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Re-engineering cardiac scarring process could improve clinical outcomes for heart disease patients

Re-engineering cardiac scarring process could improve clinical outcomes for heart disease patients

Literal heartbreak, from illness or injury, triggers the body's natural healing mechanisms. [More]
New virtual reality simulator may help researchers learn more about ATV-related crashes

New virtual reality simulator may help researchers learn more about ATV-related crashes

A new virtual reality simulator will help University of Iowa researchers study how and why people lose control while driving all-terrain vehicles. [More]
VentureMed Group receives FDA 510(k) clearance for FLEX Scoring Catheter

VentureMed Group receives FDA 510(k) clearance for FLEX Scoring Catheter

VentureMed Group, Ltd., a medical device company based in northwest Ohio, has received 510(k) clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for the commercial distribution of a new surgical device for treating peripheral artery disease (PAD). [More]
ATACH-2 disputes intensive BP control benefits in acute ICH

ATACH-2 disputes intensive BP control benefits in acute ICH

Reducing systolic blood pressure to less than 140 mmHg has offered no benefits over standard care for patients with acute intracerebral haemorrhage in the ATACH-2 trial. [More]
Experts discuss new therapy options for stroke treatment at EAN Congress

Experts discuss new therapy options for stroke treatment at EAN Congress

There are more well-founded therapy options for the treatment of strokes than ever before. Care has to be reorganised before these innovations are actually used on patients. At the Congress of the European Academy of Neurology in Copenhagen, experts are discussing just how to do that successfully - from guidelines for the use of thrombectomy procedures all the way to the structure and expansion of stroke care units. [More]
Nutrition, safety tips for grilling season

Nutrition, safety tips for grilling season

Cooking meat, including beef, pork, fish, or poultry, with high-temperature methods such as pan frying or grilling directly over an open flame can increase exposure to chemicals that can cause changes in DNA that may increase the risk of cancer, according to the National Cancer Institute. [More]
Temple/St. Luke’s Medical School Grad honors 27 new physicians

Temple/St. Luke’s Medical School Grad honors 27 new physicians

During the four years of medical school training, students can either study, sleep or have a social life, but never all three, joked Joel Rosenfeld, MD, M.Ed, FACS, Chief Academic Officer, St. Luke's University Health Network, and Senior Associate Dean, Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University. [More]
Rural children have high rates of medical complexity

Rural children have high rates of medical complexity

Children in rural areas have high rates of medical complexity and often reside in low-income and medically underserved areas, according to researchers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. [More]
Jumping genes may play crucial role in generation of cancer

Jumping genes may play crucial role in generation of cancer

For more than 50 years, scientists have known of the existence of "jumping genes," strands of DNA material that can move from one location in the genome to another. [More]
New set of practice guidelines from WMS may help in treatment, prevention of drowning

New set of practice guidelines from WMS may help in treatment, prevention of drowning

Drowning is a global threat to human health. Each year, more than 372,000 people die as a result of drowning, with many of those deaths being preventable by simple water safety measures. In order to arm professionals with the most up-to-date clinical protocols, the Wilderness Medical Society has issued a new set of practice guidelines for both the treatment and prevention of drowning, published in the society's official journal, Wilderness and Environmental Medicine. [More]

High doses of Imodium to self-treat opioid addictions could be extremely dangerous

The over-the-counter anti-diarrhea medication Imodium, or its key ingredient loperamide, is increasingly being abused by people attempting to self-treat their opioid addiction, with sometime fatal results. [More]
Vernakalant drug more effective than Ibutilide in treating recent-onset atrial fibrillation

Vernakalant drug more effective than Ibutilide in treating recent-onset atrial fibrillation

Vernakalant, a new drug for treating recent-onset atrial fibrillation, has proved to be considerably more effective than Ibutilide, an established drug in this indication. It was able to normalize patients' heart rhythm more rapidly and with fewer side-effects ocurring. This was revealed by a study conducted at the Department of Emergency Medicine at Medical University of Vienna/General Hospital that has recently been published in "Europace", a journal of the European Society of Cardiology. [More]
Relaxed fireworks laws linked to increased fireworks-related injuries among children

Relaxed fireworks laws linked to increased fireworks-related injuries among children

As states relaxed laws related to fireworks sales during the past decade, emergency doctors saw an increase in both the number of fireworks-related injuries among children and the severity of those injuries, according to new research being presented by faculty from the University of Louisville at the Pediatrics Academic Societies 2016 Meeting. [More]
Diagnosing heart attacks in 1 hour: an interview with Dr Richard Body

Diagnosing heart attacks in 1 hour: an interview with Dr Richard Body

Cardiac troponin is a highly sensitive and specific biomarker for myocardial injury but concentrations in the blood rise over several hours after the onset of an acute myocardial infarction. [More]
One-dose of dexamethasone can improve outcomes of asthmatic patients in ER

One-dose of dexamethasone can improve outcomes of asthmatic patients in ER

Adults with asthma who were treated with one-dose dexamethasone in the emergency department had only slightly higher relapse than patients who were treated with a 5-day course of prednisone. [More]
Researchers observe worrisome increase in anaphylaxis rate

Researchers observe worrisome increase in anaphylaxis rate

Anaphylaxis, known to be a sudden and potentially life-threatening allergic reaction, seems to be increasing among children, according to a new study led by a team at the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre. [More]
Scientists identify key pathway that regulates 'switch' between wakefulness and sleep

Scientists identify key pathway that regulates 'switch' between wakefulness and sleep

Falling asleep and waking up are key transitions in everyone's day. Millions of people have trouble with these transitions - they find it hard to fall asleep or stay asleep at night, and hard to stay awake during the day. Despite decades of research, how these transitions work - the neurobiological mechanics of our circadian rhythm - has remained largely a mystery to brain scientists. [More]
Johns Hopkins study suggests updated universal screening for hepatitis C virus

Johns Hopkins study suggests updated universal screening for hepatitis C virus

A review of blood samples for nearly 5,000 patients seen at The Johns Hopkins Hospital Emergency Department suggests that federal guidelines for hepatitis C virus (HCV) screening may be missing up to a quarter of all cases and argues for updated universal screening. [More]
Inexpensive paper tape can help prevent incidence and frequency of foot blisters

Inexpensive paper tape can help prevent incidence and frequency of foot blisters

Ten years ago, Grant Lipman, MD, an emergency medicine physician, was working as a doctor for endurance athletes who were running 25 to 50 miles a day in various parts of the world, from China to Antarctica to Chile. [More]
Lung ultrasound may be highly effective, safe for diagnosing pneumonia in children

Lung ultrasound may be highly effective, safe for diagnosing pneumonia in children

Lung ultrasound has been shown to be highly effective and safe for diagnosing pneumonia in children and a potential substitute for chest X-ray, according to a study conducted at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. Results are currently published in the medical journal Chest. [More]
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