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Getinge secures EUR 160 million loan from EIB for development of new medical devices

Getinge secures EUR 160 million loan from EIB for development of new medical devices

The European Investment Bank has provided a EUR 160 million loan to Getinge AB, a global medical technology company, for its research and development in the areas of surgery, intensive care, infection control, care ergonomics and wound care. Getinge’s research addresses unmet medical needs and targets the development of new devices with higher efficiency and safety for increased positive outcomes for both caregivers and patients. [More]
Children exposed to adverse childhood experience more likely to develop asthma

Children exposed to adverse childhood experience more likely to develop asthma

Robyn Wing, M.D., an emergency medicine physician at Hasbro Children's Hospital, recently led a study that found children who were exposed to an adverse childhood experience (ACE) were 28 percent more likely to develop asthma. [More]
Gulf Coast residents continue to struggle with the aftermath of Deepwater Horizon oil spill

Gulf Coast residents continue to struggle with the aftermath of Deepwater Horizon oil spill

Five years ago, on April 20, 2010, the BP Deepwater Horizon oil platform exploded; over the next five months, more than 206 million gallons of oil gushed into the Gulf of Mexico, affecting more than 950 miles of shoreline. [More]
UC San Diego, Scripps partner to improve patient care, physician training and research in hospice medicine

UC San Diego, Scripps partner to improve patient care, physician training and research in hospice medicine

UC San Diego Health System and Scripps Health are partnering to provide improved continuity of patient care, fellowship training and research in hospice and palliative medicine. Under a new five-year agreement, Scripps will work with UC San Diego to provide outpatient and inpatient hospice care for UC San Diego patients, allowing UC San Diego physicians to better coordinate post-acute care for patients with chronic illness. [More]
New UM SOM study uncovers never-before-seen illness transmitted by ticks

New UM SOM study uncovers never-before-seen illness transmitted by ticks

Tick-borne diseases are a major public health problem around the world. Ticks carry and transmit a variety of microbes that cause disease. These illnesses, which include Lyme disease, Rocky Mountain spotted fever, and Tularemia, can cause a variety of symptoms, often serious and sometimes deadly. [More]
Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan, UMHS collaborate to improve quality of care for Michiganians

Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan, UMHS collaborate to improve quality of care for Michiganians

Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan and the University of Michigan Health System will collaborate with emergency physicians at participating hospitals across the state to develop best practices to improve the experience and outcomes of patients receiving care in emergency departments. [More]
Study opens door to new treatment for hard-to-treat asthmatic children

Study opens door to new treatment for hard-to-treat asthmatic children

Researchers have identified a biological basis for asthmatic children who do not respond well to corticosteroid treatment – currently the most effective treatment for chronic asthma and acute asthma attack. [More]
New UM SOM study reveals why thiazide drugs not effective in some patients

New UM SOM study reveals why thiazide drugs not effective in some patients

Every year, more than 120 million prescriptions are written worldwide for thiazide drugs, a group of salt-lowering medicines used to treat high blood pressure. These drugs are often work very well, and over decades have saved hundreds of thousands of lives. [More]
Clot removal improves outcomes in stroke patients

Clot removal improves outcomes in stroke patients

Stroke is the leading cause of severe long-term disability in the United States, and less than 40 percent of patients who experience the most severe form of stroke regain functional independence if they receive the standard drug intervention alone. [More]
Researchers examine how probiotics can help improve health, prevent disease

Researchers examine how probiotics can help improve health, prevent disease

In recent years, research into the benefits of gut bacteria has exploded. Scientists across the globe are examining how these microbes can help improve health and prevent disease. [More]
Studies examine positive and negative outcomes of using health apps

Studies examine positive and negative outcomes of using health apps

Health apps have the potential to make a broad impact on the health of the general population, argues one expert in The BMJ this week. But another explains that there is not enough evidence to support such claims and suggests that health apps may even be harmful. [More]
Johns Hopkins researchers named recipients of Hartwell’s 2014 Individual Biomedical Research Award

Johns Hopkins researchers named recipients of Hartwell’s 2014 Individual Biomedical Research Award

Gul Dolen, M.D., Ph.D., an assistant professor of neuroscience at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, and Eili Y. Klein, Ph.D., an assistant professor of emergency medicine, are among 12 recipients of The Hartwell Foundation’s 2014 Individual Biomedical Research Award competition, the foundation announced on April 1. [More]
New data support use of Exalenz Bioscience's BreathID test for diagnosing H. pylori infection

New data support use of Exalenz Bioscience's BreathID test for diagnosing H. pylori infection

Exalenz Bioscience, a leader in developing and marketing non-invasive medical devices for diagnosing and monitoring a range of gastrointestinal and liver diseases, today announced new published data supporting the use of the Company's point-of-care BreathID urea breath test for diagnosing Helicobacter pylori infection (H. pylori) in the emergency department (ED) setting. [More]
Study examines new Ebola Prediction Score

Study examines new Ebola Prediction Score

Abdominal pain, fever and unexplained bleeding - which are commonly believed to indicate infection with the Ebola virus -- are not significantly predictive of the disease, according to the results of a study examining a new Ebola Prediction Score published online Friday in Annals of Emergency Medicine ("Derivation and Internal Validation of the Ebola Prediction Score for Risk Stratification of Patients with Suspected Ebola Virus Disease"). [More]
Rhode Island Hospital physician comes up with new diagnostic tool for Ebola virus

Rhode Island Hospital physician comes up with new diagnostic tool for Ebola virus

Adam C. Levine, M.D., an emergency medicine physician at Rhode Island Hospital and The Miriam Hospital who treated Ebola-infected patients in Liberia last year, used his field experience to create a tool to determine the likelihood that patients presenting with Ebola symptoms will actually carry the virus. [More]

Online resources can improve the practice of emergency medicine

Two new studies, published online Tuesday in Annals of Emergency Medicine, illustrate the power of social media and the Internet to promote scholarly dialogue around the world and the importance of establishing criteria for what constitutes high-quality blogs and podcasts ("Global Emergency Medicine Journal Club: A Social Media Discussion About the ADJUST-PE Trial" and "Emergency Medicine and Critical Care Blogs and Podcasts: Establishing an International Consensus on Quality"). [More]
New stent retriever device reduces stroke damage

New stent retriever device reduces stroke damage

Elizabeth Celli was experiencing a moderate-to-severe stroke when she arrived at Loyola University Medical Center's Emergency Department. Mrs. Celli was weak on her left side, had difficulty speaking and was unable to walk. But after being treated with a new device called a stent retriever, her symptoms dramatically reversed. [More]
Researchers identify possible blood biomarkers for concussion

Researchers identify possible blood biomarkers for concussion

By looking at the molecular aftermath of concussion in an unusual way, a team of researchers at Brown University and the Lifespan health system has developed a candidate panel of blood biomarkers that can accurately signal mild traumatic brain injury within hours using standard, widely available lab arrays. [More]
NIH awards K23 grant to study effects of carbon dioxide levels after cardiac arrest

NIH awards K23 grant to study effects of carbon dioxide levels after cardiac arrest

The NIH-National Heart Lung and Blood Institute has awarded Brian W. Roberts, MD, emergency medicine physician at Cooper University Health Care and Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine at Cooper Medical School of Rowan University (CMSRU), a Mentored Patient-Oriented Career Development grant (K23) to study post-resuscitation partial pressure of arterial carbon dioxide and neurological outcome after cardiac arrest. [More]
Life-saving water, sanitation and hygiene supplies reaching children affected by Cyclone Pam

Life-saving water, sanitation and hygiene supplies reaching children affected by Cyclone Pam

UNICEF in close collaboration with the Vanuatu Government and WASH Cluster partners have been working amidst logistical, communication and supply challenges to deliver safe drinking water by providing water containers, purification tablets, and soap to communities and evacuation centres in Shefa and Tafea provinces. [More]
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