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Lilly receives FDA approval for CYRAMZA (ramucirumab)

Lilly receives FDA approval for CYRAMZA (ramucirumab)

Eli Lilly and Company has received its third U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval for CYRAMZA (ramucirumab). [More]
Bayer, DNDi sign first agreement to develop new oral treatment for onchocerciasis

Bayer, DNDi sign first agreement to develop new oral treatment for onchocerciasis

Bayer HealthCare and the Drugs for Neglected Diseases initiative (DNDi) have signed an agreement under which Bayer will provide the active ingredient emodepside to support DNDi in its effort to develop a new oral drug to treat river blindness (or onchocerciasis). The world's second leading infectious cause of blindness, river blindness is a neglected tropical disease caused by a filarial worm. [More]
Amgen announces new data from BLINCYTO Phase 2 study for treatment of patients with ALL

Amgen announces new data from BLINCYTO Phase 2 study for treatment of patients with ALL

Amgen today announced that new data from a pivotal Phase 2 study evaluating BLINCYTO (blinatumomab) for the treatment of adult patients with relapsed/refractory B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) was presented at the 56th American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting and Exposition. [More]
Study provides insights into genetic underpinnings of childhood epilepsies

Study provides insights into genetic underpinnings of childhood epilepsies

Technological advances in genetic analysis have uncovered changes in single genes that account for a surprising number of infantile and early-childhood epilepsies. Though some of the affected genes have been identified, the physical manifestations of these alterations remain largely uncharacterized. [More]
UB researchers explore link between behavioral symptoms and chronic traumatic encephalopathy

UB researchers explore link between behavioral symptoms and chronic traumatic encephalopathy

Aggression, violence, depression, suicide. Media reports routinely link these behavioral symptoms with chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), the neurodegenerative brain disease, in former football players. [More]
AGA's journals highlight important updates into treatments for cirrhosis, NAFLD

AGA's journals highlight important updates into treatments for cirrhosis, NAFLD

Cirrhosis and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) are two serious liver conditions with limited pharmacological treatments. The December issues of AGA's journals -- Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology and Gastroenterology -- highlight important updates into treatments for these two debilitating diseases. [More]
Researchers discover new genetic cause of rare, complex form of epilepsy

Researchers discover new genetic cause of rare, complex form of epilepsy

A research team led by scientists at the Scripps Translational Science Institute has used whole genome sequencing to identify a new genetic cause of a severe, rare and complex form of epilepsy that becomes evident in early childhood and can lead to early death. [More]
D-LIVER project aims to help patients with chronic liver disease

D-LIVER project aims to help patients with chronic liver disease

A European ICT for Health project aims to improve the quality of life of patients with chronic liver disease, by developing a remote support system to monitor their condition at home. [More]
FDA approves CYRAMZA in combination with paclitaxel for advanced adenocarcinoma

FDA approves CYRAMZA in combination with paclitaxel for advanced adenocarcinoma

Eli Lilly and Company announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved CYRAMZA (ramucirumab) in combination with paclitaxel (a type of chemotherapy) as a treatment for people with advanced or metastatic gastric (stomach) or gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) adenocarcinoma whose cancer has progressed on or after prior fluoropyrimidine- or platinum-containing chemotherapy. [More]
Common drug could become the future standard of care for HE patients

Common drug could become the future standard of care for HE patients

A common drug used to clean a person's bowels before a colonoscopy could become the future standard of care for patients with acute hepatic encephalopathy (HE), a mental disorientation problem that affects up to one in two cirrhosis patients. [More]
Cypher researchers identify new genetic cause of severe epileptic encephalopathy

Cypher researchers identify new genetic cause of severe epileptic encephalopathy

Cypher Genomics, Inc., the genome informatics company, announced today the identification of de novo KCNB1 missense mutations as a novel genetic cause of severe epileptic encephalopathy. Cypher’s co-founder and Chief Scientific Officer Ali Torkamani, Ph.D. reviewed the data today at a platform presentation at the ASHG 2014 meeting being held October 18 to 22 in San Diego. [More]
Ramucirumab Phase III study meets primary endpoint in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer

Ramucirumab Phase III study meets primary endpoint in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer

Eli Lilly and Company today announced that the RAISE trial, a Phase III study of ramucirumab (CYRAMZA) in combination with chemotherapy in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC), met its primary endpoint of overall survival. [More]
More research needed to prevent brains of sportspeople from injury

More research needed to prevent brains of sportspeople from injury

Two University of Birmingham academics are calling for more research to be carried out looking at how the brains of sportspeople - including children - react when they receive a blow to the head. [More]
EPO administered to preterm infants linked with reduced risk of brain injury

EPO administered to preterm infants linked with reduced risk of brain injury

High-dose erythropoietin (EPO; a hormone) administered within 42 hours of birth to preterm infants was associated with a reduced risk of brain injury, as indicated by magnetic resonance imaging, according to a study in the August 27 issue of JAMA. [More]
Infectious prion protein is marker for variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

Infectious prion protein is marker for variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

The misfolded and infectious prion protein that is a marker for variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease - linked to the consumption of infected cattle meat - has been detected in the urine of patients with the disease by researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) Medical School. [More]
Scientists find high proportion of oral bacteria in gut microbiota of liver cirrhosis patients

Scientists find high proportion of oral bacteria in gut microbiota of liver cirrhosis patients

Scientists from INRA in collaboration with a Chinese team found that the gut microbiota[1] of individuals with liver cirrhosis differ notably from healthy individuals', showing a high proportion of oral bacteria. [More]

Scientists work to detect chronic traumatic encephalopathy in earliest stages

Autopsies have shown that some high-profile athletes who suffered repeated blows to the head during their careers have unusual protein clumps in their brains. [More]
Zhichan decoction promotes dopaminergic neurons following NSC transplantation in PD rats

Zhichan decoction promotes dopaminergic neurons following NSC transplantation in PD rats

There is an increasing interest in Parkinson's disease (PD) treatment by increasing dopamine content and reducing dopaminergic metabolites in the brain. [More]
Kaleo announces U.S. availability of EVZIO for emergency treatment of opioid overdose

Kaleo announces U.S. availability of EVZIO for emergency treatment of opioid overdose

Kaleo, a privately-held pharmaceutical company headquartered in Richmond, Virginia, today announced the United States (U.S.) commercial availability of EVZIO for the emergency treatment of known or suspected opioid overdose, as manifested by respiratory and/or central nervous system depression. [More]
Telemedicine could improve quality of life of patients with chronic liver diseases

Telemedicine could improve quality of life of patients with chronic liver diseases

Although telemedicine could improve the quality of life of patients with chronic liver diseases, viable home care systems are still lacking. Scientists working on the EU-project "d-LIVER" mean to remedy this situation. Initial results have now been released. [More]