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Diagnosing heart attacks in 1 hour: an interview with Dr Richard Body

Diagnosing heart attacks in 1 hour: an interview with Dr Richard Body

Cardiac troponin is a highly sensitive and specific biomarker for myocardial injury but concentrations in the blood rise over several hours after the onset of an acute myocardial infarction. [More]
One-dose of dexamethasone can improve outcomes of asthmatic patients in ER

One-dose of dexamethasone can improve outcomes of asthmatic patients in ER

Adults with asthma who were treated with one-dose dexamethasone in the emergency department had only slightly higher relapse than patients who were treated with a 5-day course of prednisone. [More]
Researchers observe worrisome increase in anaphylaxis rate

Researchers observe worrisome increase in anaphylaxis rate

Anaphylaxis, known to be a sudden and potentially life-threatening allergic reaction, seems to be increasing among children, according to a new study led by a team at the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre. [More]
Scientists identify key pathway that regulates 'switch' between wakefulness and sleep

Scientists identify key pathway that regulates 'switch' between wakefulness and sleep

Falling asleep and waking up are key transitions in everyone's day. Millions of people have trouble with these transitions - they find it hard to fall asleep or stay asleep at night, and hard to stay awake during the day. Despite decades of research, how these transitions work - the neurobiological mechanics of our circadian rhythm - has remained largely a mystery to brain scientists. [More]
Johns Hopkins study suggests updated universal screening for hepatitis C virus

Johns Hopkins study suggests updated universal screening for hepatitis C virus

A review of blood samples for nearly 5,000 patients seen at The Johns Hopkins Hospital Emergency Department suggests that federal guidelines for hepatitis C virus (HCV) screening may be missing up to a quarter of all cases and argues for updated universal screening. [More]
Inexpensive paper tape can help prevent incidence and frequency of foot blisters

Inexpensive paper tape can help prevent incidence and frequency of foot blisters

Ten years ago, Grant Lipman, MD, an emergency medicine physician, was working as a doctor for endurance athletes who were running 25 to 50 miles a day in various parts of the world, from China to Antarctica to Chile. [More]
Lung ultrasound may be highly effective, safe for diagnosing pneumonia in children

Lung ultrasound may be highly effective, safe for diagnosing pneumonia in children

Lung ultrasound has been shown to be highly effective and safe for diagnosing pneumonia in children and a potential substitute for chest X-ray, according to a study conducted at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. Results are currently published in the medical journal Chest. [More]
Resuscitation drugs along with defibrillation shocks can help stabilize heart beat after cardiac arrest

Resuscitation drugs along with defibrillation shocks can help stabilize heart beat after cardiac arrest

Administering heart resuscitation drugs to patients whose cardiac arrest is witnessed at the time of the attack can improve survival, but needs to be done through an IV line rather than directly into bone marrow as is more commonly done by paramedics, a new study involving UT Southwestern Medical Center emergency physicians and Dallas-Fort Worth Emergency Medical Services agencies reveals. [More]
New immune-suppressing therapy leads to longer survival for cross-species heart transplant

New immune-suppressing therapy leads to longer survival for cross-species heart transplant

A new immune-suppressing therapy has led to the longest survival yet for a cross-species heart transplant, according to new research conducted in part by researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. [More]
Patient's personal activity tracker, smartphone can help physicians treat new-onset atrial fibrillation

Patient's personal activity tracker, smartphone can help physicians treat new-onset atrial fibrillation

Emergency physicians used a patient's personal activity tracker and smartphone to identify the time his heart arrhythmia started, which allowed them to treat his new-onset atrial fibrillation with electrical cardioversion and discharge him home. [More]
New tool facilitates shared decision-making between physicians and patients with chest pain

New tool facilitates shared decision-making between physicians and patients with chest pain

Patients visiting a hospital emergency department with chest pain who engaged with their physician in shared decision-making using a tool called Chest Pain Choice showed improved knowledge of their health status and follow-up care options compared with patients who received standard counseling from a physician without the use of this decision aid, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 65th Annual Scientific Session. [More]
Patient-oriented tool helps shared decision-making between patients and physicians for chest pain

Patient-oriented tool helps shared decision-making between patients and physicians for chest pain

Patients who arrive at the emergency department with low-risk chest pain and talk through treatment options with a physician show improved knowledge of their health status and follow-up options, compared with patients who received standard counseling from a physician, according to Mayo Clinic research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 65th Annual Scientific Session. [More]
Researchers to study people over 100 years old in Acciaroli, Italy to unlock secrets of healthy aging

Researchers to study people over 100 years old in Acciaroli, Italy to unlock secrets of healthy aging

The average life expectancy in the United States is approximately 78 years old. Americans live longer, with better diets and improved health care, than ever before, but only 0.02 percent will hit the century mark. [More]
Simple blood test can help detect evidence of concussions up to 7 days after injury

Simple blood test can help detect evidence of concussions up to 7 days after injury

Researchers at Orlando Health detected evidence of concussions in patients up to 7 days after their injury using a simple blood test, according to a new study published in JAMA Neurology. The discovery could greatly expand the window for diagnosing concussions, especially in patients who experience a delayed onset of symptoms. [More]
Guardian system can predict risk of dangerous diseases

Guardian system can predict risk of dangerous diseases

If an infectious disease outbreak or an attack using an agent such as anthrax were to occur in Chicago, it most likely first will be noticed in emergency rooms throughout the city. Swift identification of the cause of an incoming patients' illness could be crucial to public health and safety personnel being able to intervene in time to save lives. [More]
Identification of elder abuse and neglect very crucial in emergency department

Identification of elder abuse and neglect very crucial in emergency department

When older adults in severely debilitated states show up for treatment in the emergency department, emergency physicians and staff must be able to identify and document their symptoms and decide whether to report their concerns to adult protective services. [More]
Innovative treatment may help prevent brain swelling, death in stroke patients

Innovative treatment may help prevent brain swelling, death in stroke patients

New research has provided more evidence that an innovative treatment strategy may help prevent brain swelling and death in stroke patients. J. Marc Simard, professor of neurosurgery at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, along with colleagues at Yale University and Massachusetts General Hospital, found that Cirara, an investigational drug, powerfully reduced brain swelling and death in patients who had suffered a type of large stroke called malignant infarction, which normally carries a high mortality rate. [More]
Drexel University researchers explore effective drug for treating established status epilepticus

Drexel University researchers explore effective drug for treating established status epilepticus

Drexel University College of Medicine researchers are conducting an emergency medicine study to find out the most effective drug for treating established status epilepticus -- a life-threatening condition in which the brain is in a state of persistent seizure. [More]
UCLA study finds better method to improve recovery, reduce spread of MRSA infection

UCLA study finds better method to improve recovery, reduce spread of MRSA infection

UCLA researchers have found that doctors can use a specific antibiotic in addition to surgically draining an abscess to give people a better chance of recovery. The discovery turns on its head the long-held notion that surgical drainage alone is sufficient for treating abscesses. [More]
FDA clearance expands clinical claims of Thermo Scientific B•R•A•H•M•S PCT biomarker for sepsis risk assessment

FDA clearance expands clinical claims of Thermo Scientific B•R•A•H•M•S PCT biomarker for sepsis risk assessment

Thermo Fisher Scientific Inc., the world leader in serving science, today announced it has received clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration that expands the clinical claims of the Thermo Scientific B·R·A·H·M·S PCT biomarker assay for sepsis risk assessment. [More]
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