fuelled cancers. [More]
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