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Study: Around 6% survive cardiac arrest outside of hospital setting

Study: Around 6% survive cardiac arrest outside of hospital setting

Cardiac arrest strikes almost 600,000 people each year, killing the vast majority of those individuals, says a new report from the Institute of Medicine. Every year in the U.S., approximately 395,000 cases of cardiac arrest occur outside of a hospital setting, in which less than 6 percent survive. Approximately 200,000 cardiac arrests occur each year in hospitals, and 24 percent of those patients survive. Estimates suggest that cardiac arrest is the third leading cause of death in the U.S. behind cancer and heart disease. [More]
Practice caution with Fourth of July fireworks, urge Vanderbilt doctors

Practice caution with Fourth of July fireworks, urge Vanderbilt doctors

Fireworks and the Fourth of July can be a dangerous mix. Doctors at Vanderbilt University Medical Center urge caution with consumer fireworks and suggest leaving these displays to the experts. [More]
Two antibodies show early promise in preventing and treating MERS

Two antibodies show early promise in preventing and treating MERS

As the South Korean epidemic of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) continues unabated, researchers have raced to find treatments for the deadly virus, which has killed more than 400 people since it was first discovered three years ago in Saudi Arabia. [More]
Study proposes use of soft computing solutions to predict survival in multiple trauma patients

Study proposes use of soft computing solutions to predict survival in multiple trauma patients

The NUP/UPNA-Public University of Navarre has developed a piece of work that applies soft computing solutions to predicting survival in multiple trauma patients. [More]
UM SOM researcher uncovers new details about the body's response to flu virus

UM SOM researcher uncovers new details about the body's response to flu virus

The flu virus can be lethal. But what is often just as dangerous is the body's own reaction to the invader. This immune response consists of an inflammatory attack, meant to kill the virus. But if it gets too aggressive, this counterattack can end up harming the body's own tissues, causing damage that can lead to death. [More]

2015 Ernst & Young Health Care Entrepreneur of the Year award for Neighbors Emergency Center

Setul G. Patel, MD, MBA, CEO of Neighbors Emergency Center won the 2015 Ernst & Young Health Care Entrepreneur of the Year, Gulf Coast Region, announced Thursday, June 25, 2015. [More]
ACEP: Supreme Court verdict may not stem the rising tide of visits to emergency departments

ACEP: Supreme Court verdict may not stem the rising tide of visits to emergency departments

The decision today by the Supreme Court will prevent millions of people from losing their health insurance, but does not stem the rising tide of visits to the nation's emergency departments or solve other problems emerging in the post-Affordable Care Act health care system, according to a statement from Dr. Michael Gerardi, president of the American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP). [More]
World MRSA Day Kickoff Event and Global C. difficile Summit to be held on September 26, 2015 in Illinois

World MRSA Day Kickoff Event and Global C. difficile Summit to be held on September 26, 2015 in Illinois

Methicillin-resistant Staphyloccocus aureus (MRSA), the antibiotic resistant form of Staphylococcus aureus is rampant in U.S. healthcare facilities, in the community, in livestock and in the environment. [More]
Vitamin K-deficient bleeding increasingly common in newborns

Vitamin K-deficient bleeding increasingly common in newborns

Vitamin K, which has been administered to newborns as an injection since it was first recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics in 1961, is vital for blood to clot normally. Despite it being given as standard medical practice since then, vitamin K-deficient bleeding (VKDB) is being seen more often in newborns than it has in decades. [More]
Pediatric study looks at evidence-based predictors of biphasic allergic reactions

Pediatric study looks at evidence-based predictors of biphasic allergic reactions

Children are more likely to have a repeat, delayed anaphylactic reaction from the same allergic cause, depending on the severity of the initial reaction. The first pediatric study to look at the predictors for this phenomenon was published today in Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. [More]
Two MGH physicians describe their experiences in Nepal earthquake relief efforts

Two MGH physicians describe their experiences in Nepal earthquake relief efforts

Two Massachusetts General Hospital physicians who participated in the international response to the major earthquakes that hit Nepal in April and May each describe their experiences in Perspectives articles receiving Online First publication today in the New England Journal of Medicine. [More]

Selecting health insurance plan on HealthCare.gov particularly challenging for young adults

When trying to enroll in a health insurance plan through HealthCare.gov during the first open enrollment period of the Affordable Care Act's (ACA) health insurance marketplaces, young adults were confused by unfamiliar health insurance terms, concerned about the affordability of plan options, and unsure how to seek good primary care. [More]

TeamHealth launches PreOpGuide app to reduce unnecessary pre-operative testing, lessen surgical delays

TeamHealth, a leading provider of outsourced physician staffing solutions for hospitals, today announced the launch of PreOpGuide, a free mobile app for clinicians designed to reduce or eliminate unnecessary pre-operative testing, lessen surgical delays and cancellations, help ensure patients are properly prepared for surgery and reduce costs for both patients and hospitals. [More]
Stony Brook University, CadheRx Therapeutics sign licensing agreement for anti-cancer technology

Stony Brook University, CadheRx Therapeutics sign licensing agreement for anti-cancer technology

Stony Brook University has entered into a licensing agreement with a startup company, CadheRx Therapeutics, to develop and market an anti-cancer technology discovered by Sabine Brouxhon, MD, Clinical Associate Professor in the Department of Emergency Medicine at Stony Brook University School of Medicine. [More]

New evidence-based protocol to treat severe pain in emergency department patients

Simply asking the question, "Do you want more pain medication?" resulted in satisfactory pain control in 99 percent of emergency department patients participating in a study. [More]
Study explores 'laser welding' for sealing corneal transplants

Study explores 'laser welding' for sealing corneal transplants

Some 30,000 years ago, prehistoric man wielded animal bones as needles to suture otherwise lethal wounds. This tactic has been used, and improved upon, over time and remains the basis of surgical procedures conducted today. Even with radical new surgical techniques, which rely on metallic and polymeric staples or chemical adhesives to seal incisions, infection and permanent scarring remain major concerns. The success of any wound closure is entirely dependent on the physician's skill set alone. [More]
Strategies needed to optimize communications between police and ED workers

Strategies needed to optimize communications between police and ED workers

A good working relationship with police is essential for the smooth operation of a busy Emergency Department. Police are in and out of EDs regularly, supporting EMS, transporting patients and helping to provide a safe environment for hospital staff. [More]
ProMedica, UT partner to build one of nation’s top academic medical centers in northwest Ohio

ProMedica, UT partner to build one of nation’s top academic medical centers in northwest Ohio

In just 10 years, this nation could have a shortage of between 46,000 and 90,000 physicians. This is according to a recent report released by the Association of American Medical Colleges. Major contributing factors include a growing and aging population, plus one-third of practicing physicians with plans to retire in the next decade. These shortages are expected to be particularly challenging for communities the size of Toledo competing with larger metropolitan areas to attract future doctors and caregivers. [More]
Emergency medicine faces special challenges with changeover in medical diagnosis codes

Emergency medicine faces special challenges with changeover in medical diagnosis codes

Emergency medicine faces special challenges during this fall's changeover in how medical diagnoses are coded. Nearly a quarter of all ER clinical encounters could pose difficulties. [More]
Esophageal cancer patients treated with proton therapy experience less toxic side effects

Esophageal cancer patients treated with proton therapy experience less toxic side effects

New research by scientists at the University of Maryland School of Medicine has found that esophageal cancer patients treated with proton therapy experienced significantly less toxic side effects than patients treated with older radiation therapies. [More]
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