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Encephalitis is an acute inflammation of the brain.
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Mice, shrews are most effective at transferring Lyme disease and anaplasmosis

Mice, shrews are most effective at transferring Lyme disease and anaplasmosis

In the U.S., some 300,000 people are diagnosed with Lyme disease annually. Thousands also suffer from babesiosis and anaplasmosis, tick-borne ailments that can occur alone or as co-infections with Lyme disease. [More]
Canada funds 22 inventive ideas for improving health in low-resource countries

Canada funds 22 inventive ideas for improving health in low-resource countries

Grand Challenges Canada, funded by the Government of Canada, today announced $2.4 million in seed funds shared between 22 projects from Canada and nine developing nations, to pursue inventive new ideas for improving health in low-resource countries. [More]
Study reveals new invasion mechanism of Enterovirus 71

Study reveals new invasion mechanism of Enterovirus 71

A new study determines glycosylation and pH-dependent conformational changes of virus receptor SCARB2 as crucial for EV71 attachment, entry and uncoating. [More]
Viewpoints: Misreading Hobby Lobby; calmer climate for ACA; danger of tuberculosis, measles

Viewpoints: Misreading Hobby Lobby; calmer climate for ACA; danger of tuberculosis, measles

Liberals should spend less time lauding the dissents in last week's Hobby Lobby decision by the U.S. Supreme Court and more time reading them. [More]
Tips to protect children from summer bugs

Tips to protect children from summer bugs

Mike Gittelman, MD, Co-Director, Comprehensive Children's Injury Center and the experts at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center want to make sure that families and children stay safe while playing outdoors this summer. [More]
Ebola research: an interview with Professor Easton, University of Warwick

Ebola research: an interview with Professor Easton, University of Warwick

Ebola virus belongs to a group of viruses that have been known for some time. It was first isolated as a result of an infection in a primate, in a monkey colony, in monkeys that were being used for research in the Philippines. [More]
Bristol-Myers Squibb to present new immunotherapy study data at ASCO Annual Meeting

Bristol-Myers Squibb to present new immunotherapy study data at ASCO Annual Meeting

Bristol-Myers Squibb Company today announced that new data from studies investigating its immunotherapies in adjuvant and advanced melanoma, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) will be presented at the 50th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) in Chicago from May 30-June 3. [More]
New Ebola variant identified in Guinea

New Ebola variant identified in Guinea

Performed in less than a month, sequencing of the complete genome and subsequent phylogenetic analysis show that the virus present in Guinea forms a clade (variant) that is distinct from strains previously identified in the Democratic Republic of Congo and in Gabon. Epidemiological investigations also linked the laboratory confirmed cases with the initial deaths recorded during the December 2013 outbreak. [More]
New research may help scientists develop treatments or vaccines for Dengue fever

New research may help scientists develop treatments or vaccines for Dengue fever

Two recent papers by a University of Colorado School of Medicine researcher and colleagues may help scientists develop treatments or vaccines for Dengue fever, West Nile virus, Yellow fever, Japanese encephalitis and other disease-causing flaviviruses. [More]

DEP awards nearly $2.1 million in West Nile Virus grants to 26 counties

The Department of Environmental Protection today announced it is awarding nearly $2.1 million in West Nile Virus (WNV) Control Program Grants to 26 counties. [More]
Herpes simplex viral therapy in conjunction with radiation proves effective in treating malignant gliomas

Herpes simplex viral therapy in conjunction with radiation proves effective in treating malignant gliomas

Researchers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham report a genetically engineered herpes simplex viral therapy is safe when used in conjunction with radiation in the treatment of malignant gliomas, one of the most deadly forms of brain cancer. [More]
TSRI scientists receive $2.3M to study viruses that cause tropical diseases

TSRI scientists receive $2.3M to study viruses that cause tropical diseases

The outbreak of dengue fever that infected some 20 people in Florida's Martin County late last year unnerved many who feared the tropical disease had once again established a foothold in Florida. The last outbreaks occurred in 2009 and 2010 in Key West—before that, the disease hadn't struck Florida in more than 70 years. [More]
Researchers discover potential treatment for viral infection that causes illnesses in children

Researchers discover potential treatment for viral infection that causes illnesses in children

Researchers have discovered a potential treatment for a viral infection that causes potentially fatal brain swelling and paralysis in children. The findings also point to possible treatments for related viruses including those that cause "common cold" symptoms. [More]
NPS MedicineWise urges parents to ensure that children's vaccinations are up to date

NPS MedicineWise urges parents to ensure that children's vaccinations are up to date

Following a recent spate of measles cases being reported in a number of Australian states, NPS MedicineWise is reminding parents to check whether their children’s immunisations are up to date before they head back to school next week. [More]
UT Southwestern' faculty receives Stanley J. Korsmeyer Award for contributions to understanding of autophagy

UT Southwestern' faculty receives Stanley J. Korsmeyer Award for contributions to understanding of autophagy

Dr. Beth Levine, a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator and Director of the Center for Autophagy Research at UT Southwestern Medical Center, has received the 2014 Stanley J. Korsmeyer Award from the American Society for Clinical Investigation. [More]
GSK's FluLaval Quadrivalent vaccine effective in reducing flu cases in children

GSK's FluLaval Quadrivalent vaccine effective in reducing flu cases in children

GlaxoSmithKline plc announced today that a peer-reviewed study issued online by the New England Journal of Medicine has reported that GSK's FluLaval® Quadrivalent reduced flu cases among children ages 3-8 by 55.4% overall and lowered the risk of developing moderate-to-serious flu illness by 73.1%. [More]
Emergent BioSolutions enters into definitive agreement to acquire Cangene

Emergent BioSolutions enters into definitive agreement to acquire Cangene

Emergent BioSolutions Inc.announced that it has entered into a definitive agreement with Cangene Corporation (TSX: CNJ) under which Emergent will acquire all of the outstanding common shares of Cangene in an all-cash transaction valued at $3.24 per share on a fully diluted basis for an aggregate purchase price of $222 million. [More]
Advanced cytotoxins help bacteria survive antibiotics treatment

Advanced cytotoxins help bacteria survive antibiotics treatment

In spite of the fact that the first antibiotics were discovered almost a century ago, infectious diseases such as tuberculosis, encephalitis and meningitis are still serious diseases for humans in the twenty-first century. The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that there are more than 8 million new cases of tuberculosis per year on a global scale, and that more than 300,000 of these are due to multidrug-resistant strains that are not only difficult to treat, but are also emerging rapidly in regions such as Eastern Europe. [More]
WHO prequalifies affordable vaccine to protect children against Japanese encephalitis

WHO prequalifies affordable vaccine to protect children against Japanese encephalitis

An affordable vaccine to protect children against deadly Japanese encephalitis has been prequalified by the World Health Organization, paving the way to reach millions more children across Asia at risk for the disease. [More]

WHO approves new Japanese encephalitis vaccine to protect children in developing countries

A newly accessible vaccine against Japanese encephalitis (JE) is going to make the protection of more children in developing countries easier. The vaccine, manufactured in China, only needs to be given in one dose, it can be used for infants, and it is less expensive than other Japanese encephalitis vaccines. [More]