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Emphysema is a debilitating disease that afflicts more than three million Americans. The disease is caused primarily by smoking and leads to a progressive, irreversible breakdown of lung tissue. This breakdown reduces the amount of lung tissue available for gas exchange and also impairs the lung's ability to inflate and deflate normally. As the disease advances, the most damaged areas of the lung over inflate within the chest cavity, trapping air and preventing the healthier lung areas from functioning normally. Eventually breathing becomes more difficult, leaving patients constantly feeling out-of-breath.
Getting drugs to bugs in NTM lung infections: an interview with Dr Jakko van Ingen

Getting drugs to bugs in NTM lung infections: an interview with Dr Jakko van Ingen

The first thing that is important to stress is that this is an area that we actually know very little about. What we generally think, rather than know, is that NTM has a lot in common with pulmonary tuberculosis. [More]
Deprived patients with chronic lung disease more likely to face malnutrition risk

Deprived patients with chronic lung disease more likely to face malnutrition risk

Patients with chronic lung disease living in deprived areas are more likely to be malnourished than those from wealthier postcodes, a QUT study has found. [More]
Barriers to internet use for self-care may be preventing women from managing chronic conditions

Barriers to internet use for self-care may be preventing women from managing chronic conditions

Barriers to internet use may be preventing chronically ill middle-aged and older women from being as healthy as they otherwise could be, new research from Oregon State University suggests. [More]
High daily doses of vitamin D can help reduce incidence of ARI in older, long-term care residents

High daily doses of vitamin D can help reduce incidence of ARI in older, long-term care residents

Researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus have found that high doses of vitamin D reduce the incidence of acute respiratory illness (ARI) in older, long-term care residents. [More]
New study finds two olfactory receptors in human lung tissue

New study finds two olfactory receptors in human lung tissue

It was always thought that olfactory receptors' sole bodily function was to smell, and could only be found inside a nose. [More]
Carotenoid pigment compound reduces invasiveness of tumors in mouse models of lung cancer

Carotenoid pigment compound reduces invasiveness of tumors in mouse models of lung cancer

Beta-cryptoxanthin (BCX), a carotenoid pigment compound found primarily in plants, reduces the number and invasiveness of tumors in mouse and cell models of lung cancer, report scientists from the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University. [More]
Home non-invasive ventilation for COPD: an interview with Dr Holger Woehrle

Home non-invasive ventilation for COPD: an interview with Dr Holger Woehrle

The key symptom of COPD is breathlessness, especially during daily activity, and the breathlessness is in addition to cough and chest tightness. The difficulty in managing this disease is that it's a disease that progresses with age. [More]
UIC researchers receive grant to study impact of diagnostic error on outcomes for pulmonary patients

UIC researchers receive grant to study impact of diagnostic error on outcomes for pulmonary patients

Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago have been awarded a $1.5 million grant from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality to study the impact of diagnostic error on outcomes for pulmonary patients and the use of lung-function testing in primary care. [More]
Managing low-risk acute care without hospitalization appears to be safe and reduces costs

Managing low-risk acute care without hospitalization appears to be safe and reduces costs

A comprehensive review of studies evaluating strategies for treating certain acute medical conditions without hospital admission finds that all four evaluated strategies appear to be safe, often improve patient and caregiver satisfaction, and reduce health care costs. [More]
Study explains long-term pulmonary outcomes among childhood cancer survivors

Study explains long-term pulmonary outcomes among childhood cancer survivors

A team of researchers from nine leading academic hospitals and research centers have published a paper in the early online edition of the journal Cancer that describes pulmonary outcomes among childhood cancer survivors. [More]
New disease gene linked to shortened telomeres appears to raise risk of pulmonary fibrosis-emphysema

New disease gene linked to shortened telomeres appears to raise risk of pulmonary fibrosis-emphysema

Johns Hopkins researchers say they have identified a new disease gene that, when mutated, appears to increase the risk in a small number of people of developing emphysema and a lung-scarring condition known as pulmonary fibrosis. [More]
High medical costs force many Australians to skip healthcare treatment

High medical costs force many Australians to skip healthcare treatment

New research shows one in four chronically ill Australians is skipping healthcare because of high costs. [More]
Testing lung health online: an interview with Professor Stephen Holgate

Testing lung health online: an interview with Professor Stephen Holgate

In our latest report – The Battle for Breath – the impact of lung disease in the UK, figures suggest that 1 in 5 (around 12.7 million) have been diagnosed with a lung condition in the UK. If you’re over the age of 70, this rises to 1 in 3. [More]
New lung-targeted gene therapy shows promise in improving treatment for emphysema

New lung-targeted gene therapy shows promise in improving treatment for emphysema

Researchers have developed a new strategy using lung-targeted gene therapy that may lead to improved treatments for inherited diseases including emphysema. [More]
E-cigarette use modifies gene expression important for upper airway immune defense

E-cigarette use modifies gene expression important for upper airway immune defense

When we smoke cigarettes, dozens of genes important for immune defense are altered in the epithelial cells that line the respiratory tract. Several of these changes likely increase the risk of bacterial infections, viruses, and inflammation. [More]
Women working long hours may be working themselves sick

Women working long hours may be working themselves sick

Research published this week shows that women working long hours for many years are at increased risk of developing life-threatening illnesses. Diabetes, cancer, heart trouble and arthritis were three times more common among women who worked an average of 60 hours or more per week for 30 years compared with women working fewer hours. [More]
Long work hours may triple risk of life-threatening illnesses in women

Long work hours may triple risk of life-threatening illnesses in women

Women who put in long hours for the bulk of their careers may pay a steep price: life-threatening illnesses, including heart disease and cancer. [More]
New RNA aptamer can prevent pathogenic protein misfolding

New RNA aptamer can prevent pathogenic protein misfolding

Several diseases occur when mutations cause misfolding of proteins. These include "serpinopathies" which is a group of rare heritable diseases. They are caused by mutations of so-called "serpin" inhibitors of proteolytic enzymes involved in blood coagulation, tissue remodeling, and other important physiological functions. [More]
Correcting defective p73 gene function may be promising therapeutic strategy for chronic lung diseases

Correcting defective p73 gene function may be promising therapeutic strategy for chronic lung diseases

Rising global air pollution and increasing smoking prevalence in many developing nations will likely lead to a growing incidence of lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), which currently affects more than 330 million people worldwide, is the third-leading cause of death and carries an estimated healthcare cost of $2.1 trillion. [More]
COPD exacerbations accelerate lung decline

COPD exacerbations accelerate lung decline

In patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), exacerbations accelerated lung function loss, according to a new study presented at the ATS 2016 International Conference. The effect was particularly prominent in those with mild disease. [More]
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