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New tool interprets whole-exome tumor sequencing data for better cancer therapies

New tool interprets whole-exome tumor sequencing data for better cancer therapies

A University of Colorado Cancer study published today in the Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association describes a new tool that interprets the raw data of whole exome tumor sequencing and then matches the cancer's unique genetics to FDA-approved targeted treatments. [More]
Retina Implant receives CE approval for latest Alpha AMS device

Retina Implant receives CE approval for latest Alpha AMS device

Retina Implant AG, the leading developer of subretinal implants for patients blinded by retinitis pigmentosa (RP), today announced it received CE approval of its Alpha AMS device for marketing in the European economic area. [More]
Versatile automated microplate sample screening applications: an interview with Tobias Pusterla

Versatile automated microplate sample screening applications: an interview with Tobias Pusterla

Microplate readers are divided into single-mode and multi-mode readers. A single mode reader is mainly a reader dedicated to the detection of absorbance, luminescence or fluorescence. [More]
New TAU study shows how Neanderthals adapt to high-protein diet in Ice-Age Europe

New TAU study shows how Neanderthals adapt to high-protein diet in Ice-Age Europe

Homo sapiens, the ancestor of modern humans, shared the planet with Neanderthals, a close, heavy-set relative that dwelled almost exclusively in Ice-Age Europe, until some 40,000 years ago. [More]
Researchers use novel technology to sequence Y chromosome in malaria spreading mosquitoes

Researchers use novel technology to sequence Y chromosome in malaria spreading mosquitoes

A team of researchers with the Fralin Life Science Institute at Virginia Tech, working with a large international consortium, has sequenced the Y chromosome--the genetic driver of sex-determination and male fertility-- in a family of malaria spreading mosquitoes. [More]
Study traces ancient history of malaria evolution

Study traces ancient history of malaria evolution

A new analysis of the prehistoric origin of malaria suggests that it evolved in insects at least 100 million years ago, and the first vertebrate hosts of this disease were probably reptiles, which at that time would have included the dinosaurs. [More]
Fertility goes down when cost of achieving social status goes up

Fertility goes down when cost of achieving social status goes up

Competition for social status may be an important driver of lower fertility in the modern world, suggests a new study published in Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B. [More]
Scientists identify two enzymes that appear to play role in metabolism, inflammation

Scientists identify two enzymes that appear to play role in metabolism, inflammation

A team led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute and the Salk Institute for Biological Studies has discovered two enzymes that appear to play a role in metabolism and inflammation—and might someday be targeted with drugs to treat type 2 diabetes and inflammatory disorders. [More]
Study reveals new hypothesis on evolution of hundreds of malaria species

Study reveals new hypothesis on evolution of hundreds of malaria species

A study published this week in the journal Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution reveals a new hypothesis on the evolution of hundreds of species of malaria - including the form that is deadly to humans. [More]
Study reveals malaria has its roots in bird hosts

Study reveals malaria has its roots in bird hosts

Malaria affects close to 500 million people every year, but we're not the only ones--different species of malaria parasite can infect birds, bats, and other mammals too. A Field Museum study published in Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution reveals a new take on the evolution of different malaria species and contributes to the ongoing search for the origins of malaria in humans. [More]
Research: X and Y DNA swapping may occur more often than previously thought

Research: X and Y DNA swapping may occur more often than previously thought

It turns out that the rigid "line in the sand" over which the human sex chromosomes---the Y and X--- go to avoid crossing over is a bit blurrier than previously thought. Contrary to the current scientific consensus, Arizona State University assistant professor Melissa Wilson Sayres has led a research team that has shown that X and Y DNA swapping may occur much more often. [More]
Competition between mixed malaria parasite strains could influence drug resistance

Competition between mixed malaria parasite strains could influence drug resistance

Scientists have documented for the first time how competition among different malaria parasite strains in human hosts could influence the spread of drug resistance. [More]
Whole genome sequencing of chimpanzee parasite reveals clues about human malaria

Whole genome sequencing of chimpanzee parasite reveals clues about human malaria

Understanding the origins of emerging diseases - as well as more established disease agents -- is critical to gauge future human infection risks and find new treatment and prevention approaches. This holds true for malaria, which kills more than 500,000 people a year. Symptoms, including severe anemia, pregnancy-associated malaria, and cerebral malaria, have been linked to the parasite's ability to cause infected red blood cells to bind to the inner lining of blood vessels. [More]
Shigella dysenteriae pathogen probably originated in Europe, genetic study reveals

Shigella dysenteriae pathogen probably originated in Europe, genetic study reveals

The largest genetic study on the bacterium responsible for epidemic dysentery has revealed that the Shigella dysenteriae pathogen, which remains a real scourge in Africa and Asia, probably originated in Europe. [More]
Real-world studies support switching IBD patients from reference infliximab to biosimilar infliximab

Real-world studies support switching IBD patients from reference infliximab to biosimilar infliximab

Data presented today at the 11th Congress of European Crohn’s and Colitis Organisation adds to the growing body of real-world evidence that supports switching patients from reference infliximab to biosimilar infliximab. [More]
Mothers give offspring a head start in life

Mothers give offspring a head start in life

Thank your mothers: A research collaboration between UC Santa Barbara and L'École Normale Supérieure in Paris has proven that deterministic maternal effects can give offspring a better start on life. [More]
Homeostasis may have allowed first living cells to maintain internal environment

Homeostasis may have allowed first living cells to maintain internal environment

A Massachusetts General Hospital research team investigating how the earliest stages of life might have developed has discovered a way the first living cells could have met a key challenge -- maintaining a constant internal environment, a process called homeostasis, even when external conditions change. [More]

Scientists discover variation in organ growth when body size changes

Scientists at the University of Sussex have discovered how parts of organs grow differently when body size changes. [More]
Diet-induced obesity, diabetes can be epigenetically inherited by offspring, say scientists

Diet-induced obesity, diabetes can be epigenetically inherited by offspring, say scientists

Scientists at Helmholtz Zentrum München, in collaboration with researchers from Technical University of Munich and the German Center for Diabetes Research, have shown that diet-induced obesity and diabetes can be epigenetically inherited by the offspring via both the oocytes and the sperm. [More]
Postnatal depression dissuades women from having a third child

Postnatal depression dissuades women from having a third child

Mothers who have postnatal depression are unlikely to have more than two children according to research carried out by evolutionary anthropologists the University of Kent and published by Evolution, Medicine and Public Health. [More]
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