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Righttime Medical Care CEO presents lecture on MTBI at Maryland’s annual conference

Robert G. Graw, Jr., M.D., Chief Executive Officer of Maryland-based Righttime Medical Care, presented his lecture, An Integrated Community Model for the Education, Evaluation and Treatment: An Update, on mild traumatic brain injuries (MTBI) at the Brain Injury Association of Maryland's annual conference on March 20. [More]

Panasonic and KKR complete share purchase agreement

Panasonic Corporation ("Panasonic") and KKR, a leading global investment firm, today announced the completion of a share purchase agreement and a shareholders' agreement under which Panasonic and KKR have become joint partners of Panasonic Healthcare Co., Ltd. ("Panasonic Healthcare"). [More]
Baxter plans to create two independent global healthcare companies

Baxter plans to create two independent global healthcare companies

Baxter International Inc. today announced plans to create two separate, independent global healthcare companies -- one focused on developing and marketing innovative biopharmaceuticals and the other on life-saving medical products. Both will be global leaders in their respective markets. [More]
New urinary catheter design can eliminate nearly all hard-to-kill biofilm

New urinary catheter design can eliminate nearly all hard-to-kill biofilm

For the millions of people forced to rely on a plastic tube to eliminate their urine, developing an infection is nearly a 100 percent guarantee after just four weeks. But with the help of a little bubble-blowing, biomedical engineers hope to bring relief to urethras everywhere. [More]
Researchers develop mathematical model that provides insights about molecular mechanisms behind virus assembly

Researchers develop mathematical model that provides insights about molecular mechanisms behind virus assembly

Mathematicians at the University of York have joined forces with experimentalists at the University of Leeds to take an important step in discovering how viruses make new copies of themselves during an infection. [More]
Researchers use retro approach to produce new drugs

Researchers use retro approach to produce new drugs

This alternative approach to creating artificial organic molecules, called bioretrosynthesis, was first proposed four years ago by Brian Bachmann, associate professor of chemistry at Vanderbilt University. Now Bachmann and a team of collaborators report that they have succeeded in using the method to produce the HIV drug didanosine. [More]
Misplaced protein provides promising drug target for kidney cancer

Misplaced protein provides promising drug target for kidney cancer

The shortage of oxygen, or hypoxia, created when rapidly multiplying kidney cancer cells outgrow their local blood supply can accelerate tumor growth by causing a nuclear protein called SPOP-which normally suppresses tumor growth-to move out of the nucleus to the cytoplasm, where it has the opposite effect, promoting rapid proliferation. [More]

Viewpoints: Supreme Court on religion and health; a GOP Senate's effect on health law; where are the young adults?

Should corporations have the right to get out of obeying federal law and refuse services and deny health care coverage to some people because of the corporate owners' religious beliefs? That's the question the U.S. Supreme Court is weighing this month – and the answer could affect millions of Americans' everyday lives (Cecile Richards and Chad Griffin, 3/18). [More]

Inner-ear membrane uses tiny pores to mechanically separate sounds

Even in a crowded room full of background noise, the human ear is remarkably adept at tuning in to a single voice - a feat that has proved remarkably difficult for computers to match. [More]
Archaeologists find oldest complete example of metastatic cancer in 3,000 year-old skeleton

Archaeologists find oldest complete example of metastatic cancer in 3,000 year-old skeleton

Archaeologists have found the oldest complete example in the world of a human with metastatic cancer in a 3,000 year-old skeleton. [More]

Scientists build tiny "molecular drill bits" that kill bacteria by bursting through their protective cell walls

In response to drug-resistant "superbugs" that send millions of people to hospitals around the world, scientists are building tiny, "molecular drill bits" that kill bacteria by bursting through their protective cell walls. [More]

Sequencing reveals genetic diversity in hospital-acquired bacterium

Using genome sequencing, National Institutes of Health scientists and their colleagues have tracked the evolution of the antibiotic-resistant bacterium Klebsiella pneumoniae sequence type 258 (ST258), an important agent of hospital-acquired infections. [More]
Scientists discover key mechanism that guides balance and limb movements

Scientists discover key mechanism that guides balance and limb movements

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have discovered an important mechanism underlying sensory feedback that guides balance and limb movements. [More]

Personality predicts social learning in wild monkeys

Baboons learn from other baboons about new food sources - but only if they are bold or anxious - according to a new study published in the journal PeerJ). The results suggest that personality plays a key role in social learning in animals, something previously ignored in animal cognition studies. [More]
Scientist receives AGA-GCF Research Scholar Award for research in gastric, esophageal cancer

Scientist receives AGA-GCF Research Scholar Award for research in gastric, esophageal cancer

The American Gastroenterological Association (AGA) Research Foundation and the Gastric Cancer Foundation (GCF) are pleased to announce that the first AGA-Gastric Cancer Foundation Research Scholar Award in Gastric and Esophageal Cancer will support Mohamed El-Zaatari, PhD, from University of Michigan, as he conducts research into the role of myeloid cells in the transition from chronic inflammation to gastric pre-neoplasia. [More]
Parkinson's patients under risk of developing dementia can be identified quickly, say researchers

Parkinson's patients under risk of developing dementia can be identified quickly, say researchers

It may now be possible to identify the first-stage Parkinson's patients who will go on to develop dementia, according to a study conducted at the Institut universitaire de gériatrie de Montréal by Dr. Oury Monchi, PhD, and his postdoctoral student, Dr. Alexandru Hanganu, MD, PhD, both of whom are affiliated with Université de Montréal. [More]

New theory regarding cause and development of endometriosis

Changes to two previously unstudied genes are the centerpiece of a new theory regarding the cause and development of endometriosis, a chronic and painful disease affecting 1 in 10 women. [More]

MD² commemorates 18 years of practicing highly personalized care

Widely credited with originating the concept of concierge medicine, MD² celebrates 18 years of practicing highly personalized care. [More]

New report explains how pathogens exploit immune systems to evade bodies' defenses

A new report appearing in the March 2014 issue of The FASEB Journal helps shed light on what drives the evolution of pathogens, as well as how our bodies adapt to ward them off. [More]

Scientists develop novel system to produce smoke solutions and stimulate seed germination

​Although seemingly destructive, wildfires help to maintain biodiversity and are an important element of many ecosystems throughout the world. Not only do fires discourage non-native and invasive species from becoming established, but the quick release of nutrients, heat, and compounds found in ash and smoke play an important role in the life cycle of the native flora. [More]