Education News and Research RSS Feed - Education News and Research

reprintsWarehouse.com: A responsive platform launched by Springer Healthcare for pharmaceutical professionals

Springer Healthcare is proud to announce the launch of reprintsWarehouse.com – a responsive platform that enables pharmaceutical professionals to rapidly identify content that supports their product or device marketing activities, from a database of over 50,000 clinically relevant medical journals, books, continuing medical education materials and anatomical charts. [More]
American Academy of Ophthalmology redesigns patient education materials to improve literacy standards

American Academy of Ophthalmology redesigns patient education materials to improve literacy standards

Low literacy rates contribute to poor patient compliance, leading to increased hospitalizations and chronic illness and costing the economy between $106 – $238 billion each year. [More]

Rosecrance’s traveling art exhibit helps parents prevent drug addiction in teenagers

Rosecrance, one of the country's leading teen substance abuse treatment centers, has launched a traveling art exhibit to help parents understand teenagers' points of view about pressures they encounter and how they are faced with the potential to use, and abuse, substances. [More]
NICO, Synaptive Medical join forces to integrate innovative technologies for brain surgery

NICO, Synaptive Medical join forces to integrate innovative technologies for brain surgery

Indianapolis interventional medical device maker NICO Corporation and Toronto-based 3D visualization leader Synaptive Medical announced today at the Congress of Neurological Surgeons Annual Meeting that they have joined forces to integrate their innovative technologies for brain surgery. [More]
National nursing organizations collaborate to transform care for patients with serious illness

National nursing organizations collaborate to transform care for patients with serious illness

Three national nursing organizations today announced a collaborative effort to transform the care and culture of serious illness in the United States. [More]
Qualified massage therapist can play key role in improving cardiovascular health

Qualified massage therapist can play key role in improving cardiovascular health

Many already view massage as an important approach to relieving muscle pain or as a means to relax. However, working with a qualified massage therapist can also play a significant role in improving cardiovascular health as evidenced by a growing body of research, according to the American Massage Therapy Association. [More]
Three ways to have a good night's sleep

Three ways to have a good night's sleep

When the clocks "fall back" this year on Nov. 2, don't let gaining an extra hour rob you of needed sleep. [More]
Boston Scientific starts PLATINUM Diversity trial to evaluate Promus PREMIER Stent System

Boston Scientific starts PLATINUM Diversity trial to evaluate Promus PREMIER Stent System

As part of its commitment to innovation and improving patient outcomes, Boston Scientific Corporation has initiated the PLATINUM Diversity trial to evaluate the clinical performance of the Promus PREMIER Everolimus-Eluting Platinum Chromium Coronary Stent System in underserved patient populations, including women and people of color. [More]
Researchers identify genetic variant in Latina women that protects against breast cancer

Researchers identify genetic variant in Latina women that protects against breast cancer

An international research collaboration led by UC San Francisco researchers has identified a genetic variant common in Latina women that protects against breast cancer. [More]
iExaminer smartphone system: A low-cost option for ocular imaging in pediatric patients

iExaminer smartphone system: A low-cost option for ocular imaging in pediatric patients

Smartphone technology is a widely available resource which may also be a portable and effective tool for imaging the inside of the eye, according to results of a study released today at AAO 2014, the 118th annual meeting of the American Academy of Ophthalmology. Researchers from the [More]

New corneal inlay device offers potential treatment option for presbyopia

A thin ring inserted into the eye could soon offer a reading glasses-free remedy for presbyopia, the blurriness in near vision experienced by many people over the age of 40, according to a study released today at AAO 2014, the 118th annual meeting of the American Academy of Ophthalmology. [More]
Depression, anxiety after MI more common in women than men

Depression, anxiety after MI more common in women than men

Women are more likely to develop anxiety and depression after a heart attack (myocardial infarction; MI) than men, according to research presented at Acute Cardiovascular Care 2014 by Professor Pranas Serpytis from Lithuania. [More]
Research findings could provide new insights into esophageal cancer, Barrett's esophagus

Research findings could provide new insights into esophageal cancer, Barrett's esophagus

Despite previous indications to the contrary, the esophagus does have its own pool of stem cells, said researchers from the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine in an animal study published online today in Cell Reports. [More]
Anaesthesia editorial challenges placenta's role in pre-eclampsia

Anaesthesia editorial challenges placenta's role in pre-eclampsia

Pre-eclampsia, the potentially deadly condition that affects pregnant women, may be caused by problems meeting the oxygen demands of the growing fetus, according to an editorial in the November issue of Anaesthesia, the journal of the Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland. [More]
Ebola Virus and Public Health: A special feature by Disaster Medicine and Public Health

Ebola Virus and Public Health: A special feature by Disaster Medicine and Public Health

Accurate knowledge regarding Ebola is critical and pertinent for practicing physicians and clinicians given the current risk of hazardous global outbreak and epidemic. [More]
The Female Athlete Triad: A medical condition in active girls and women

The Female Athlete Triad: A medical condition in active girls and women

Sophie is a 15 year old cross country runner who has a history of a foot stress fracture and shin splints. Often she does not eat prior to her workouts. [More]
Genome Canada awards $6M grant to CAMH and Assurex Health

Genome Canada awards $6M grant to CAMH and Assurex Health

Assurex Health and Canada's Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) today announced they have received a $6 million grant from Genome Canada, an agency of the Canadian government, to study the benefits of genetic testing to guide medication decisions for patients with depression or schizophrenia. [More]
Viewpoints: Abortion and birth control issues in N.C. Senate race; replacing Obamacare; cancellations

Viewpoints: Abortion and birth control issues in N.C. Senate race; replacing Obamacare; cancellations

But on Wednesday in Charlotte, Kay Hagan stood without hesitation next to Janet Colm, chief executive of the Planned Parenthood Action Fund of Central North Carolina, and proudly bashed her opponent, Thom Tillis, for reducing women's rights on abortion and birth control. [More]
First-ever evidence-based guidelines released for prevention of acute COPD exacerbations

First-ever evidence-based guidelines released for prevention of acute COPD exacerbations

The American College of Chest Physicians (CHEST) and the Canadian Thoracic Society (CTS) announced today the release of Prevention of Acute Exacerbation of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: American College of Chest Physicians and Canadian Thoracic Society Guideline in the journal CHEST. [More]
Researchers find poor access to outpatient psychiatric care in Boston, Chicago, Houston metro areas

Researchers find poor access to outpatient psychiatric care in Boston, Chicago, Houston metro areas

Obtaining access to private outpatient psychiatric care in the Boston, Chicago and Houston metropolitan areas is difficult, even for those with private insurance or those willing to pay out of pocket, a new study by Harvard researchers shows. [More]