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Estrogens are a family of related molecules that stimulate the development and maintenance of female characteristics and sexual reproduction.

The natural estrogens produced by women are steroid molecules, which means that they are derived from a particular type of molecular skeleton containing four rings of carbon atoms, giving the shape shown here. The most prevalent forms of human estrogen are estradiol and estrone. Both are produced and secreted by the ovaries, although estrone is also made in the adrenal glands and other organs.
Researchers develop screening assay that quickly assesses nearly 1,500 compounds' effect on estrogen

Researchers develop screening assay that quickly assesses nearly 1,500 compounds' effect on estrogen

A team of researchers at City of Hope has developed a screening assay that can quickly assess up to 1,536 compounds' effect on estrogen activity in the body. The test can also evaluate whether chemicals act as inhibitors of aromatase, an enzyme linked to breast cancer that converts androgen to estrogen. [More]
New research points to potential target for treating triple negative breast cancer

New research points to potential target for treating triple negative breast cancer

New research from the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center and Georgia Regents University finds that a protein that fuels an inflammatory pathway does not turn off in breast cancer, resulting in an increase in cancer stem cells. This provides a potential target for treating triple negative breast cancer, the most aggressive form of the disease. [More]
Young women smokers may have increased risk of developing common type of breast cancer

Young women smokers may have increased risk of developing common type of breast cancer

Young women who smoke and have been smoking a pack a day for a decade or more have a significantly increased risk of developing the most common type of breast cancer. [More]

Findings expand treatment options for hormone-dependent breast cancer

According to the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, breast cancer is the most common cancer in women. For patients whose breast cancers are hormone-dependent, current treatment focuses on using drugs that block estrogen (a type of hormone) from attaching to estrogen receptors on tumor cells to prevent the cells from growing and spreading. [More]
Pfizer’s palbociclib Phase 2 trial achieves primary endpoint in patients with advanced breast cancer

Pfizer’s palbociclib Phase 2 trial achieves primary endpoint in patients with advanced breast cancer

Pfizer Inc. today announced that the randomized Phase 2 trial [PALOMA-1] of palbociclib achieved its primary endpoint by demonstrating a statistically significant and clinically meaningful improvement in progression-free survival (PFS) for the combination of palbociclib and letrozole compared with letrozole alone in post-menopausal women with estrogen receptor positive (ER+), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 negative (HER2-) locally advanced or newly diagnosed metastatic breast cancer. [More]

Biotheranostics launches complete genomic tests for metastatic cancer patients

bioTheranostics, Inc., today introduced the bioT3 Metastatic Cancer Solution, a suite of genomic-based tests that provide personalized diagnostic information and therapeutic guidance for metastatic cancer patients across the continuum of care. [More]

More than 1/3 of women experience hot flashes for 10 years after menopause

A team of researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania has found that moderate to severe hot flashes continue, on average, for nearly five years after menopause, and more than a third of women experience moderate/severe hot flashes for 10 years or more after menopause. [More]
Study points to gender-specific mechanisms of brain repair following oxygen deprivation

Study points to gender-specific mechanisms of brain repair following oxygen deprivation

Physicians have long known that oxygen deprivation to the brain around the time of birth causes worse damage in boys than girls. Now a study by researchers from the Johns Hopkins Children’s Center conducted in mice reveals one possible reason behind this gender disparity and points to gender-specific mechanisms of brain repair following such injury. [More]

Curie-Cancer, Servier renew partnership to identify new therapeutic targets for triple negative breast cancer

Curie-Cancer, the body which leads the Institut Curie's industry partner research activity, and Servier, today announce that they have renewed their partnership with the aim of identifying therapeutic targets for treating ‘triple negative’ breast cancers. The partnership will continue for a further three years. [More]

Environmental endocrine disrupters may endanger embryonic heart valves

Exposure to environmental endocrine disrupters, such as bisphenol A, which mimic estrogen, is associated with adverse health effects. Bisphenol A is commonly found in plastic bottles and plastic food containers. New research from a team including Carnegie's Daniel Gorelick and Marnie Halpern on the effects of these chemicals on zebrafish shows that embryonic heart valves could be particularly in danger. It is published by Environmental Health Perspectives. [More]
Moderate radiation doses can kill premalignant cells and prevent second breast cancers

Moderate radiation doses can kill premalignant cells and prevent second breast cancers

​Survivors of breast cancer have a one in six chance of developing breast cancer in the other breast. But a study conducted in mice suggests that survivors can dramatically reduce that risk through treatment with moderate doses of radiation to the unaffected breast at the same time that they receive radiation therapy to their affected breast. [More]
Function of stem cells in blood-forming system is regulated by estrogen, says study

Function of stem cells in blood-forming system is regulated by estrogen, says study

Scientists have known for years that stem cells in male and female sexual organs are regulated differently by their respective hormones. In a surprising discovery, researchers at the Children's Medical Center Research Institute at UT Southwestern (CRI) and Baylor College of Medicine have found that stem cells in the blood-forming system — which is similar in both sexes — also are regulated differently by hormones, with estrogen proving to be an especially prolific promoter of stem cell self-renewal. [More]
ASA's recommendations to help patients avoid unnecessary tests for chronic pain

ASA's recommendations to help patients avoid unnecessary tests for chronic pain

Not prescribing opioids first or as a long-term therapy for chronic, non-cancer pain and avoiding MRIs, CTs and X-rays for low-back pain are among the tests and treatments identified by ASA that are commonly ordered but not always necessary. [More]
Clues of "silent thief of sight”: Glaucoma

Clues of "silent thief of sight”: Glaucoma

Glaucoma is sometimes called the "silent thief of sight" because it slowly damages the eyes and can cause irreparable harm before there is any vision loss. But this disease is stealthy in more ways than one. [More]
Synta initiates three multicenter trials to evaluate ganetespib with chemotherapy for AML and MDS

Synta initiates three multicenter trials to evaluate ganetespib with chemotherapy for AML and MDS

Synta Pharmaceuticals Corp. today announced the initiation of three multicenter, randomized trials supported by the Leukemia & Lymphoma Research Fund and Cancer Research UK, evaluating ganetespib in combination with chemotherapy in first-line treatment of patients with AML and high risk MDS. [More]
Daily antibiotic use is effective for preventing recurrent urinary tract infections in women

Daily antibiotic use is effective for preventing recurrent urinary tract infections in women

While daily antibiotic use is the most effective method for preventing recurrent urinary tract infections in women, daily cranberry pills, daily estrogen therapy and monthly acupuncture treatments also have benefits that may be preferable for some patients, according to a new study by researchers at the Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute. [More]

Fetal exposure to Bisphenol A can increase risk for prostate cancer later in life

Fetal exposure to a commonly used plasticizer found in products such as water bottles, soup can liners and paper receipts can increase the risk for prostate cancer later in life, according to a study from the University of Illinois at Chicago published Jan. 7 online in the journal Endocrinology. [More]
Protein may be major culprit when breast cancer metastasizes to the brain

Protein may be major culprit when breast cancer metastasizes to the brain

A cancer-research team at the University of Wisconsin-Madison has identified a protein that may be a major culprit when breast cancer metastasizes to the brain. [More]

FNIH Biomarkers Consortium announces initial results of I-SPY 2 trial for breast cancer

The I-SPY 2 TRIAL, a randomized phase II clinical trial for breast cancer launched through a unique partnership with the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health (FNIH) Biomarkers Consortium and sponsored by QuantumLeap Healthcare Collaborative has graduated the first two drugs from its innovative, multidrug standing platform trial. [More]
Actavis' subsidiary files ANDA for generic version of NuvaRing

Actavis' subsidiary files ANDA for generic version of NuvaRing

Actavis plc today confirmed that its subsidiary, Warner Chilcott Company LLC, has filed an Abbreviated New Drug Application (ANDA) with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) seeking approval to market Ethinyl Estradiol and Etonogestrel Vaginal Ring, 0.015 mg/24 hour and 0.12 mg/24 hour. [More]