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Estrogens are a family of related molecules that stimulate the development and maintenance of female characteristics and sexual reproduction.

The natural estrogens produced by women are steroid molecules, which means that they are derived from a particular type of molecular skeleton containing four rings of carbon atoms, giving the shape shown here. The most prevalent forms of human estrogen are estradiol and estrone. Both are produced and secreted by the ovaries, although estrone is also made in the adrenal glands and other organs.
Researchers explore brain estrogens to mitigate learning and memory problems

Researchers explore brain estrogens to mitigate learning and memory problems

New studies being launched by neurobiologist Luke Remage-Healey at the University of Massachusetts Amherst will investigate how estrogens produced in the brains of young birds enhance their ability to learn songs during a critical window during development. [More]
Experts join MD Anderson to end cancer

Experts join MD Anderson to end cancer

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center is pleased to announce that one of the world's preeminent experts in breast cancer research and treatment, V. Craig Jordan, Ph.D., will join the institution's efforts to end cancer. Jordan is considered the "Father of Tamoxifen," the groundbreaking therapeutic drug that has saved countless lives. [More]
Scientist fights extremely aggressive and difficult-to-treat form of breast cancer

Scientist fights extremely aggressive and difficult-to-treat form of breast cancer

Biomedical scientist Kimberly L. Koss, PhD, is fighting an extremely aggressive and difficult-to-treat form of breast cancer. [More]
Chemoprevention and colon cancer: an interview with Dr. John Letterio, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine

Chemoprevention and colon cancer: an interview with Dr. John Letterio, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine

The basic idea of cancer chemopre­vention is to arrest or reverse the progression of pre­malignant cells towards full malignancy, using physiological mechanisms that do not kill healthy cells. [More]
Personalized medicine for breast cancer patients may be just around the corner

Personalized medicine for breast cancer patients may be just around the corner

For breast cancer patients, the era of personalized medicine may be just around the corner, thanks to recent advances by USC Stem Cell researcher Min Yu and scientists at Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School. [More]
Tamoxifen gel stops breast cancer growth without causing dangerous side effects

Tamoxifen gel stops breast cancer growth without causing dangerous side effects

A gel form of tamoxifen applied to the breasts of women with noninvasive breast cancer reduced the growth of cancer cells to the same degree as the drug taken in oral form but with fewer side effects that deter some women from taking it, according to new Northwestern Medicine- research. [More]
Acupuncture can affect severity of hot flashes for women in natural menopause

Acupuncture can affect severity of hot flashes for women in natural menopause

In the 2,500+ years that have passed since acupuncture was first used by the ancient Chinese, it has been used to treat a number of physical, mental and emotional conditions including nausea and vomiting, stroke rehabilitation, headaches, menstrual cramps, asthma, carpal tunnel, fibromyalgia and osteoarthritis, to name just a few. [More]
New findings paint optimistic picture of women's chances of surviving breast cancer

New findings paint optimistic picture of women's chances of surviving breast cancer

New findings from Fox Chase Cancer Center paint a relatively optimistic picture of women's chances of surviving a subset of breast cancers that have spread to the chest wall or skin, but not beyond. [More]
Letrozole drug results in higher birth rates in women with PCOS

Letrozole drug results in higher birth rates in women with PCOS

The drug letrozole results in higher birth rates in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) than the current preferred infertility treatment drug, according to a nationwide study led by Penn State College of Medicine researchers. [More]
Genentech agrees to acquire Seragon Pharmaceuticals

Genentech agrees to acquire Seragon Pharmaceuticals

Genentech, a member of the Roche Group, today announced it has entered into a definitive agreement to acquire Seragon Pharmaceuticals, Inc., a privately held biotechnology company based in San Diego, California. [More]
Conventional fertility hormones do not increase risk of breast, gynecological cancers

Conventional fertility hormones do not increase risk of breast, gynecological cancers

There is "little evidence" that the use of conventional fertility hormones used for ovarian stimulation in the treatment of infertility increases the long-term risk of breast and gynecological cancers, according to the results of a substantial 30-year follow-up study. [More]
Menopause-related changes in sex hormones linked to greater risk for heart disease

Menopause-related changes in sex hormones linked to greater risk for heart disease

As hormone levels change during the transition to menopause, the quality of a woman's cholesterol carriers degrades, leaving her at greater risk for heart disease, researchers at the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health discovered. [More]
Adeno-associated virus type 2 kills triple-negative breast cancer cells in mice

Adeno-associated virus type 2 kills triple-negative breast cancer cells in mice

A virus not known to cause disease kills triple-negative breast cancer cells and killed tumors grown from these cells in mice, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers. Understanding how the virus kills cancer may lead to new treatments for breast cancer. [More]
Animal study: Common BPA substitute alters brain development, causes hyperactive behavior

Animal study: Common BPA substitute alters brain development, causes hyperactive behavior

A chemical found in many "BPA free" consumer products, known as bisphenol S (BPS), is just as potent as bisphenol A (BPA) in altering brain development and causing hyperactive behavior, an animal study finds. [More]
Soy protein supplements do not reduce testosterone levels in men with Type 2 diabetes

Soy protein supplements do not reduce testosterone levels in men with Type 2 diabetes

Soy protein supplements, which contain natural estrogens, do not reduce testosterone levels in men with Type 2 diabetes who already have borderline-low testosterone, according to a new study. [More]
Low levels of testosterone decline physical function in elderly men

Low levels of testosterone decline physical function in elderly men

Elderly men with low levels of testosterone or other sex hormones have twice the likelihood of having declining physical function over two years' time compared with their peers who have the highest hormone levels, a new study from Australia finds. [More]

BPA appears to increase proliferation of breast cancer cells, diminish effectiveness of treatments

Bisphenol A (BPA), a chemical commonly used in plastics, appears to increase the proliferation of breast cancer cells, according to Duke Medicine researchers presenting at an annual meeting of endocrine scientists. [More]
Telephone-based weight loss intervention is effective in breast cancer treatments

Telephone-based weight loss intervention is effective in breast cancer treatments

A series of simple telephone calls can make a profound difference in helping women to meet their treatment goals for breast cancer, according to a randomized trial of women who are also obese, published online today in Journal of Clinical Oncology by Dr. Pamela Goodwin of Mount Sinai Hospital and the Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute. [More]
New driver of atherosclerosis may prove to be promising therapeutic target

New driver of atherosclerosis may prove to be promising therapeutic target

A new driver of atherosclerosis has been identified by researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center. This molecule, known as 27HC (27-hydroxycholesterol), has been found to exacerbate the development of the condition, and may prove to be a promising therapeutic target. [More]
New approach promises better drugs for diabetes and osteoporosis

New approach promises better drugs for diabetes and osteoporosis

By swapping replacement parts into the backbone of a synthetic hormone, UW-Madison graduate student Ross Cheloha and his mentor, Sam Gellman, along with collaborators at Harvard Medical School, have built a version of a parathyroid hormone that resists degradation in laboratory mice. [More]