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Tamsulosin works better on large kidney stones

Tamsulosin works better on large kidney stones

Tamsulosin works no better than placebo on small kidney stones, but does improve passage of more large kidney stones than placebo does. The results of this large clinical trial evaluating tamsulosin versus placebo were published online Friday in Annals of Emergency Medicine ("Distal Ureteric Stones and Tamsulosin: A Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Randomized, Multi-Center Trial (The DUST Trial)"). [More]
ER physicians can identify patients at risk of future drinking-related trauma with 10-point questionnaire

ER physicians can identify patients at risk of future drinking-related trauma with 10-point questionnaire

Emergency room physicians treating patients with alcohol-related trauma can better identify those at risk of future drinking-related trauma with a 10-point questionnaire rather than the standard blood alcohol content test, according to a study in The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association. [More]
Emergency physicians can safely reduce x-rays in kids with ankle injuries

Emergency physicians can safely reduce x-rays in kids with ankle injuries

Emergency physicians can safely reduce x-rays in children with hurt ankles by as much as 23 percent and save emergency patients both money and time. The results of a cost analysis of the Low Risk Ankle Rule (LRAR) were published online Tuesday in Annals of Emergency Medicine "Cost Consequence Analysis of Implementing the Low Risk Ankle Rule in Emergency Departments". [More]
Patients' own genetically engineered immune cells show significant success against multiple myeloma

Patients' own genetically engineered immune cells show significant success against multiple myeloma

In recent years, immunotherapy has emerged as a promising treatment for certain cancers. Now this strategy, which uses patients' own immune cells, genetically engineered to target tumors, has shown significant success against multiple myeloma, a cancer of the plasma cells that is largely incurable. [More]
Alternative approach to treat fatal blood clots found to be more effective in patients

Alternative approach to treat fatal blood clots found to be more effective in patients

Potentially fatal blood clots account for thousands of emergency room visits each year and often those patients are admitted to the hospital, treated with an injectable anticoagulant and monitored for a few days. [More]
New study highlights burden of community-acquired pneumonia hospitalizations among U.S. adults

New study highlights burden of community-acquired pneumonia hospitalizations among U.S. adults

Viruses, not bacteria, are the most commonly detected respiratory pathogens in U.S. adults hospitalized with pneumonia, according to a New England Journal of Medicine study released today and conducted by researchers at Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and hospitals in Chicago and Nashville, including Vanderbilt University Medical Center. [More]
Vanderbilt doctors urge Middle Tennesseans to take extra care to avoid heat-related illnesses

Vanderbilt doctors urge Middle Tennesseans to take extra care to avoid heat-related illnesses

With temperatures holding steady in the upper 90s and even reaching 100 degrees this week, doctors at Vanderbilt University Medical Center are urging Middle Tennesseans to take extra precautions to avoid heat-related illnesses. [More]
New study identifies potential antidepressant medications with few side effects

New study identifies potential antidepressant medications with few side effects

A new study by researchers at University of Maryland School of Medicine has identified promising compounds that could successfully treat depression in less than 24 hours while minimizing side effects. Although they have not yet been tested in people, the compounds could offer significant advantages over current antidepressant medications. [More]
Canadian researchers launch world's first viral therapy clinical trial to attack and kill cancer cells

Canadian researchers launch world's first viral therapy clinical trial to attack and kill cancer cells

Canadian researchers have launched the world's first clinical trial of a novel investigational therapy that uses a combination of two viruses to attack and kill cancer cells, and stimulate an anti-cancer immune response. Previous research by this team and others worldwide suggests that this approach could be very powerful, and could have fewer side effects than conventional chemotherapy and radiation, although it will take years to rigorously test through this trial and others. [More]
Restrictive policies for blood transfusions could produce significant cost savings for NHS

Restrictive policies for blood transfusions could produce significant cost savings for NHS

Changing clinical thresholds for the single leading reason for blood transfusions could safely produce significant savings for the NHS, according to NHS Blood and Transplant research published in The Lancet tomorrow. [More]
Henry Ford Hospital wins Get With The Guidelines-Stroke Gold Quality Achievement Award

Henry Ford Hospital wins Get With The Guidelines-Stroke Gold Quality Achievement Award

The Stroke and Neurovascular Disease Center at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit has received the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association's Get With The Guidelines-Stroke Gold Quality Achievement Award. [More]
Telstra Health introduces ReadyCare telemedicine service that connects patients to doctors

Telstra Health introduces ReadyCare telemedicine service that connects patients to doctors

Telstra Health today launched ReadyCare, its GP telemedicine service that gives Australians the choice to connect with a doctor using phone or video and receive advice, treatment, diagnosis and prescriptions. [More]
Study: Around 6% survive cardiac arrest outside of hospital setting

Study: Around 6% survive cardiac arrest outside of hospital setting

Cardiac arrest strikes almost 600,000 people each year, killing the vast majority of those individuals, says a new report from the Institute of Medicine. Every year in the U.S., approximately 395,000 cases of cardiac arrest occur outside of a hospital setting, in which less than 6 percent survive. Approximately 200,000 cardiac arrests occur each year in hospitals, and 24 percent of those patients survive. Estimates suggest that cardiac arrest is the third leading cause of death in the U.S. behind cancer and heart disease. [More]
Practice caution with Fourth of July fireworks, urge Vanderbilt doctors

Practice caution with Fourth of July fireworks, urge Vanderbilt doctors

Fireworks and the Fourth of July can be a dangerous mix. Doctors at Vanderbilt University Medical Center urge caution with consumer fireworks and suggest leaving these displays to the experts. [More]
Two antibodies show early promise in preventing and treating MERS

Two antibodies show early promise in preventing and treating MERS

As the South Korean epidemic of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) continues unabated, researchers have raced to find treatments for the deadly virus, which has killed more than 400 people since it was first discovered three years ago in Saudi Arabia. [More]

Study proposes use of soft computing solutions to predict survival in multiple trauma patients

The NUP/UPNA-Public University of Navarre has developed a piece of work that applies soft computing solutions to predicting survival in multiple trauma patients. [More]
UM SOM researcher uncovers new details about the body's response to flu virus

UM SOM researcher uncovers new details about the body's response to flu virus

The flu virus can be lethal. But what is often just as dangerous is the body's own reaction to the invader. This immune response consists of an inflammatory attack, meant to kill the virus. But if it gets too aggressive, this counterattack can end up harming the body's own tissues, causing damage that can lead to death. [More]

2015 Ernst & Young Health Care Entrepreneur of the Year award for Neighbors Emergency Center

Setul G. Patel, MD, MBA, CEO of Neighbors Emergency Center won the 2015 Ernst & Young Health Care Entrepreneur of the Year, Gulf Coast Region, announced Thursday, June 25, 2015. [More]

ACEP: Supreme Court verdict may not stem the rising tide of visits to emergency departments

The decision today by the Supreme Court will prevent millions of people from losing their health insurance, but does not stem the rising tide of visits to the nation's emergency departments or solve other problems emerging in the post-Affordable Care Act health care system, according to a statement from Dr. Michael Gerardi, president of the American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP). [More]
World MRSA Day Kickoff Event and Global C. difficile Summit to be held on September 26, 2015 in Illinois

World MRSA Day Kickoff Event and Global C. difficile Summit to be held on September 26, 2015 in Illinois

Methicillin-resistant Staphyloccocus aureus (MRSA), the antibiotic resistant form of Staphylococcus aureus is rampant in U.S. healthcare facilities, in the community, in livestock and in the environment. [More]
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