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Using corticosteroids before late preterm delivery reduces respiratory complications in babies

Using corticosteroids before late preterm delivery reduces respiratory complications in babies

A multicenter clinical trial led by researchers at Columbia University Medical Center and NewYork-Presbyterian has found that the use of corticosteroids in mothers at risk for late preterm delivery significantly reduced the incidence of severe respiratory complications in their babies. [More]
Study examines links between spending on social services and AIDS deaths in U.S.

Study examines links between spending on social services and AIDS deaths in U.S.

Despite considerable advances in the prevention and treatment of HIV/AIDS over the past 30 years, HIV infection rates have remained stagnant in the United States for the past decade. A study by researchers at the Yale Global Health Leadership Institute examines links between spending on social services and public health and AIDS deaths in the United States. [More]
Return to Practice in Diagnostic Radiography course at Derby first to be approved in UK

Return to Practice in Diagnostic Radiography course at Derby first to be approved in UK

A new course designed to get radiographers who have taken a career break to return to practice has been launched at the University of Derby. [More]
One million serious medical complications could be avoided with improvements in blood glucose levels in diabetics

One million serious medical complications could be avoided with improvements in blood glucose levels in diabetics

Sanofi, Diabetes UK and JDRF today announce the publication of IMPACT 2 in the journal Diabetic Medicine. This new study shows that, if sustained, even modest improvement in blood glucose levels can provide significantly improved outcomes for the 3.5 million people diagnosed with diabetes in the UK. [More]
BDNF gene expression signals cognitive reserve against AD progression

BDNF gene expression signals cognitive reserve against AD progression

Brain-derived neurotrophic factor gene expression contributes to slowing of cognitive decline in older adults and may protect against the effects of Alzheimer’s disease pathology, researchers report in Neurology. [More]
Study finding could shed light on molecular mechanisms underlying Huntington's disease

Study finding could shed light on molecular mechanisms underlying Huntington's disease

Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine have shown that the core of the protein clumps found in the brains of people with Huntington's disease have a distinctive structure, a finding that could shed light on the molecular mechanisms underlying the neurodegenerative disorder. [More]
Elder financial exploitation resulting from age-related cognitive decline pose major economic threats

Elder financial exploitation resulting from age-related cognitive decline pose major economic threats

Protecting the wealth of older adults should be a high priority for banks, insurance companies, and others, according to the latest edition of Public Policy & Aging Report (PP&AR). Elder financial exploitation and diminished financial capacity resulting from age-related cognitive impairments both pose major economic threats, the issue finds. [More]
High school wrestlers have highest number of skin infections

High school wrestlers have highest number of skin infections

The first national survey of skin infections among high school athletes has found that wrestlers have the highest number of infections, with football players coming in a distant second, according to researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus. [More]
CMU joins $12 million research project to reverse-engineer the brain's secret algorithms

CMU joins $12 million research project to reverse-engineer the brain's secret algorithms

Carnegie Mellon University is embarking on a five-year, $12 million research effort to reverse-engineer the brain, seeking to unlock the secrets of neural circuitry and the brain's learning methods. Researchers will use these insights to make computers think more like humans. [More]
Texting could promote medication adherence among chronically ill patients

Texting could promote medication adherence among chronically ill patients

Text messages can double the odds of medication adherence in patients with chronic disease. That is the central finding of a new study published today in JAMA Internal Medicine. [More]
NJHF awards 30 grants for NJ researchers working on health-related research

NJHF awards 30 grants for NJ researchers working on health-related research

New Jersey Health Foundation has awarded 30 grants totaling more than $1 million for researchers in New Jersey who are working on health-related research that demonstrates exciting potential. [More]
Study reveals fetal origin for social and repetitive behavior deficits

Study reveals fetal origin for social and repetitive behavior deficits

Fetal development has been known to play an important role in social interaction, a fundamental behavior found in nearly all organisms, and later adult social behaviors. Autism, a highly heritable neurodevelopment disorder that causes difficulties with social interactions, has been postulated to be caused by neuron overgrowth in the prenatal period, although the precise timing and cause of this overgrowth has been unknown. [More]
Pullman Regional Hospital implements new incident management and patient safety system

Pullman Regional Hospital implements new incident management and patient safety system

Pullman Regional Hospital and RGP Healthcare, a division of Resources Global Professionals, today jointly announced that Pullman Regional is implementing Pavisse™, a new, state-of-the-art incident management and patient safety system. [More]
Innovative mattresses to stop pressure ulcers: an interview with Mike Hutson

Innovative mattresses to stop pressure ulcers: an interview with Mike Hutson

Pressure ulcers are wounds that occur when a continuous pressure or friction is placed on one area of the body, damaging the skin. They occur when pressure stops blood from flowing normally, leading the cells to die and the skin to break down. [More]
Seafood consumption may benefit older adults at risk for Alzheimer's disease

Seafood consumption may benefit older adults at risk for Alzheimer's disease

New research published Feb. 2 in the Journal of the American Medical Association found that older adults with a major risk gene for Alzheimer's disease known as APOE?4 who ate at least one seafood serving per week showed fewer signs of Alzheimer's-related brain changes. In contrast, this association was not found in the brains of volunteers who ate fish weekly but did not carry the risk gene. [More]

Flexible duty hours safe for patients and beneficial for surgical residents

A new landmark national study led by Northwestern Medicine showed allowing surgical residents the flexibility to work longer hours in order to stay with their patients through the end of an operation or stabilize them during a critical event did not pose a greater risk to patients. [More]
New study finds steep decline in basic science publications

New study finds steep decline in basic science publications

A new study has found a steep decline in the number of scholarly papers about basic science published in leading medical journals in the last 20 years. [More]
UAB research explores neurofibromatosis type 1

UAB research explores neurofibromatosis type 1

It is easy to tell a medical research story that has a simple and dramatic moment. But disease is often much more complex, and the work to understand it can be painstaking. A vivid example of that is seen in the University of Alabama at Birmingham Medical Genomics Laboratory, headed by Ludwine Messiaen, Ph.D., professor of genetics. This lab offers clinical genetic testing for a broad array of common and rare genetic disorders. [More]
New drug cocktail may show promise in NSCLC patients

New drug cocktail may show promise in NSCLC patients

A drug approved by the Food and Drug Administration for melanoma in combination with a common cholesterol-lowering drug may show promise in controlling cancer growth in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), according to new research from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. [More]
Parents need to take active role in oral health of children

Parents need to take active role in oral health of children

February is National Children's Dental Health Month, an opportunity for parents of toddlers, young children or teenagers to explore questions about keeping your child's teeth clean, your child's first dental visit or how to protect children's smiles. [More]
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