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Honeybee study finds link between social behavior and circadian rhythms

Honeybee study finds link between social behavior and circadian rhythms

Circadian rhythms are internal clocks that determine many of an organism's daily rhythms, for example sleep-wake, feeding, urinary output and hormone production. [More]
Researchers identify set of genes that play vital role in early human development

Researchers identify set of genes that play vital role in early human development

Oxford University researchers are closer to solving a decade-old mystery after discovering that a set of genes they are studying play a key role in early human development. [More]
Virus-like elements within human genome linked to development of lupus and Sjogren's syndrome

Virus-like elements within human genome linked to development of lupus and Sjogren's syndrome

Researchers at Hospital for Special Surgery have uncovered a potential genetic trigger of systemic autoimmune disease. [More]
Anti-anxiety medication dampens helping behavior in rats

Anti-anxiety medication dampens helping behavior in rats

Rats given midazolam, an anti-anxiety medication, were less likely to free trapped companions because the drug lessened their empathy, according to a new study by University of Chicago neuroscientists. [More]

Electronic environment in health care can contribute to physician burnout

The growth and evolution of the electronic environment in health care is taking a toll on U.S. physicians. That's according to a national study of physicians led by Mayo Clinic which shows the use of electronic health records and computerized physician order entry leads to lower physician satisfaction and higher rates of professional burnout. The findings appear in Mayo Clinic Proceedings. [More]
Stent retriever devices revolutionize acute ischemic stroke care

Stent retriever devices revolutionize acute ischemic stroke care

New devices called stent retrievers, which effectively reverse strokes, have revolutionized the treatment of certain stroke patients, according to an article in the journal Expert Review of Neurotherapeutics. [More]
Scientists insert metabolic pathway for carbon fixation and sugar production into E. coli bacterium

Scientists insert metabolic pathway for carbon fixation and sugar production into E. coli bacterium

All life on the planet relies, in one way or another, on a process called carbon fixation: the ability of plants, algae and certain bacteria to "pump" carbon dioxide (CO2) from the environment, add solar or other energy and turn it into the sugars that are the required starting point needed for life processes. [More]
3D-printed model guides doctors to safely remove tumor from kidney

3D-printed model guides doctors to safely remove tumor from kidney

Doctors and scientists at Intermountain Medical Center in Salt Lake City printed and used a 3D kidney to help save a patient's organ during a complicated tumor-removal procedural. [More]
Researchers engineer revolutionary new approach to combat cancer treatment resistance

Researchers engineer revolutionary new approach to combat cancer treatment resistance

Math, biology and nanotechnology are becoming strange, yet effective bed-fellows in the fight against cancer treatment resistance. Researchers at the University of Waterloo and Harvard Medical School have engineered a revolutionary new approach to cancer treatment that pits a lethal combination of drugs together into a single nanoparticle. [More]
New light-based technology facilitates deeper look into human body

New light-based technology facilitates deeper look into human body

New light-based technologies that facilitate a look inside the human body using light -- and without cutting into the tissue -- promise to enable both compact, wearable devices for point-of-care diagnostics as well as powerful new systems that provide even more information and from even deeper under the skin. [More]
New study suggests how rod photoreceptors may have originated to give rise to nocturnal mammals

New study suggests how rod photoreceptors may have originated to give rise to nocturnal mammals

Retinas from our earliest vertebrate ancestors had cone-like photoreceptors, presumably allowing them to see in daylight, but little ability to see at night. Then, millions of years ago in the Mesozoic era, and in relatively short order, mammals emerged that had retinas with predominantly rod photoreceptors, allowing for them to see at night perhaps to hunt for food while their dinosaur predators were dozing. [More]
Switch to rituximab shows anti-inflammatory effect in relapsing-remitting MS

Switch to rituximab shows anti-inflammatory effect in relapsing-remitting MS

Rituximab may be an attractive treatment option for patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, suggest phase II study findings showing its efficacy in controlling inflammatory activity. [More]
Moffitt researchers develop mathematical model to show differences in subpopulations of tumors

Moffitt researchers develop mathematical model to show differences in subpopulations of tumors

Tumors are composed of many subpopulations of cells. A general consensus among scientists is that these subpopulations are due to random mutations. However, Moffitt Cancer Center researchers found that these assumptions may be incorrect. [More]
First CRISPR/Cas9 screen helps identify human proteins required for Zika virus replication

First CRISPR/Cas9 screen helps identify human proteins required for Zika virus replication

Scientists at the University of Massachusetts Medical School have performed the first CRISPR/Cas9 screen to discover human proteins that Zika virus needs for replication. [More]
Brain imaging finds link between blood-brain barrier disruption and severity of bleeding after stroke therapy

Brain imaging finds link between blood-brain barrier disruption and severity of bleeding after stroke therapy

In a study of stroke patients, investigators confirmed through MRI brain scans that there was an association between the extent of disruption to the brain's protective blood-brain barrier and the severity of bleeding following invasive stroke therapy. The results of the National Institutes of Health-funded study were published in Neurology. [More]
New research program seeks to elucidate traumatic memories of 2015 terrorist attacks in Paris

New research program seeks to elucidate traumatic memories of 2015 terrorist attacks in Paris

How will the traumatic events of the terrorist attacks of 13 November 2015 evolve in people's memories, whether collective or individual? How does individual memory feed on collective memory and vice versa? [More]
Researchers highlight gene loss as potential process of genetic change, evolutionary adaption

Researchers highlight gene loss as potential process of genetic change, evolutionary adaption

"Loss is nothing else but change and change is nature's delight" says the quote by the philosopher and emperor Marcus Aurelius, which opens the scientific article that analyses the gene loss phenomenon and its impact on the evolution of living beings. [More]
Research suggests gonad as vital player in evolutionary process

Research suggests gonad as vital player in evolutionary process

A pair of studies led by Indiana University researchers provide new evidence that when it comes to evolution, the testes may play a key role. [More]
Interdisciplinary approach to improve cancer treatments

Interdisciplinary approach to improve cancer treatments

Whether it focuses on determining why certain cancers develop drug resistance, finding a way to improve individual's immune systems or better understanding cancer cell evolution, fundamental scientific research will "stand up to cancer" with three new awards from the National Science Foundation. [More]
New model helps predict outbreaks of zoonotic diseases

New model helps predict outbreaks of zoonotic diseases

A model that predicts outbreaks of zoonotic diseases -- those originating in livestock or wildlife such as Ebola and Zika -- based on changes in climate, population growth and land use has been developed by a UCL-led team of researchers. [More]
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