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Pullman Regional Hospital implements new incident management and patient safety system

Pullman Regional Hospital implements new incident management and patient safety system

Pullman Regional Hospital and RGP Healthcare, a division of Resources Global Professionals, today jointly announced that Pullman Regional is implementing Pavisse™, a new, state-of-the-art incident management and patient safety system. [More]
Study identifies discrimination, alcohol and tobacco as major predictors of panic attacks in minority Americans

Study identifies discrimination, alcohol and tobacco as major predictors of panic attacks in minority Americans

A new study has identified discrimination, alcohol and tobacco as significant predictors of minority Americans' experiencing panic attacks — fearful spells with psychological symptoms that last a few minutes and are often debilitating and disruptive. [More]
Children's Surgery Verification Quality Improvement Program releases new standards document

Children's Surgery Verification Quality Improvement Program releases new standards document

The Children's Surgery Verification Quality Improvement Program, a Quality Program of the American College of Surgeons, has released its latest standards document, Optimal Resources for Children's Surgical Care. [More]
FDA approves Allergan's sNDA to update label for DALVANCE (dalbavancin) for injection

FDA approves Allergan's sNDA to update label for DALVANCE (dalbavancin) for injection

Allergan plc, a leading global pharmaceutical company, today announced the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the company's supplemental new drug application (sNDA) to update the label for DALVANCE (dalbavancin) for injection. [More]
Duke researchers closer to developing rapid blood test for bacterial and viral infections

Duke researchers closer to developing rapid blood test for bacterial and viral infections

Researchers at Duke Health are fine-tuning a test that can determine whether a respiratory illness is caused by infection from a virus or bacteria so that antibiotics can be more precisely prescribed. [More]
Temple University Hospital makes strides in confronting prescription drug abuse

Temple University Hospital makes strides in confronting prescription drug abuse

Prescription drug abuse has become a public health crisis in the U.S., and Temple University Hospital has made strides in confronting this critical situation. [More]
UM SOM study leads to FDA approval of Neulasta drug for treatment of radiation injury

UM SOM study leads to FDA approval of Neulasta drug for treatment of radiation injury

As a result of research performed by scientists at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the use of a drug to treat the deleterious effects of radiation exposure following a nuclear incident. The drug, Neulasta, is one of a very small number that have been approved for the treatment of acute radiation injury. [More]
UCSF-led study shows increase in use of CT scans in patients with non-serious injuries

UCSF-led study shows increase in use of CT scans in patients with non-serious injuries

Twice as many patients with non-serious injuries, such as fractures or neck strain, are undergoing CT scans in emergency departments at California hospitals, according to a UCSF-led study, which tracked the use of the imaging from 2005 to 2013. [More]
Omnicell's revolutionary medication automation cabinet system saves cost, increases efficiency

Omnicell's revolutionary medication automation cabinet system saves cost, increases efficiency

An 18-month trial in the trust which opened England’s first hospital dedicated to emergency care, Northumbria Specialist Emergency Care Hospital, has found that significant cost-savings and efficiencies can be made by installing a revolutionary medication automation cabinet system provided by Omnicell Ltd, a leading provider of medication adherence packaging and automated healthcare solutions. [More]
UM SOM selected to work with BARDA to develop radiologic and nuclear countermeasures

UM SOM selected to work with BARDA to develop radiologic and nuclear countermeasures

University of Maryland School of Medicine Department of Radiation Oncology Chair and Professor William F. Regine, MD, FACR, FACRO, and UM SOM Dean E. Albert Reece, MD, PhD, MBA, announced today that researchers at the UM SOM have been selected as key contractors by the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority, for its Radiation Nuclear Animal Model Development program. [More]
Troponin T test provides possible one hour diagnosis of heart attack

Troponin T test provides possible one hour diagnosis of heart attack

Results from the TRAPID-AMI clinical study have been published online by the Annals of Emergency Medicine, confirming a novel approach for a more rapid diagnosis of heart attack in patients with acute chest pain. [More]
UM SOM to team up with industry to develop vaccine for preventing deadly bacterial infections

UM SOM to team up with industry to develop vaccine for preventing deadly bacterial infections

The Center for Vaccine Development at the University of Maryland School of Medicine will participate in a partnership with industry to develop a vaccine to prevent a group of deadly bacterial infections that occur commonly among hospital patients. [More]

OptMed obtains FDA 510(k) marketing clearance for topical skin adhesive

OptMed Inc., a medical device manufacturer, announced today that the Company received 510(k) marketing clearance from the US Food and Drug Administration for its BondEase product, a topical skin adhesive intended for the closure of surgical incisions and lacerations as an alternative to sutures and staples. [More]
Ebola health-care workers develop guidelines for treating children during future outbreaks

Ebola health-care workers develop guidelines for treating children during future outbreaks

When the Ebola virus outbreak erupted in West Africa in 2014, children infected with the virus -- particularly those under age 5 -- faced overwhelming challenges. Not only was there a high death rate among young children infected with the disease, they often were isolated from their families, leaving them feeling distressed and without the intensive care they needed. [More]
Pitt study shows doctors use different body language depending on patients' race

Pitt study shows doctors use different body language depending on patients' race

Physicians give less compassionate nonverbal cues when treating seriously ill black patients compared with their white counterparts, a small University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine trial revealed. It is the first to look at such interactions in a time-pressured, end-of-life situation. [More]
Emergency physicians propose three interventions to improve cardiac arrest survival rates

Emergency physicians propose three interventions to improve cardiac arrest survival rates

Although survival rates for people who suffer cardiac arrest outside a hospital are extremely low in most places, emergency physicians propose three interventions to improve survival rates and functional outcomes in any community and urge additional federal funding for cardiac resuscitation research in an editorial published online last Wednesday in Annals of Emergency Medicine ("IOM Says Times to Act to Improve Cardiac Arrest Survival ... Here's How"). [More]

Sharp increase in drug shortages affects US emergency departments

A new study reveals that drug shortages affecting emergency care have skyrocketed in the United States in recent years. While the prevalence of such shortages fell from 2002 to 2007; the number of shortages sharply increased by 373% (from 26 to 123) from 2008 to 2014. [More]
Opioid prescribing guideline has immediate, sustained impact on prescribing rates

Opioid prescribing guideline has immediate, sustained impact on prescribing rates

Emergency medicine physicians at Temple University Hospital have found that an opioid prescribing guideline had an immediate and sustained impact on opioid prescribing rates for minor conditions and chronic noncancer pain in an acute care setting. [More]
Discovery Life's new unscripted docudrama series highlights lifesaving work by SOM and Shock Trauma caregivers

Discovery Life's new unscripted docudrama series highlights lifesaving work by SOM and Shock Trauma caregivers

Discovery Life's new unscripted docudrama series Shock Trauma: Edge of Life follows a team of medical professionals at the world-renown R Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center, University of Maryland ("Shock Trauma"). [More]
Medication poisoning threatens young children in poor areas

Medication poisoning threatens young children in poor areas

Children younger than 5 who live in economically disadvantaged areas had a greater risk of medication poisoning that resulted in referral to a health care facility, according to scientists at the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health and the University of California, San Diego. These areas were rural and experienced high unemployment, along with lower rates of high school graduation and lower household income. [More]
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