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South Asians living in the U.S. more reluctant to seek medications for treating pain

South Asians living in the U.S. more reluctant to seek medications for treating pain

When compared with other ethnicities, Asians are the most unsatisfied with the health care they received in the United States, previous research has shown. This dissatisfaction with health care partly is caused by health practices in the U.S. clashing with the practices Asian patients and families may be more used to experiencing overseas. [More]
Regular exercise, healthy diet may help reduce knee pain for overweight adults with diabetes

Regular exercise, healthy diet may help reduce knee pain for overweight adults with diabetes

Knee pain in older adults, often caused by osteoarthritis, usually means more visits to the doctor and also can be a harbinger of disability. [More]
New Penn study finds link between graduate medical training and brand name statin prescribing

New Penn study finds link between graduate medical training and brand name statin prescribing

Physicians in training are twice as likely to order a costly brand-name statin (used to lower blood cholesterol levels) when supervised by senior physicians who prefer those medications in their own practice, according to a new study led by researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and published online in the Journal of General Internal Medicine. [More]
Endocrine Society selects 18 endocrinologists as winners of 2016 Laureate Awards

Endocrine Society selects 18 endocrinologists as winners of 2016 Laureate Awards

The Endocrine Society today announced it has chosen 18 accomplished endocrinologists as winners of the organization's prestigious 2016 Laureate Awards. [More]
Methodist Healthcare, Mayo Clinic collaborate to better serve patients and their families

Methodist Healthcare, Mayo Clinic collaborate to better serve patients and their families

Methodist Healthcare and Mayo Clinic announced today that Methodist has joined the Mayo Clinic Care Network, a national network of health care providers committed to better serving patients and their families through collaboration. [More]
Mayo Clinic researchers study HDAC inhibitors to find effective treatments for anaplastic thyroid cancer

Mayo Clinic researchers study HDAC inhibitors to find effective treatments for anaplastic thyroid cancer

In their bid to find the best combination of therapies to treat anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC), researchers on Mayo Clinic's Florida campus demonstrated that all histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are not created equal. [More]
Mana Health's software ManaPortal obtains ONC HIT 2014 Edition Modular EHR certification

Mana Health's software ManaPortal obtains ONC HIT 2014 Edition Modular EHR certification

Mana Health's ManaPortal version 1.0.0, has achieved ONC HIT 2014 Edition Modular EHR certification, which designates that the software is capable of supporting eligible providers and hospitals with meeting the Stage 1 and Stage 2 Meaningful Use measures required to qualify for funding under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. [More]
Study looks at impact of amyloid imaging on diagnosis, management of patients with cognitive impairment

Study looks at impact of amyloid imaging on diagnosis, management of patients with cognitive impairment

Eli Lilly and Company and Avid Radiopharmaceuticals, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Lilly, today announced new data showing that knowledge of amyloid status as determined by Florbetapir F 18 Injection imaging altered diagnosis and management in the majority of patients being studied. [More]
Study points to potential treatment for thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura

Study points to potential treatment for thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura

A rare autoimmune disease creates sudden pain in the abdomen or the head, sending a patient to the emergency room with a potentially fatal condition. The pain comes from a multitude of blockages of tiny blood vessels, formed after the patient's own immune system somehow inhibits an enzyme that is vital to control clotting. [More]
Smoke-free policy can improve living environment for apartment dwellers

Smoke-free policy can improve living environment for apartment dwellers

Adopting a smoke-free policy can improve the living environment for apartment dwellers while reducing maintenance costs, according to a survey of multiunit housing owners and operators. [More]
Mercy Medical Center named third best hospital in Maryland

Mercy Medical Center named third best hospital in Maryland

U.S. News & World Report has released its annual "Best Hospital" rankings. This 26th annual edition includes information on nearly 5,000 hospitals nationwide. U.S. News & World Report named Mercy Medical Center in Baltimore as the third best hospital in Maryland, behind only the academic medical centers at Johns Hopkins and the University of Maryland. Mercy also retained its status from last year as the state's top-ranked community hospital. [More]

Mission statements of medical schools influence outcomes among graduate students

Medical schools whose mission statements underscore societal good and a desire to train students for service to at-risk populations are more likely to produce physicians who will enter careers in primary care (such as family medicine) and work in medically underserved areas, according to a study by Upstate Medical University researchers published in the June issue of the journal Family Medicine. [More]
Smokers who switch to low-nicotine cigarettes find difficult to curb smoking habits in the long term

Smokers who switch to low-nicotine cigarettes find difficult to curb smoking habits in the long term

Smokers who successfully lowered their nicotine intake when they were switched to low-nicotine cigarettes were unable to curb their smoking habits in the long term, according to a study by researchers at UCSF and San Francisco General Hospital and Trauma Center. [More]
New assessment tool helps identify children and adolescents with bereavement disorder

New assessment tool helps identify children and adolescents with bereavement disorder

Everybody grieves the death of a loved one, and the process helps most mourners adjust to their loss. "Charlie Brown was right," said Christopher Layne, a psychologist and researcher at the Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior at UCLA. "There is good grief." But for some people, bereavement becomes a problem in itself, prolonging suffering and impairing functioning. For grieving children and adolescents persistent complex bereavement disorder can derail social and academic development at a time when children and adolescents need to master skills and form aspirations to succeed later in life. [More]
Experts draft prescription for making cancer drugs more affordable

Experts draft prescription for making cancer drugs more affordable

A group of 118 of the nation's leading cancer experts have drafted a prescription for reducing the high cost of cancer drugs and voiced support for a patient-based grassroots movement demanding action on the issue. Their recommendations and support are outlined in a commentary, co-authored by the group, in the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings. [More]
SAGE announces launch of open access journal: Educational Neuroscience

SAGE announces launch of open access journal: Educational Neuroscience

SAGE today announces the launch of Educational Neuroscience (EdN), an open access journal that explores developing brain-behavior relationships and their implications for the science of learning, academic skill acquisition, and education practice at multiple levels of the educational systems from early childhood to higher education. [More]
Researchers develop dynamic smart drug that targets site-specific inflammation

Researchers develop dynamic smart drug that targets site-specific inflammation

Ben-Gurion University of the Negev and University of Colorado researchers have developed a dynamic "smart" drug that targets inflammation in a site-specific manner and could enhance the body's natural ability to fight infection and reduce side effects. [More]
New survey explores US women's sexual risk-taking as tourists

New survey explores US women's sexual risk-taking as tourists

Relaxing beach vacations are perfect for sexual experimentation with a steady partner, while group tours and sightseeing trips are the ultimate contexts for casual sex with acquaintances or strangers, women said in a new survey. [More]
Zinc coating of galvanized steel pipes can be long-term source of lead in water

Zinc coating of galvanized steel pipes can be long-term source of lead in water

When unsafe levels of lead are found in drinking water, the culprit has typically been lead pipes or lead-containing brass and bronze fittings, but in a new study researchers clearly show that lead present in the zinc coating of galvanized steel pipes can be a very significant long-term source of lead in water. [More]

Direct Relief honored with Esri's Special Achievement in GIS Award

Direct Relief was honored by Esri today with a Special Achievement in GIS Award for its role in developing map applications for the One-Million Community Health Workers campaign (1mCHW), a joint initiative of the Sustainable Development Solutions Network and the Earth Institute at Columbia University. [More]
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