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NewYork-Presbyterian launches new suite of telehealth services to improve, expand patient care

NewYork-Presbyterian launches new suite of telehealth services to improve, expand patient care

NewYork-Presbyterian has announced the rollout of NYP OnDemand, a new suite of digital health services designed to improve and expand patient care, while also extending access to the clinical expertise of NewYork-Presbyterian's physicians to their peers throughout the Hospital's vast healthcare network. [More]
Study shows physicians accept shaken baby syndrome, abusive head trauma as valid diagnoses

Study shows physicians accept shaken baby syndrome, abusive head trauma as valid diagnoses

Survey data reveals a high degree of medical consensus that shaking a young child is capable of producing subdural hematoma (a life-threatening pooling of blood outside the brain), severe retinal hemorrhage, coma or death, according to a study published in The Journal of Pediatrics. [More]
Novel device for mitral valve repair shows success in human study

Novel device for mitral valve repair shows success in human study

Researchers investigating a novel device to repair the mitral heart valve report 100 percent procedural success in a safety and performance study, the first such study done in humans. [More]
Aggressive home blood pressure monitoring may contribute to rise in emergency department visits

Aggressive home blood pressure monitoring may contribute to rise in emergency department visits

Visits to emergency departments for patients with hypertension increased by 64 percent between 2002 and 2012 while hospitalizations for those visits declined by 28 percent. [More]
Researchers develop conceptual model to improve acute care delivery and outcomes

Researchers develop conceptual model to improve acute care delivery and outcomes

Researchers at the George Washington University created a conceptual model for episodes of acute, unscheduled care - care that can be delivered in a variety of settings from emergency departments to doctors' offices, from urgent care centers to telemedicine. [More]
Physicians may need to allow sufficient time before predicting outcomes in comatose cardiac arrest patients

Physicians may need to allow sufficient time before predicting outcomes in comatose cardiac arrest patients

Physicians may be drawing conclusions too soon about survival outcomes of patients who suffered a cardiac arrest outside the hospital. [More]
Tablet-based system allows physicians to diagnose stroke patients in pre-hospital setting

Tablet-based system allows physicians to diagnose stroke patients in pre-hospital setting

A clinical trial testing mobile videoconferencing as a means for physicians to diagnose stroke patients while they're being transported to the hospital has found that a tablet-based system produced diagnoses highly correlating with a bedside assessment -- a finding that could have important implications for the early treatment of stroke and for preventing the disability it causes. [More]
CVD researchers to use minimally invasive tissue sampling to identify cause of child mortality

CVD researchers to use minimally invasive tissue sampling to identify cause of child mortality

The Center for Vaccine Development has been awarded a large grant for research that will help determine why so many children under five are dying in the world's poorest countries. [More]
Ways to prevent, treat skin irritations after contact with poisonous plants

Ways to prevent, treat skin irritations after contact with poisonous plants

Poisonous plants cause the most common allergic reactions to the skin, affecting as many as 50 million Americans each year, according to the American Skin Association. University of Alabama at Birmingham associate professor of Emergency Medicine, Walter Schrading, M.D., says it is important people are able to identify poisonous plants, prevent an allergic reaction and treat skin irritations after contact. [More]
Re-engineering cardiac scarring process could improve clinical outcomes for heart disease patients

Re-engineering cardiac scarring process could improve clinical outcomes for heart disease patients

Literal heartbreak, from illness or injury, triggers the body's natural healing mechanisms. [More]
New virtual reality simulator may help researchers learn more about ATV-related crashes

New virtual reality simulator may help researchers learn more about ATV-related crashes

A new virtual reality simulator will help University of Iowa researchers study how and why people lose control while driving all-terrain vehicles. [More]
VentureMed Group receives FDA 510(k) clearance for FLEX Scoring Catheter

VentureMed Group receives FDA 510(k) clearance for FLEX Scoring Catheter

VentureMed Group, Ltd., a medical device company based in northwest Ohio, has received 510(k) clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for the commercial distribution of a new surgical device for treating peripheral artery disease (PAD). [More]
ATACH-2 disputes intensive BP control benefits in acute ICH

ATACH-2 disputes intensive BP control benefits in acute ICH

Reducing systolic blood pressure to less than 140 mmHg has offered no benefits over standard care for patients with acute intracerebral haemorrhage in the ATACH-2 trial. [More]
Experts discuss new therapy options for stroke treatment at EAN Congress

Experts discuss new therapy options for stroke treatment at EAN Congress

There are more well-founded therapy options for the treatment of strokes than ever before. Care has to be reorganised before these innovations are actually used on patients. At the Congress of the European Academy of Neurology in Copenhagen, experts are discussing just how to do that successfully - from guidelines for the use of thrombectomy procedures all the way to the structure and expansion of stroke care units. [More]
Nutrition, safety tips for grilling season

Nutrition, safety tips for grilling season

Cooking meat, including beef, pork, fish, or poultry, with high-temperature methods such as pan frying or grilling directly over an open flame can increase exposure to chemicals that can cause changes in DNA that may increase the risk of cancer, according to the National Cancer Institute. [More]
Temple/St. Luke’s Medical School Grad honors 27 new physicians

Temple/St. Luke’s Medical School Grad honors 27 new physicians

During the four years of medical school training, students can either study, sleep or have a social life, but never all three, joked Joel Rosenfeld, MD, M.Ed, FACS, Chief Academic Officer, St. Luke's University Health Network, and Senior Associate Dean, Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University. [More]
Rural children have high rates of medical complexity

Rural children have high rates of medical complexity

Children in rural areas have high rates of medical complexity and often reside in low-income and medically underserved areas, according to researchers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. [More]
Jumping genes may play crucial role in generation of cancer

Jumping genes may play crucial role in generation of cancer

For more than 50 years, scientists have known of the existence of "jumping genes," strands of DNA material that can move from one location in the genome to another. [More]
New set of practice guidelines from WMS may help in treatment, prevention of drowning

New set of practice guidelines from WMS may help in treatment, prevention of drowning

Drowning is a global threat to human health. Each year, more than 372,000 people die as a result of drowning, with many of those deaths being preventable by simple water safety measures. In order to arm professionals with the most up-to-date clinical protocols, the Wilderness Medical Society has issued a new set of practice guidelines for both the treatment and prevention of drowning, published in the society's official journal, Wilderness and Environmental Medicine. [More]

High doses of Imodium to self-treat opioid addictions could be extremely dangerous

The over-the-counter anti-diarrhea medication Imodium, or its key ingredient loperamide, is increasingly being abused by people attempting to self-treat their opioid addiction, with sometime fatal results. [More]
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