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National Science Foundation announces recipient of Faculty Early Career Development Award

National Science Foundation announces recipient of Faculty Early Career Development Award

The National Science Foundation announced that New York University Assistant Professor Riccardo Lattanzi is a recipient of the Faculty Early Career Development Award, more widely known as a CAREER Award. [More]
IV cosyntropin therapy matches EBP in relieving pain from post-dural puncture headache

IV cosyntropin therapy matches EBP in relieving pain from post-dural puncture headache

Intravenous (IV) cosyntropin therapy was equivalent to epidural blood patch (EBP) in relieving pain from post-dural puncture headache (PDPH) with potential for fewer complications and lower costs, data from a randomized, controlled trial showed. [More]
Qualcomm Life, AMC Health to accelerate transformation of health care delivery for at-risk patients

Qualcomm Life, AMC Health to accelerate transformation of health care delivery for at-risk patients

Qualcomm Life, Inc., a subsidiary of Qualcomm Incorporated, and AMC Health, a privately held provider of 'real-time' patient management solutions, today announced a collaborative effort to accelerate the transformation of chronic care and population health management by significantly enhancing connectivity and care coordination for at-risk patients, specifically those with heart failure, hypertension, diabetes, asthma or COPD, in a cost-effective manner. [More]
DCR representatives to present health-related quality posters at NKF's 2015 Spring Clinical Meeting

DCR representatives to present health-related quality posters at NKF's 2015 Spring Clinical Meeting

DaVita Clinical Research, a specialty contract research organization with services spanning the full spectrum of drug and device development and subsidiary of DaVita HealthCare Partners Inc., today announced that company representatives will present health-related quality posters at National Kidney Foundation's 2015 Spring Clinical Meeting, which takes place March 25-29, 2015 in Dallas. [More]
Women who give birth to four or more children at risk of heart disease

Women who give birth to four or more children at risk of heart disease

Women who give birth to four or more children are more likely to have cardiovascular changes that can be early indicators of heart disease than women who have fewer children, new research by UT Southwestern Medical Center cardiologists finds. [More]
Study: Early improvements not sustained in patients treated with PRP injection for facet joint arthropathy

Study: Early improvements not sustained in patients treated with PRP injection for facet joint arthropathy

Early gains in pain relief, behavioral markers and function were not sustained in patients treated with platelet-rich plasma (PRP) injection for facet joint arthropathy, new research shows. Results were available at the 31st Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Pain Medicine. [More]
Markovian models show promise for describing postoperative pain trajectories

Markovian models show promise for describing postoperative pain trajectories

Markovian models show promise for describing postoperative pain states and, eventually, may help guide clinical decisions, a new study found. [More]
Mesenchymal stem cell transplantation reduces opioid tolerance, opioid-induced pain

Mesenchymal stem cell transplantation reduces opioid tolerance, opioid-induced pain

Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) transplantation reduced opioid tolerance and opioid-induced hyperalgesia caused by daily morphine injections in rats, according to new research. [More]
Sympathetic nerve block shows no major benefit for PTSD in randomized controlled trial

Sympathetic nerve block shows no major benefit for PTSD in randomized controlled trial

A sympathetic nerve block that has shown promise for treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) performed no better than sham treatment in a randomized controlled trial, new research shows. [More]
CMV-based vaccine provides long-lasting protective immunity against Ebola virus

CMV-based vaccine provides long-lasting protective immunity against Ebola virus

A cytomegalovirus (CMV)-based vaccine provides long-lasting protective immunity against Ebola virus, and has potential for development as a disseminating vaccine strategy to prevent ebolavirus infection of wild African ape populations. [More]
DNA samples collected from tampons may help detect endometrial cancer

DNA samples collected from tampons may help detect endometrial cancer

Researchers at Mayo Clinic have shown that it is possible to detect endometrial cancer using tumor DNA picked up by ordinary tampons. The new approach specifically examines DNA samples from vaginal secretions for the presence of chemical "off" switches — known as methylation — that can disable genes that normally keep cancer in check. [More]
Mayo Clinic Center for Tuberculosis introduces new medical journal

Mayo Clinic Center for Tuberculosis introduces new medical journal

The Mayo Clinic Center for Tuberculosis, a regional training and consultation center at Mayo Clinic's campus in Rochester, Minn, is today launching a new medical journal, the Journal of Clinical Tuberculosis and Other Mycobacterial Diseases. [More]
Study: 53% of parents/caregivers of youth baseball pitchers unaware of safe pitching practices

Study: 53% of parents/caregivers of youth baseball pitchers unaware of safe pitching practices

A new study presented today at the 2015 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) found that 53 percent of the parents/caregivers of youth baseball pitchers are unaware of safe pitching practices designed to prevent overuse injuries—common tears or damage, most often to the elbow (ulnar collateral ligament) or shoulder—which can cause pain, lost play time and, if not treated appropriately, arthritis, deformity and disability. [More]
2015 Minds Matter event raises funds to support brain tumor research

2015 Minds Matter event raises funds to support brain tumor research

One day in 2009, Maria Nijim's father got behind the wheel of his car and realized he couldn't see out of one eye. An MRI showed a tumor and then surgery confirmed a devastating diagnosis – glioblastoma – the most aggressive type of brain tumor. [More]
Non-invasive imaging tests may predict healthy adults' future risk of heart attack, stroke or death

Non-invasive imaging tests may predict healthy adults' future risk of heart attack, stroke or death

Adding two non-invasive imaging tests to traditional cardiovascular disease risk factor assessment more precisely predicts a healthy patient's future risk of heart attack, stroke, or premature death, according to a study led by Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published in the March 24 edition of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. [More]
Broad Institute of MIT researcher honored for groundbreaking research using new gene editing tool

Broad Institute of MIT researcher honored for groundbreaking research using new gene editing tool

The newest gene editing tool - called CRISPR-Cas9 - is leading to new research possibilities in cell biology and neuroscience. This includes the ability to make transgenic animal models more quickly, which helps researchers better study diseases that affect thousands of people each year. [More]
ISSM selects Elsevier to publish three prestigious journals

ISSM selects Elsevier to publish three prestigious journals

Elsevier, a world-leading provider of scientific, technical and medical information products and services, has announced that it has been selected by the International Society for Sexual Medicine (ISSM) to publish its flagship journal, The Journal of Sexual Medicine, as well as Sexual Medicine Reviews and open access journal Sexual Medicine, as of January 2016. [More]
Patients with carpal tunnel syndrome twice as likely to have migraine headaches, shows study

Patients with carpal tunnel syndrome twice as likely to have migraine headaches, shows study

Patients with carpal tunnel syndrome are more than twice as likely to have migraine headaches, reports a study in Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery--Global Open, the official open-access medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS). [More]
Newly discovered bodily process may explain fetal brain bleeds

Newly discovered bodily process may explain fetal brain bleeds

A newly discovered bodily process in mice may explain why some human fetuses who have different antigens than their mothers suffer life-threatening brain bleeds, according to a new study. [More]

People who take many doses are more likely to crush tablets, reduce their effectiveness

People who take more than four doses of medicine a day appear more likely to crush tablets or open capsules potentially reducing their effectiveness, QUT research has found. [More]
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