Emergency Medicine News and Research RSS Feed - Emergency Medicine News and Research

Ebola Virus and Public Health: A special feature by Disaster Medicine and Public Health

Ebola Virus and Public Health: A special feature by Disaster Medicine and Public Health

Accurate knowledge regarding Ebola is critical and pertinent for practicing physicians and clinicians given the current risk of hazardous global outbreak and epidemic. [More]
MGH, MIT partner to accelerate development of diagnostic tools and therapies

MGH, MIT partner to accelerate development of diagnostic tools and therapies

A novel partnership between Massachusetts General Hospital and Massachusetts Institute of Technology is addressing three major challenges in clinical medicine – improving the diagnosis of disease, developing new approaches to prevent and treat infectious and autoimmune diseases, and developing more accurate methods of diagnosing and treating major neurodegenerative and psychiatric diseases. While individual collaborations between MGH and MIT investigators are nothing new, this formalized strategic partnership is designed to accelerate the development of diagnostic tools and therapies. [More]
Massachusetts General Hospital installs Agfa HealthCare's direct radiography technologies

Massachusetts General Hospital installs Agfa HealthCare's direct radiography technologies

Agfa HealthCare announced today that Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), a teaching hospital affiliated with Harvard Medical School located in Boston Mass., installed several of Agfa HealthCare's direct radiography (DR) technologies to update their inpatient and outpatient facilities. The eight DX-D 100 mobile DR systems and eight DX-D 600 fully automated DR rooms replace previous technologies. [More]
Improper splinting can lead to swelling and other skin complications

Improper splinting can lead to swelling and other skin complications

More than 90 percent of potential pediatric fractures are splinted improperly in emergency rooms and urgent care centers, which can lead to swelling and skin injuries, according to a study by researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. [More]
Web-based system could help improve detection of disease outbreaks, say researchers

Web-based system could help improve detection of disease outbreaks, say researchers

A web-based system that allows preschools and child care centers to report illnesses to local public health departments could improve the detection of disease outbreaks and allow resources to be mobilized more quickly, according to University of Michigan research to be presented Saturday, Oct. 11 at the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) National Conference & Exhibition in San Diego. [More]
First study of promising Ebola vaccine commenced in West Africa

First study of promising Ebola vaccine commenced in West Africa

Professor Myron M. Levine, MD, Director of the Center for Vaccine Development at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, and UM SOM Dean E. Albert Reece MD, PhD, MBA, announced today that the CVD, in conjunction with its sister institution, The Center for Vaccine Development of Mali and the Ministry of Health of Mali, have begun a clinical trial in health care workers (and other front-line workers) to evaluate a promising experimental Ebola vaccine. [More]
HerStory app helps women with breast cancer to share their voices with other patients

HerStory app helps women with breast cancer to share their voices with other patients

As physicians spend less time with their patients, often as little as 10-15 minutes per appointment, they grow increasingly wary of the limited emotional support they can provide within that time frame. [More]
Bedside ultrasound machine in pediatric ER is cost-effective, reduces length of stay in the ER

Bedside ultrasound machine in pediatric ER is cost-effective, reduces length of stay in the ER

Using a portable or bedside ultrasound machine in the pediatric emergency room has been proven to lessen the length of stay in the ER and to provide images equal in accuracy to x-ray or CT scan without exposing children to potentially harmful radiation. [More]
Large-scale study results of cardiac arrest cases now available on ScienceDirect

Large-scale study results of cardiac arrest cases now available on ScienceDirect

The results of a four-year international study of 2060 cardiac arrest cases across 15 hospitals published and available now on ScienceDirect. [More]
GW physician highlights equitable, accessible health care for people with disabilities

GW physician highlights equitable, accessible health care for people with disabilities

Nearly 20 percent of Americans have a disability, yet only 25 percent of medical schools include in their curricula caring for people with disabilities. Numerous reports have documented that people with disabilities have poorer health and receive inferior care. [More]
Vitamin D supplement significantly reduces symptoms of winter-related atopic dermatitis

Vitamin D supplement significantly reduces symptoms of winter-related atopic dermatitis

A study conducted in more than 100 Mongolian schoolchildren found that daily treatment with a vitamin D supplement significantly reduced the symptoms of winter-related atopic dermatitis, a type of eczema. [More]
Study uncovers new pathway for treating high blood pressure, heart failure

Study uncovers new pathway for treating high blood pressure, heart failure

New research by scientists at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and the Ottawa Heart Institute has uncovered a new pathway by which the brain uses an unusual steroid to control blood pressure. [More]
AAPA welcomes NGA’s report that highlights role of PAs in the U.S. healthcare

AAPA welcomes NGA’s report that highlights role of PAs in the U.S. healthcare

The American Academy of Physician Assistants welcomes a new report from the National Governors Association (NGA) that highlights the important—and rapidly growing—role of physician assistants (PAs) in the U.S. healthcare workforce. [More]
Thirteen research projects to explore nondrug approaches to manage pain, other health conditions

Thirteen research projects to explore nondrug approaches to manage pain, other health conditions

Thirteen research projects totaling approximately $21.7 million over 5 years will explore nondrug approaches to managing pain and related health conditions such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), drug abuse, and sleep issues. The effort seeks to enhance options for the management of pain and associated problems in U.S. military personnel, veterans, and their families. [More]
Elsevier honored at BMA Medical Book Awards ceremony

Elsevier honored at BMA Medical Book Awards ceremony

Elsevier, a world-leading provider of scientific, technical and medical information products and services, announced today that 28 of its professional and scholarly products were honored at the British Medical Association's annual BMA Medical Book Awards ceremony at BMA House in London on Sept. 22, 2014. [More]
1 out of 3 major trauma patients undertriaged in the U.S., study finds

1 out of 3 major trauma patients undertriaged in the U.S., study finds

According to the American College of Surgeons' Committee on Trauma, patients with severe injuries should be treated at level I or level II trauma centers. Those centers have the resources to provide the best care for those patients. [More]
UVA earns national award for enhancing care for heart attack patients

UVA earns national award for enhancing care for heart attack patients

The University of Virginia Health System has earned a national award from the American College of Cardiology for enhancing care for heart attack patients. [More]
Intimate partner violence may trigger irritable bowel syndrome, insomnia

Intimate partner violence may trigger irritable bowel syndrome, insomnia

One in five men in the U.S. reports violence towards their spouse or significant other, says a new nationally-representative study by the University of Michigan. [More]
Researchers aim to safely and quickly suppress food allergies in human

Researchers aim to safely and quickly suppress food allergies in human

In mice, the answer appears to be "yes," but making sure the same can happen in humans is a task that Fred Finkelman, MD, professor of medicine and pediatrics in the University of Cincinnati's (UC) College of Medicine and a researcher at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, is attempting to tackle. [More]
Sepsis patients more likely to survive when treated at hospital with higher volume of cases

Sepsis patients more likely to survive when treated at hospital with higher volume of cases

Patients with sepsis, one of the most time-sensitive and hard-to-detect illnesses in medicine, are more likely to survive the life-threatening condition when treated at a hospital that sees a higher volume of sepsis cases. [More]