Epilepsy News and Research RSS Feed - Epilepsy News and Research Twitter

Epilepsy is a group of disorders marked by problems in the normal functioning of the brain. These problems can produce seizures, unusual body movements, a loss of consciousness or changes in consciousness, as well as mental problems or problems with the senses.
Powerful explosive devices of 21st century warfare prompt urgent calls to re-engineer protective gear

Powerful explosive devices of 21st century warfare prompt urgent calls to re-engineer protective gear

Battle-inflicted head injuries are as old as war itself, evidenced by the copper helmets worn by Bronze Age soldiers to deflect blows from spears and axes. Over the ensuing millennia, as weapons evolved, so did armor. Today, the powerful explosive devices of 21st century warfare have once again raised the stakes, prompting urgent calls to re-engineer protective gear. [More]
Dementia sufferers may begin to lose awareness of memory problems 2-3 years before onset

Dementia sufferers may begin to lose awareness of memory problems 2-3 years before onset

People who will develop dementia may begin to lose awareness of their memory problems two to three years before the actual onset of the disease, according to a new study published in the August 26, 2015, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
BET inhibitors can cause molecular changes in neurons, lead to memory loss in mice

BET inhibitors can cause molecular changes in neurons, lead to memory loss in mice

Cancer researchers are constantly in search of more-effective and less-toxic approaches to stopping the disease, and have recently launched clinical trials testing a new class of drugs called BET inhibitors. These therapies act on a group of proteins that help regulate the expression of many genes, some of which play a role in cancer. [More]
Understanding the causes of sudden death in epilepsy: an interview with Professor Sanjay Sisodiya

Understanding the causes of sudden death in epilepsy: an interview with Professor Sanjay Sisodiya

SUDEP is the sudden unexpected witnessed or unwitnessed, non-traumatic and non-drowning death in people with epilepsy, with or without evidence of a seizure. It doesn’t necessarily have to be in the known context of a seizure, excluding documented status epilepticus, where people have seizure after seizure. [More]
Hippocampus in the brain's temporal lobe involved in quick, successful conflict resolution

Hippocampus in the brain's temporal lobe involved in quick, successful conflict resolution

The hippocampus in the brain's temporal lobe is responsible for more than just long-term memory. Researchers have for the first time demonstrated that it is also involved in quick and successful conflict resolution. [More]
Cyberonics, Sorin provide update on pending business combination

Cyberonics, Sorin provide update on pending business combination

Cyberonics, Inc. and Sorin S.p.A. today announced an update on various matters relating to their pending business combination (the "Transaction"). [More]
Cyberonics reports record worldwide net sales of $81.0 million for first fiscal quarter 2016

Cyberonics reports record worldwide net sales of $81.0 million for first fiscal quarter 2016

Cyberonics, Inc. today announced results for the quarter ended July 24, 2015. [More]
Kentucky, Oklahoma and Rhode Island researchers awarded NSF grant to develop innovative brain imaging technologies

Kentucky, Oklahoma and Rhode Island researchers awarded NSF grant to develop innovative brain imaging technologies

The National Science Foundation has awarded $6 million to researchers in Kentucky, Oklahoma and Rhode Island to develop innovative and broadly accessible brain imaging technologies to provide insight into how the nervous system functions in health and disease. [More]
Stress hormone cortisol tied to thinking problems in healthy older people

Stress hormone cortisol tied to thinking problems in healthy older people

Testing the saliva of healthy older people for the level of the stress hormone cortisol may help identify individuals who should be screened for problems with thinking skills, according to a study published in the August 19, 2015, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Rice and UTHealth scientists awarded $1.02 million NSF grant to examine how the brain processes language

Rice and UTHealth scientists awarded $1.02 million NSF grant to examine how the brain processes language

The National Science Foundation has awarded a $1.02 million grant to scientists at Rice University and the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston Medical School to study how the brain processes language. The joint research may one day help people who lose the ability to communicate. [More]
Northwestern University researchers identify molecular difference in male and female brains

Northwestern University researchers identify molecular difference in male and female brains

Male and female brains operate differently at a molecular level, a Northwestern University research team reports in a new study of a brain region involved in learning and memory, responses to stress and epilepsy. [More]
Study suggests that eye movements during REM sleep responsible for resetting dream 'snapshots'

Study suggests that eye movements during REM sleep responsible for resetting dream 'snapshots'

Rapid Eye Movement (REM) sleep, the period in which we experience vivid dreams, was discovered by scientists in the 1950s. Because REM sleep is associated with dreaming, on the one hand, and eye movement, on the other, it has been tempting to assume that each movement of the eye is associated with a specific dream image. But despite decades of intense research by leading international scientists, this intuitive hypothesis has remained unproven. [More]
Regular exercise benefits children with multiple sclerosis

Regular exercise benefits children with multiple sclerosis

A new study suggests children with multiple sclerosis (MS) who exercise regularly may have a less active disease. The research is published in the August 12, 2015, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
FDA accepts sNDA to review Brintellix clinical trial data for treatment of major depressive disorder

FDA accepts sNDA to review Brintellix clinical trial data for treatment of major depressive disorder

Takeda Pharmaceutical Company Limited (Takeda) and H. Lundbeck A/S (Lundbeck) announced today the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has accepted a supplemental New Drug Application (sNDA) for review to add clinical data regarding the effect of Brintellix (vortioxetine) on certain aspects of cognitive function in adults with Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) to the current product label. [More]
UNC researchers show how a genetic mutation disables molecular switch and causes autism

UNC researchers show how a genetic mutation disables molecular switch and causes autism

Last December, researchers identified more than 1,000 gene mutations in individuals with autism, but how these mutations increased risk for autism was unclear. Now, UNC School of Medicine researchers are the first to show how one of these mutations disables a molecular switch in one of these genes and causes autism. [More]

First drug produced by 3D printing is approved by FDA

Levetiracetam manufactured using three-dimensional (3D) printing has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of epilepsy. [More]
Antiepileptic monotherapy does not increase intrauterine death risk

Antiepileptic monotherapy does not increase intrauterine death risk

Neither type nor dosage of antiepileptic drug affects the risk of intrauterine death among pregnant women with epilepsy when given as monotherapy, suggests research. [More]
Researchers uncover strong evidence for genetic causes of cerebral palsy

Researchers uncover strong evidence for genetic causes of cerebral palsy

Cerebral palsy (CP) is the most common cause of physical disability in children. It has historically been considered to be caused by factors such as birth asphyxia, stroke and infections in the developing brain of babies. [More]
Eisai, Halozyme partner to evaluate eribulin and PEGPH20 in HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer

Eisai, Halozyme partner to evaluate eribulin and PEGPH20 in HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer

Eisai Inc. announced today that its parent company Eisai Co., Ltd. (Headquarters: Tokyo, President and CEO: Haruo Naito) and Halozyme Therapeutics, Inc. (Headquarters: San Diego, California, President and CEO: Dr. Helen Torley) have signed a clinical collaboration agreement to evaluate Eisai's agent eribulin mesylate (brand name: Halaven, "eribulin") in combination with Halozyme's investigational drug PEGPH20 (PEGylated recombinant human hyaluronidase) in first line HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer. [More]
Female patients with depression have abnormally high expression levels of glutamate receptor genes

Female patients with depression have abnormally high expression levels of glutamate receptor genes

Numerous genes that regulate the activity of a neurotransmitter in the brain have been found to be abundant in brain tissue of depressed females. This could be an underlying cause of the higher incidence of suicide among women, according to research at the University of Illinois at Chicago. [More]
Advertisement