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Brain inflammation linked to clinical depression

Brain inflammation linked to clinical depression

A new study by the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health found that the measure of brain inflammation in people who were experiencing clinical depression was increased by 30 per cent. The findings, published today in JAMA Psychiatry, have important implications for developing new treatments for depression. [More]
ICU patients using ventilators could benefit from assistive communication tools

ICU patients using ventilators could benefit from assistive communication tools

A new study reveals that more than half of patients in intensive care units (ICU) using ventilators to help them breathe could benefit from assistive communication tools. [More]
TGH develops unique new method to help high-risk patients receive a lung transplant

TGH develops unique new method to help high-risk patients receive a lung transplant

A unique new method to treat a specific group of patients who are at greater risk of rejecting a donor lung, allowing them to live longer after transplant without rejection, has been developed by the Toronto Lung Transplant Program at Toronto General Hospital, University Health Network. [More]
HCI researchers find cell mechanism that may trigger pancreatic cancer

HCI researchers find cell mechanism that may trigger pancreatic cancer

Researchers at Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah have found that defects in how cells are squeezed out of overcrowded tissue to die, a process called extrusion, may be a mechanism by which pancreatic cancer begins. From these findings, they may have identified an effective way to reverse the defective extrusion's effects without destroying normal tissues nearby. [More]
Infants show consistent patterns of brain activity in response to painful vaccinations

Infants show consistent patterns of brain activity in response to painful vaccinations

Infants show distinct, consistent patterns of brain activity in response to painful vaccinations, reports a study in the February issue of PAIN, the official publication of the International Association for the Study of Pain. [More]
Study finds that African-American people with colon cancer have lower survival rates

Study finds that African-American people with colon cancer have lower survival rates

African-American people diagnosed with colon cancer have consistently lower survival rates compared with white patients, despite a nationwide decline in colon cancer deaths overall. [More]
Androgen receptor in prostate cancer cells can activate different gene set when bound to antiandrogens

Androgen receptor in prostate cancer cells can activate different gene set when bound to antiandrogens

The androgen receptor in prostate cancer cells can activate different sets of genes depending on whether it binds with an androgen hormone or an antiandrogen drug, according to a new study led by researchers at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute. [More]
New survey finds long-term benefits of brain surgery in patients with epilepsy

New survey finds long-term benefits of brain surgery in patients with epilepsy

Brain surgery for otherwise hard-to-treat epilepsy is effective for up to 15 years, according to a new survey by Henry Ford Hospital physicians. [More]
Kaleo, CHMI partner to reduce prescription drug-related deaths

Kaleo, CHMI partner to reduce prescription drug-related deaths

Kaleo, a privately-held pharmaceutical company, today announced a national strategic partnership with the Clinton Health Matters Initiative, an initiative of the Clinton Foundation, that will help support its goal of cutting prescription drug-related deaths in half, saving approximately 10,000 lives over five years. [More]
Raiing Medical, Boston Children's Hospital sign license agreement for Thermia education platform

Raiing Medical, Boston Children's Hospital sign license agreement for Thermia education platform

Raiing Medical Inc. and Boston Children's Hospital entered a license agreement for Boston Children's Thermia education platform, designed to assist parents in learning more about fever, illness and fever management. The online educational framework will be integrated with Raiing's iThermonitor device, a wearable thermometer with US FDA 510(k) clearance. [More]
Penn scientists explore potential therapeutic target for cerebral cavernous malformations

Penn scientists explore potential therapeutic target for cerebral cavernous malformations

Tens of millions of people around the world have abnormal, leak-prone sproutings of blood vessels in the brain called cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs). These abnormal growths can lead to seizures, strokes, hemorrhages, and other serious conditions, yet their precise molecular cause has never been determined. [More]
Mayo Clinic study compares new breast cancer risk prediction model with current model

Mayo Clinic study compares new breast cancer risk prediction model with current model

A new breast cancer risk prediction model combining histologic features of biopsied breast tissue from women with benign breast disease and individual patient demographic information more accurately classified breast cancer risk than the current screening standard. [More]
Study shows differences in play behavior, brain activation patterns and stress levels in autistic children

Study shows differences in play behavior, brain activation patterns and stress levels in autistic children

Brain scans confirm significant differences in play behavior, brain activation patterns and stress levels in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) as compared with typically developing children. [More]
Majority of Canada's homeless adults with mental illness show evidence of cognitive deficits

Majority of Canada's homeless adults with mental illness show evidence of cognitive deficits

Nearly three-quarters of homeless adults with mental illness in Canada show evidence of cognitive deficits, such as difficulties with problem solving, learning and memory, new research has found. [More]
University of Colorado, Mile High Ophthalmics sign licensing agreement for new cataract surgery device

University of Colorado, Mile High Ophthalmics sign licensing agreement for new cataract surgery device

A new device designed to perform safer, more effective cataract surgery is going on the market following a licensing agreement between the University of Colorado and Mile High Ophthalmics LLC. [More]
Upregulating heme-oxygenase with hemin helps improve pericardial adipocyte morphology, function

Upregulating heme-oxygenase with hemin helps improve pericardial adipocyte morphology, function

Scientists at the University of Saskatchewan College of Medicine, Department of Physiology, Saskatoon, Canada, led by Dr. Joseph Fomusi Ndisang have determined that upregulating heme-oxygenase with hemin improves pericardial adipocyte morphology and function. [More]
Study explores economic outcomes of hospital-based violence intervention

Study explores economic outcomes of hospital-based violence intervention

At more than 25 hospitals across the U.S., health care professionals have embraced a public health approach to their work--taking action to prevent violent injuries, not just treat them. In programs known as hospital-based violence intervention programs (HVIPs), teams of medical professionals, social workers and researchers step in at a critical moment in a patient's life--the period following a violent injury such as a gunshot or stab wound--with case management, counseling and other services that help these victims break free from the cycle of violence. [More]
Household rules, regular sleep-wake routines improve sleep in children

Household rules, regular sleep-wake routines improve sleep in children

Children obtain better and more age-appropriate sleep in the presence of household rules and regular sleep-wake routines, according to sleep researchers. [More]
Morphine after tonsillectomy may be life threatening for children

Morphine after tonsillectomy may be life threatening for children

Treating post-operative pain with morphine can cause life-threatening respiratory problems in some children who have had their tonsils and/or adenoids removed, new research has found. [More]
Alcohol drinking pattern influences risk of cirrhosis

Alcohol drinking pattern influences risk of cirrhosis

Approximately 170,000 people die from alcoholic cirrhosis of the liver in Europe every year. Although alcohol is the most important risk factor, less is known about the significance of different patterns of drinking. Currently scientists believe that cirrhosis is a function of the volume of alcohol consumed irrespective of patterns of drinking. Investigators have now established that alcohol drinking pattern has a significant influence on the risk of cirrhosis and that daily drinking increases that risk compared with drinking less frequently. [More]