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Blood-brain barrier following stoke prevents harmful substances entering brain

Blood-brain barrier following stoke prevents harmful substances entering brain

Following ischemic stroke, the integrity of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which prevents harmful substances such as inflammatory molecules from entering the brain, can be impaired in cerebral areas distant from initial ischemic insult. [More]
ChromaTrap™ Chromatin Immunoprecipitation technology receives positive commentary in published paper

ChromaTrap™ Chromatin Immunoprecipitation technology receives positive commentary in published paper

Porvair Sciences reports on positive commentary by researchers in published papers citing how using the fast, sensitive ChromaTrap™ Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP) technology has benefited their research. [More]
Scientists engineered microchip coated with blood vessel cells to study cardiovascular nanomedicine

Scientists engineered microchip coated with blood vessel cells to study cardiovascular nanomedicine

Designing nanomedicine to combat diseases is a hot area of scientific research, primarily for treating cancer, but very little is known in the context of atherosclerotic disease. [More]
Selective FAK inhibition within endothelial cells prevents spontaneous tumor metastasis

Selective FAK inhibition within endothelial cells prevents spontaneous tumor metastasis

A team of scientists, led by principal investigator David D. Schlaepfer, PhD, a professor in the Department of Reproductive Medicine at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, has found that a protein involved in promoting tumor growth and survival is also activated in surrounding blood vessels, enabling cancer cells to spread into the bloodstream. [More]
Study reveals how exercise linked to improved outcomes for men with prostate cancer

Study reveals how exercise linked to improved outcomes for men with prostate cancer

Men who walked at a fast pace prior to a prostate cancer diagnosis had more regularly shaped blood vessels in their prostate tumors compared with men who walked slowly, providing a potential explanation for why exercise is linked to improved outcomes for men with prostate cancer, according to results presented here at the AACR-Prostate Cancer Foundation Conference on Advances in Prostate Cancer Research, held Jan. 18-21. [More]
Higher levels of physical activity reduces risk of prostate cancer recurrence, mortality

Higher levels of physical activity reduces risk of prostate cancer recurrence, mortality

Men who walked at a fast pace prior to a prostate cancer diagnosis had more regularly shaped blood vessels in their prostate tumors compared with men who walked slowly, providing a potential explanation for why exercise is linked to improved outcomes for men with prostate cancer, according to results presented here at the AACR-Prostate Cancer Foundation Conference on Advances in Prostate Cancer Research, held Jan. 18-21. [More]

TSRI researchers develop new fluid biopsy technique to identify patients at high risk of heart attack

A new "fluid biopsy" technique that could identify patients at high risk of a heart attack by identifying specific cells as markers in the bloodstream has been developed by a group of researchers at The Scripps Research Institute. [More]

CotH protein mediates fungal invasion of host cells during mucormycosis

Opportunistic infection of individuals on immunosuppressive therapy are a major problem for patient outcome, despite current prophylactic strategies. [More]
Circulating nucleosomes and colorectal cancer diagnostics: an interview with Dr. Stefan Holdenrieder, University Hospital Bonn

Circulating nucleosomes and colorectal cancer diagnostics: an interview with Dr. Stefan Holdenrieder, University Hospital Bonn

For my MD thesis I modified and evaluated an immunological assay that detected the cell death products “nucleosomes” as a new blood-based cancer biomarker. As cell death processes are enhanced or suppressed during different stages of tumor development, it was assumed that they may enable stage-dependent detection of cancer disease. [More]
Study shows most corneal transplants have remarkable longevity regardless of donor age

Study shows most corneal transplants have remarkable longevity regardless of donor age

Ten years after a transplant, a cornea from a 71-year-old donor is likely to remain as healthy as a cornea from a donor half that age, and corneas from donors over 71 perform slightly less well but still remain healthy for most transplant recipients, according to a study funded by the National Eye Institute (NEI) and led by the UC Davis Health System Eye Center and the University of Cincinnati Eye Institut [More]
Rice U. researchers link von Willebrand factor to heart-valve calcium deposits

Rice U. researchers link von Willebrand factor to heart-valve calcium deposits

Heart valves calcify over time, and Rice University scientists are beginning to understand why. The Rice lab of bioengineer Jane Grande-Allen found through studies of pigs' heart valves that age plays a critical role in the valves' progressive hardening, and the problem may be due to the infiltration of a protein known as von Willebrand factor. [More]
Promising technique for treating eye disease proves effective in preclinical studies

Promising technique for treating eye disease proves effective in preclinical studies

A promising technique for treating human eye disease has proven effective in preclinical studies and may lead to new treatments to prevent blindness, according to experiments conducted at The Scripps Research Institute in La Jolla, California. [More]
Studies suggest infusion of blood vessel cells may contribute to organ regeneration in future

Studies suggest infusion of blood vessel cells may contribute to organ regeneration in future

Damaged or diseased organs may someday be healed with an injection of blood vessel cells, eliminating the need for donated organs and transplants, according to scientists at Weill Cornell Medical College. [More]
Psoriasis and the nervous system: an interview with Dr Nicole Ward, Case Western Reserve University

Psoriasis and the nervous system: an interview with Dr Nicole Ward, Case Western Reserve University

The prevalence of skin disease exceeds that of obesity, hypertension or cancer. One in three individuals in the United States suffers with a skin disease, with ~2-3% of the American population suffering from psoriasis. [More]

IBN researchers one step closer to viable tissue replacements

Researchers at the Institute of Bioengineering and Nanotechnology have developed a simple method of organizing cells and their microenvironments in hydrogel fibers. Their unique technology provides a feasible template for assembling complex structures, such as liver and fat tissues, as described in their recent publication in Nature Communications. [More]
Hydrogel method form synthetic scaffolds to support formation of blood vessels in engineered tissues

Hydrogel method form synthetic scaffolds to support formation of blood vessels in engineered tissues

Next-generation hydrogels can form synthetic scaffolds to support the formation of replacement tissues and organs in the emerging area of regenerative medicine. Embedding peptides into the hydrogels stimulates the growth of essential microvascular networks to ensure a good blood supply. [More]
Curing type 1 diabetes: an interview with Dr. Habib Zaghouani, MU School of Medicine

Curing type 1 diabetes: an interview with Dr. Habib Zaghouani, MU School of Medicine

Type 1 diabetes is an attack by the immune system of the islet of Langerhans within the pancreas. Basically, the islet of Langerhans harbor beta cells, which produce insulin and when the islets are attacked, the beta cells destruct and there is no more insulin. When the insulin level goes low, blood glucose levels go high and that creates a problem. [More]
New research reveals how endothelium maintains highly efficient barrier function

New research reveals how endothelium maintains highly efficient barrier function

The endothelium, the cellular layer lining the body's blood vessels, is extremely resilient. Measuring just a few hundred nanometers in thickness, this super-tenuous structure routinely withstands blood flow, hydrostatic pressure, stretch and tissue compression to create a unique and highly dynamic barrier that maintains the organization necessary to partition tissues from the body's circulatory system. [More]

Massachusetts hospital performs first cornea transplant with pre-loaded donor tissue

The first successful cornea transplant with donor endothelial tissue preloaded by an eye bank has been performed at Massachusetts Eye and Ear in Boston, Mass. Roberto Pineda II, M.D., Director of the Refractive Surgery Service at Mass. Eye and Ear, and an Associate Professor of Ophthalmology at Harvard Medical School, recently performed the groundbreaking transplant. [More]
UC Davis scientists find mechanism in metabolized omega-3 fatty acid that helps combat cancer

UC Davis scientists find mechanism in metabolized omega-3 fatty acid that helps combat cancer

A team of UC Davis scientists has found that a product resulting from a metabolized omega-3 fatty acid helps combat cancer by cutting off the supply of oxygen and nutrients that fuel tumor growth and spread of the disease. [More]