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Study shows that abuse of anti-anxiety, sleep drugs becomes a growing issue among teens

Study shows that abuse of anti-anxiety, sleep drugs becomes a growing issue among teens

The medical community may be inadvertently creating a new generation of illegal, recreational drug users by prescribing anti-anxiety or sleep medications to teenagers, say University of Michigan researchers. [More]
Two UH scientists named as fellows of AAAS

Two UH scientists named as fellows of AAAS

Two scientists from the University of Houston have been elected as fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. [More]
New, enhanced MRI identifies brain injury in BBB of football players following mild concussions

New, enhanced MRI identifies brain injury in BBB of football players following mild concussions

A new, enhanced MRI diagnostic approach was, for the first time, able to identify significant damage to the blood-brain barrier (BBB) of professional football players following "unreported" trauma or mild concussions. Published in the current issue of JAMA Neurology, this study could improve decision making on when an athlete should "return to play." [More]
Raising awareness of sickle cell disease risks

Raising awareness of sickle cell disease risks

Members of the public in sub-Saharan Africa who are carriers of the hereditary disease sickle cell disease must be educated aggressively through public health campaigns to raise awareness of the risks of parenting offspring with the disease if their partner is also a carrier, according to research published in the International Journal of Medical Engineering and Informatics. [More]
Five USF faculty members named AAAS Fellow

Five USF faculty members named AAAS Fellow

Five faculty members from the University of South Florida in Tampa have been named Fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Election as an AAAS Fellow is an honor bestowed upon AAAS members by their peers. [More]
Abnormal connections between neurons cause motor coordination issues in autism

Abnormal connections between neurons cause motor coordination issues in autism

Abnormal connections between neurons are the likely cause of motor coordination issues seen in autism spectrum disorder. Using a mouse model of autism, scientists from the University of Chicago identified a malfunctioning neural circuit associated with reduced capacity for motor learning. This appears to arise from an inability to eliminate unneeded neural connections in the brain. [More]
NUS researchers make breakthrough discovery that could lead to future treatment for multiple sclerosis

NUS researchers make breakthrough discovery that could lead to future treatment for multiple sclerosis

A multi-disciplinary research team from the National University of Singapore has made a breakthrough discovery of a new type of immune cells that may help in the development of a future treatment for multiple sclerosis (MS). [More]
Study identifies H3.3 protein as key regulator in cellular senescence

Study identifies H3.3 protein as key regulator in cellular senescence

Changes to the structure of the protein histone H3.3 may play a key role in silencing genes that regulate cancer cell growth, according to a study led by researchers from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published online this month in the journal Nature Communications. [More]
20th annual edition of NCCN Guidelines for Prostate Cancer published

20th annual edition of NCCN Guidelines for Prostate Cancer published

The National Comprehensive Cancer Network has published the 20th annual edition of the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines) for Prostate Cancer—one of the eight original NCCN Guidelines published in November 1996. [More]

Twenty-seven young researchers receive SNSF Starting Grant

Twenty-seven outstanding young researchers have received an SNSF Starting Grant. The funding level, duration and funding conditions are in line with those of the European Research Council (ERC). This transitional measure of the Swiss National Science Foundation (SNSF) offered the Swiss research community an adequate substitute for ERC grants. [More]
Next-generation biomarker detects tumour cells, delivers anti-cancer drugs

Next-generation biomarker detects tumour cells, delivers anti-cancer drugs

Nanyang Technological University in Singapore has invented a unique biomarker with two exceptional functions. [More]
First issue of GSA's new publication series explores pain as public health problem

First issue of GSA's new publication series explores pain as public health problem

The first issue of a new publication series from The Gerontological Society of America called From Policy to Practice explores pain as a public health problem and takes a look at how various policies impact the care provided to patients in a range of practice settings. [More]
Kristjan T. Ragnarsson receives Frank H. Krusen, MD, Lifetime Achievement Award

Kristjan T. Ragnarsson receives Frank H. Krusen, MD, Lifetime Achievement Award

Kristjan T. Ragnarsson, MD, the Lucy G. Moses Professor and Chairman of the Department of Rehabilitation Medicine for the Mount Sinai Health System received the Frank H. Krusen, MD, Lifetime Achievement Award from the American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation during a ceremony which took place on Saturday, November 15, in San Diego, California. [More]
University of Vermont Medical Center recognized with 2014 Partnership in Prevention Award

University of Vermont Medical Center recognized with 2014 Partnership in Prevention Award

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, and the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America today recognized the University of Vermont Medical Center with the 2014 Partnership in Prevention Award for achieving sustainable improvements toward eliminating healthcare-associated infections (HAIs). [More]
Study provides estimates of obesity-attributable costs of absenteeism among U.S. workers

Study provides estimates of obesity-attributable costs of absenteeism among U.S. workers

A study conducted by researchers at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health shows that obesity costs the U.S. $8.65 billion per year as a result of absenteeism in the workplace --more than 9% of all absenteeism costs. [More]
Actions needed to prevent violence against women and girls

Actions needed to prevent violence against women and girls

Current efforts to prevent violence against women and girls are inadequate, according to a new Series published in The Lancet. Estimates suggest that globally, 1 in 3 women has experienced either physical or sexual violence from their partner, and that 7% of women will experience sexual assault by a non-partner at some point in their lives. [More]
CHOP recognized as 2014 LGBT Healthcare Equality Leader

CHOP recognized as 2014 LGBT Healthcare Equality Leader

The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia has been recognized as a 2014 LGBT Healthcare Equality Leader by the Human Rights Campaign Foundation, the educational arm of the country's largest lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) civil rights organization. [More]
Early support and education program has positive impact on people with rheumatoid arthritis

Early support and education program has positive impact on people with rheumatoid arthritis

A study at Hospital for Special Surgery finds that a support group addressing the psychological and educational needs of people recently diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has a strong positive impact on their lives. [More]
Exposure to peanut proteins in household dust may trigger peanut allergy

Exposure to peanut proteins in household dust may trigger peanut allergy

Exposure to peanut proteins in household dust may be a trigger of peanut allergy, according to a study published today in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. [More]
Digoxin drug associated with higher risk of death, hospitalization among adults with atrial fibrillation

Digoxin drug associated with higher risk of death, hospitalization among adults with atrial fibrillation

Digoxin, a drug commonly used to treat heart conditions, was associated with a 71 percent higher risk of death and a 63 percent higher risk of hospitalization among adults with diagnosed atrial fibrillation and no evidence of heart failure, according to a Kaiser Permanente study that appears in the current online issue of Circulation: Arrhythmia and Electrophysiology. [More]