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Emphysema is a debilitating disease that afflicts more than three million Americans. The disease is caused primarily by smoking and leads to a progressive, irreversible breakdown of lung tissue. This breakdown reduces the amount of lung tissue available for gas exchange and also impairs the lung's ability to inflate and deflate normally. As the disease advances, the most damaged areas of the lung over inflate within the chest cavity, trapping air and preventing the healthier lung areas from functioning normally. Eventually breathing becomes more difficult, leaving patients constantly feeling out-of-breath.
E-cigarette use modifies gene expression important for upper airway immune defense

E-cigarette use modifies gene expression important for upper airway immune defense

When we smoke cigarettes, dozens of genes important for immune defense are altered in the epithelial cells that line the respiratory tract. Several of these changes likely increase the risk of bacterial infections, viruses, and inflammation. [More]
Women working long hours may be working themselves sick

Women working long hours may be working themselves sick

Research published this week shows that women working long hours for many years are at increased risk of developing life-threatening illnesses. Diabetes, cancer, heart trouble and arthritis were three times more common among women who worked an average of 60 hours or more per week for 30 years compared with women working fewer hours. [More]
Long work hours may triple risk of life-threatening illnesses in women

Long work hours may triple risk of life-threatening illnesses in women

Women who put in long hours for the bulk of their careers may pay a steep price: life-threatening illnesses, including heart disease and cancer. [More]
New RNA aptamer can prevent pathogenic protein misfolding

New RNA aptamer can prevent pathogenic protein misfolding

Several diseases occur when mutations cause misfolding of proteins. These include "serpinopathies" which is a group of rare heritable diseases. They are caused by mutations of so-called "serpin" inhibitors of proteolytic enzymes involved in blood coagulation, tissue remodeling, and other important physiological functions. [More]
Correcting defective p73 gene function may be promising therapeutic strategy for chronic lung diseases

Correcting defective p73 gene function may be promising therapeutic strategy for chronic lung diseases

Rising global air pollution and increasing smoking prevalence in many developing nations will likely lead to a growing incidence of lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), which currently affects more than 330 million people worldwide, is the third-leading cause of death and carries an estimated healthcare cost of $2.1 trillion. [More]
COPD exacerbations accelerate lung decline

COPD exacerbations accelerate lung decline

In patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), exacerbations accelerated lung function loss, according to a new study presented at the ATS 2016 International Conference. The effect was particularly prominent in those with mild disease. [More]
Boehringer Ingelheim presents new data on OFEV® (nintedanib) in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF)

Boehringer Ingelheim presents new data on OFEV® (nintedanib) in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF)

New analyses presented at the American Thoracic Society’s 2016 annual conference (ATS 2016) further add to the efficacy and safety profile of OFEV® (nintedanib) in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). [More]
Palovarotene drug may prevent multiple musculoskeletal problems linked with FOP

Palovarotene drug may prevent multiple musculoskeletal problems linked with FOP

New research in laboratory animals suggests that the drug palovarotene may prevent multiple skeletal problems caused by a rare but extremely disabling genetic bone disease, and may even be a candidate for use in newborn babies with the condition. [More]
Cigarette smoking, viral infections may reduce effectiveness of COPD symptom-reliever medication

Cigarette smoking, viral infections may reduce effectiveness of COPD symptom-reliever medication

New study backs up observations in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) patients showing reduced effectiveness of symptom-reliever medication (β2-adrenoceptor agonists) in flare-ups linked to cigarette smoking and infection with viruses such as influenza. [More]
U of M, RIT awarded $3 million grant to assess health information between deaf and hearing individuals

U of M, RIT awarded $3 million grant to assess health information between deaf and hearing individuals

Health information can be difficult to understand for anyone, but it is especially difficult for deaf individuals who may struggle with information and health care marginalization. This is a population with high rates of inadequate health literacy and health disparities. A grant from the National Institutes of Health's National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders is looking to change that. [More]
Prevalence of past-year generalized anxiety disorder much higher among older adults with COPD

Prevalence of past-year generalized anxiety disorder much higher among older adults with COPD

The prevalence of past-year generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) for adults aged 50 and older with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is much higher compared to older adults without COPD (5.8% vs 1.7%), according to a new study published by University of Toronto researchers. [More]
MUSC researchers receive $1.68 million NIH grant to study better treatment for chronic pancreatitis, diabetes

MUSC researchers receive $1.68 million NIH grant to study better treatment for chronic pancreatitis, diabetes

MUSC researchers received a $1.68 million National Institutes of Health grant to explore a better treatment for chronic pancreatitis, with the hopes that it also may shed light on a future cure for patients with type 1 diabetes. [More]
Study: Low-dose CT screening can reduce lung cancer mortality by 20% in high-risk population

Study: Low-dose CT screening can reduce lung cancer mortality by 20% in high-risk population

A national study involving 53,000 patients and 11 institutions (including Wake Forest Baptist) compared CT screens with chest X-rays and found that the scanning reduced lung cancer mortality by 20 percent in this high-risk population. [More]
Endoscopic submucosal dissection appears to be effective treatment for patients with throat cancer

Endoscopic submucosal dissection appears to be effective treatment for patients with throat cancer

According to a study in the December issue of GIE: Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, the monthly peer-reviewed scientific journal of the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) appears to be a safe and effective minimally invasive treatment for patients with superficial pharyngeal (throat) cancer. [More]
BTG receives 510k clearance for LC Bead LUMI

BTG receives 510k clearance for LC Bead LUMI

BTG plc, a global specialist healthcare company, today announced it has received 510k clearance from the US Food and Drug Administration for LC Bead LUMI, the first commercially available radiopaque embolic bead for the embolization of hypervascular tumors and arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). [More]
Preventable comorbidities common in cerebral palsy patients

Preventable comorbidities common in cerebral palsy patients

Medical comorbidities are common in patients with cerebral palsy and may impact on their mobility, report researchers. [More]
Novartis announces FDA approval of dual combination bronchodilator Utibron Neohaler for COPD patients

Novartis announces FDA approval of dual combination bronchodilator Utibron Neohaler for COPD patients

Novartis announced today that the US Food and Drug Administration has approved the dual combination bronchodilator Utibron Neohaler (indacaterol/glycopyrrolate) inhalation powder for the long-term maintenance treatment of airflow obstruction in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), including chronic bronchitis and/or emphysema. It is not indicated to treat asthma or sudden symptoms of COPD. [More]
Alaska pollock gelatin can be used to treat pulmonary diseases

Alaska pollock gelatin can be used to treat pulmonary diseases

In recent years, patients with pulmonary emphysema have been increasing mainly among middle-aged and elderly males due to aging and excessive smoking. Emphysema makes brittle lungs, and in severe cases, holes develop in the lung tissue, causing air leakage. Researchers at NIMS developed a new sealant to close holes developed in lungs and blood vessels using Alaska pollock gelatin. [More]
Henry Ford Hospital pulmonologist advocates for raising the smoking age to 21

Henry Ford Hospital pulmonologist advocates for raising the smoking age to 21

Henry Ford Hospital pulmonologist Daniel Ouellette, M.D., who during his 31-year career in medicine has seen the harmful effects of smoking on his patients, advocates for raising the smoking age to 21. [More]
Pitt investigators to lead $15 million federal initiative to manage breathing disorder clinical trials

Pitt investigators to lead $15 million federal initiative to manage breathing disorder clinical trials

The University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health and School of Medicine investigators will be leading a $15 million, five-year federal initiative to manage national clinical trials aimed at developing new treatments for breathing disorders. [More]
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