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New research provides new hope for liver transplant patients with recurring hepatitis C

New research announced at the International Liver CongressTM 2014 today provides new hope for the notoriously difficult-to-treat population of liver transplant patients with recurring hepatitis C (HCV). [More]

Study shows impact of hepatic encephalopathy on liver disease patients

New data presented today at the International Liver Congress show the impact of hepatic encephalopathy on liver disease patients and healthcare systems. [More]

Novel prediction model improves patient outcomes after paracetamol-induced acute liver failure

In the UK paracetamol toxicity is the most common cause of ALF and has a high mortality rate. It is estimated that 150 to 200 deaths and 15 to 20 LTs occur as a result of poisoning each year in England and Wales. [More]
FDA expands age indication of Adacel vaccine for immunization against tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis

FDA expands age indication of Adacel vaccine for immunization against tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis

Sanofi Pasteur, the vaccines division of Sanofi, announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has expanded the approved age indication of Adacel® (Tetanus Toxoid, Reduced Diphtheria Toxoid and Acellular Pertussis Vaccine Adsorbed; Tdap) for active booster immunization for the prevention of tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis as a single dose in persons 10 through 64 years of age. [More]

Leading researchers to convene at 4th Annual Traumatic Brain Injury Conference

The world's leading researchers in the field of traumatic brain injury research are meeting on April 16 & 17, 2014 in Washington DC for the 4th Annual Traumatic Brain Injury Conference. [More]

Low levels of sodium prior to liver transplantation do not increase risk of death, say researchers

Researchers report that low levels of sodium, known as hyponatremia, prior to transplantation does not increase the risk of death following liver transplant. Full findings are published in Liver Transplantation, a journal of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases and the International Liver Transplantation Society. [More]
Experts in brain and spinal cord injuries to discuss treatment approaches at 23rd Annual Meeting of AMSSM

Experts in brain and spinal cord injuries to discuss treatment approaches at 23rd Annual Meeting of AMSSM

Post-concussion syndrome (PCS) and spinal cord injuries are complex problems that can present with a variety of symptoms or sequelae. [More]
New treatment could halt progression of dementia

New treatment could halt progression of dementia

Researchers at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston have discovered a way to potentially halt the progression of dementia caused by accumulation of a protein known as tau. [More]
Sports medicine physicians to convene at 2014 AMSSM Annual Meeting

Sports medicine physicians to convene at 2014 AMSSM Annual Meeting

More than 1,400 sports medicine physicians from the United States and abroad will attend the 23rd Annual Meeting of the American Medical Society for Sports Medicine (AMSSM), the largest primary care sports medicine physician organization in the nation. [More]
Three innovative tools to detect, test and initiate personalized drug treatment for seizures

Three innovative tools to detect, test and initiate personalized drug treatment for seizures

A team of researchers from the National Institutes of Health, Emory University and Cedars-Sinai - specialists in identifying and treating very rare diseases - used three innovative tools to detect a previously unknown gene mutation, test potential therapies in the lab, and initiate personalized drug treatment for a boy with a lifelong history of uncontrollable seizures that caused significant impact on his cognitive and social development. [More]
Penn researchers use mathematical modeling to better understand mechanisms in TBI

Penn researchers use mathematical modeling to better understand mechanisms in TBI

Even the mildest form of a traumatic brain injury, better known as a concussion, can deal permanent, irreparable damage. Now, an interdisciplinary team of researchers at the University of Pennsylvania is using mathematical modeling to better understand the mechanisms at play in this kind of injury, with an eye toward protecting the brain from its long-term consequences. [More]
New study uses Lumosity games to detect subtle cognitive impairments in patients with cirrhosis

New study uses Lumosity games to detect subtle cognitive impairments in patients with cirrhosis

A new study from the University of Washington has found that performance on Lumosity games can distinguish between patients with cirrhosis of the liver, pre-cirrhotic patients, and healthy controls. The study used Lumosity games as psychometric tests to detect subtle cognitive impairments in patients with cirrhosis. The study is published in the March issue of the American Journal of Gastroenterology. [More]
UT Southwestern Medical Center opens new Texas Institute for Brain Injury and Repair

UT Southwestern Medical Center opens new Texas Institute for Brain Injury and Repair

UT Southwestern Medical Center today launched the new Texas Institute for Brain Injury and Repair, a state-funded initiative to promote innovative research and education, with the goals of accelerating translation into better diagnosis and revolutionizing care for millions of people who suffer brain injuries each year. [More]

Phase 2 trial results show GPB reduces hepatic encephalopathy episodes in patients with cirrhosis

Phase 2 trial results published in the March issue of Hepatology, a journal of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases, suggests the potential for Glycerol Phenylbutyrate (GPB) to reduce hepatic encephalopathy episodes in patients with cirrhosis, with a safety profile similar to placebo. [More]

Upstream interventions may provide options to contain emerging pathogens at source

While many endemic infectious diseases of humans have been largely contained, new microbes continue to emerge to threaten human and animal health. [More]
Scientists measure how well football helmet designs protected against traumatic brain injury

Scientists measure how well football helmet designs protected against traumatic brain injury

A new study finds that football helmets currently used on the field may do little to protect against hits to the side of the head, or rotational force, an often dangerous source of brain injury and encephalopathy. [More]
Loyola University neuropsychologist find little evidence that chronic traumatic encephalopathy actually exists

Loyola University neuropsychologist find little evidence that chronic traumatic encephalopathy actually exists

The media have widely reported that a debilitating neurological condition called chronic traumatic encephalopathy is a well-established disease in retired athletes who played football and other contact sports. [More]

UM professors receive grant to help athletes, military members suffering from traumatic brain injury

Athletes, members of the military and others suffering from traumatic brain injury may benefit from research conducted by two University of Montana faculty members through a new $300,000 grant awarded by General Electric Co. and the National Football League. [More]
Collaboration between NFL and GE seeks to improve safety of athletes, soldiers who sustain mild TBI

Collaboration between NFL and GE seeks to improve safety of athletes, soldiers who sustain mild TBI

​When the Broncos and the Seahawks meet on the gridiron for Superbowl XLVIII, player and team statistics - passer ratings, rushing yards, sacks and fumbles - will be tossed around like, well, a football. [More]

Researchers discover new gene involved in severe childhood epilepsy

A European consortium of epilepsy researchers has reported the discovery of a new gene involved in severe childhood epilepsy. Using a novel combination of technologies, including trio exome sequencing of patient/parental DNA and genetic studies in the tiny larvae of zebrafish, the EuroEPINOMICS RES consortium found that mutations in the gene CHD2 are responsible for a subset of epilepsy patients with symptoms similar to Dravet syndrome - a severe form of childhood epilepsy that is in many patients resistant to currently available anti-epileptic drugs. [More]