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New stent retriever device reduces stroke damage

New stent retriever device reduces stroke damage

Elizabeth Celli was experiencing a moderate-to-severe stroke when she arrived at Loyola University Medical Center's Emergency Department. Mrs. Celli was weak on her left side, had difficulty speaking and was unable to walk. But after being treated with a new device called a stent retriever, her symptoms dramatically reversed. [More]
Researchers identify possible blood biomarkers for concussion

Researchers identify possible blood biomarkers for concussion

By looking at the molecular aftermath of concussion in an unusual way, a team of researchers at Brown University and the Lifespan health system has developed a candidate panel of blood biomarkers that can accurately signal mild traumatic brain injury within hours using standard, widely available lab arrays. [More]
NIH awards K23 grant to study effects of carbon dioxide levels after cardiac arrest

NIH awards K23 grant to study effects of carbon dioxide levels after cardiac arrest

The NIH-National Heart Lung and Blood Institute has awarded Brian W. Roberts, MD, emergency medicine physician at Cooper University Health Care and Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine at Cooper Medical School of Rowan University (CMSRU), a Mentored Patient-Oriented Career Development grant (K23) to study post-resuscitation partial pressure of arterial carbon dioxide and neurological outcome after cardiac arrest. [More]
Life-saving water, sanitation and hygiene supplies reaching children affected by Cyclone Pam

Life-saving water, sanitation and hygiene supplies reaching children affected by Cyclone Pam

UNICEF in close collaboration with the Vanuatu Government and WASH Cluster partners have been working amidst logistical, communication and supply challenges to deliver safe drinking water by providing water containers, purification tablets, and soap to communities and evacuation centres in Shefa and Tafea provinces. [More]

Researchers explore impact of installing alcohol ignition interlock devices in vehicles

If every new car made in the United States had a built-in blood alcohol level tester that prevented impaired drivers from driving the vehicle, how many lives could be saved, injuries prevented, and injury-related dollars left unspent? [More]
Experts call for global review of sepsis guidelines

Experts call for global review of sepsis guidelines

Experts are calling for a global review of guidelines used to diagnose sepsis, after a study found one in eight patients with infections severe enough to need admission to an Intensive Care Unit in Australia and New Zealand, did not meet current criteria. [More]
Living near greened vacant lots reduces stress

Living near greened vacant lots reduces stress

Greening vacant lots may be associated with biologic reductions in stress, according to a new study from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. Residents who walked near newly greened vacant lots had significantly lower heart rates compared to walking near a blighted, or neglected, vacant lot. [More]
Duke researchers identify factors that correlate with repeat ER visits for kidney stones

Duke researchers identify factors that correlate with repeat ER visits for kidney stones

One in nine patients released from the emergency department after treatment for a kidney stone will face a repeat visit, according to findings by Duke Medicine researchers. [More]
People’s health at the centre of new global blueprint to reduce disaster risks

People’s health at the centre of new global blueprint to reduce disaster risks

Ten years since adopting the Hyogo Framework for Action shortly after the Indian Ocean Tsunami, government representatives have gathered in Sendai to negotiate a new framework for global action to reduce the risks of disasters. For the first time, protecting people's health is at the centre of such a framework. [More]
New risk-evaluation protocol can help emergency departments evaluate chest-pain patients

New risk-evaluation protocol can help emergency departments evaluate chest-pain patients

A recently developed risk-evaluation protocol can help hospital emergency department personnel more efficiently determine which patients with acute chest pain can be sent home safely, according to a randomized trial conducted at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center. [More]
60,000 children in need of immediate assistance after Cyclone Pam in Vanuatu; at least 72,000 out of school

60,000 children in need of immediate assistance after Cyclone Pam in Vanuatu; at least 72,000 out of school

With Tropical Cyclone Pam ripping through Vanuatu from late Friday night (13th March) into the early hours of Saturday morning, UNICEF Pacific reminds that 45% of the population is children and they are particularly vulnerable in any emergency. [More]
MGH study suggests that bariatric surgery can reduce risk of asthma attacks

MGH study suggests that bariatric surgery can reduce risk of asthma attacks

A study led by Massachusetts General Hospital investigators suggests that bariatric surgery can significantly reduce the risk of asthma attacks - also called exacerbations - in obese patients with asthma. [More]
Survey: Physicians, patients overestimate risk of heart attack or death for possible ACS

Survey: Physicians, patients overestimate risk of heart attack or death for possible ACS

Both physicians and patients overestimate the risk of heart attack or death for possible acute coronary syndrome (ACS) as well as the potential benefit of hospital admission for possible ACS. [More]
New injectable polymer could strengthen blood clots

New injectable polymer could strengthen blood clots

Most military battlefield casualties die before ever reaching a surgical hospital. Of those soldiers who might potentially survive, most die from uncontrolled bleeding. [More]
Advanced clinical decision support tools reduce mortality for pneumonia patients

Advanced clinical decision support tools reduce mortality for pneumonia patients

A new study by Intermountain Medical Center researchers in Salt Lake City found that using advanced clinical decision support tools reduces mortality for the 1.1 million patients in the Unites States who are treated for pneumonia each year. [More]
Young immigrants to Canada at greater risk of developing IBD

Young immigrants to Canada at greater risk of developing IBD

The younger a person is when they immigrate to Canada, the higher their risk of developing inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and its major subtypes Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, according to a study by researchers at the University of Ottawa, the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences and the Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario. [More]
Advanced clinical decision support tools help reduce mortality for pneumonia patients

Advanced clinical decision support tools help reduce mortality for pneumonia patients

A new study by Intermountain Medical Center researchers in Salt Lake City found that using advanced clinical decision support tools reduces mortality for the 1.1 million patients in the Unites States who are treated for pneumonia each year. [More]
Population-based approach to health planning can prevent disparities in access to stroke care, says study

Population-based approach to health planning can prevent disparities in access to stroke care, says study

Stroke is one of the leading causes of death and disability in the United States, but access to rapid EMS care and appropriate stroke care centers with the ability to deliver acute stroke therapies can drastically mitigate the debilitating effects of a stroke. [More]
European launch of the Proxima miniature in-line blood gas analyser at ISICEM 2015

European launch of the Proxima miniature in-line blood gas analyser at ISICEM 2015

Sphere Medical, innovator in critical care monitoring and diagnostics equipment, will launch its ground-breaking in-line patient dedicated arterial blood gas analyser in Germany, Netherlands and Belgium at ISICEM 2015. [More]
Swiss teenager with classic sudden symptoms of stroke diagnosed with Lyme disease

Swiss teenager with classic sudden symptoms of stroke diagnosed with Lyme disease

A Swiss teenager, recently returned home from a discotheque, came to the emergency department with classic sudden symptoms of stroke, only to be diagnosed with Lyme disease. [More]
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