Evolution News and Research RSS Feed - Evolution News and Research

Key lessons from Middle East Respiratory Syndrome outbreak in South Korea

Key lessons from Middle East Respiratory Syndrome outbreak in South Korea

The outbreak of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) in South Korea is the subject of a fast-tracked editorial in the International Journal of Infectious Diseases, written by Dr. Eskild Petersen and colleagues. [More]
New study launched in Liberia to better understand health consequences of Ebola virus disease

New study launched in Liberia to better understand health consequences of Ebola virus disease

The Liberia-U.S. clinical research partnership known as PREVAIL has launched a study of people in Liberia who have survived Ebola virus disease (EVD) within the past two years. The study investigators hope to better understand the long-term health consequences of EVD, determine if survivors develop immunity that will protect them from future Ebola infection, and assess whether previously EVD-infected individuals can transmit infection to close contacts and sexual partners. [More]
Future Cardiology’s special issue focuses on recent advances, challenges in cardiology

Future Cardiology’s special issue focuses on recent advances, challenges in cardiology

In recognition of 10 years of publication Future Cardiology has launched a special issue focused on recent advances and emerging challenges in specific areas of cardiology. [More]
Phase I study: Idarucizumab reverses anticoagulant effect of dabigatran in healthy volunteers

Phase I study: Idarucizumab reverses anticoagulant effect of dabigatran in healthy volunteers

Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today announced that The Lancet published results from a phase I study investigating the effects of idarucizumab, an investigational agent, in reversing the anticoagulant effect of dabigatran in healthy volunteers. The data demonstrate that complete reversal was achieved following administration of idarucizumab. [More]
Researchers uncover new mechanism that innate immune system uses to curb viral infections

Researchers uncover new mechanism that innate immune system uses to curb viral infections

An innovative mechanism that the innate immune system uses to control viral infections has been uncovered by researchers at the University Medical Centers in Mainz and Freiburg. Central to this is the discovery that two different but related elements of the immune system can act together in concert to fight, for example, rotavirus infections. [More]
Researchers discover new aspect of gene regulation

Researchers discover new aspect of gene regulation

Researchers at the Max F. Perutz Laboratories of the University of Vienna and the Medical University of Vienna as well as at the University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences in Vienna have discovered an entirely new aspect of gene regulation they call exitron splicing. [More]
New insights on crop-rotation resistant rootworms may help develop sustainable agricultural practices

New insights on crop-rotation resistant rootworms may help develop sustainable agricultural practices

After decades of effort, scientists are finally figuring out how insects develop resistance to environmentally friendly farming practices - such as crop rotation - that are designed to kill them. The researchers say their insights will help develop more sustainable agricultural practices. [More]
Percentage of female authorship in gastroenterology journals remains lower than expected

Percentage of female authorship in gastroenterology journals remains lower than expected

The percentage of U.S. female physician authors of original research in major gastroenterology journals has grown over time, yet the percentage of women in the senior author position remains lower than expected based on the proportion of female gastroenterologists in academia. [More]
Children undergoing deep brain stimulation for generalized dystonia experience better outcomes

Children undergoing deep brain stimulation for generalized dystonia experience better outcomes

Children and adolescents who received deep brain stimulation for generalized dystonia maintained significant symptom relief for up to eight years, according to a study presented today at the 12th World Congress of the International Neuromodulation Society. [More]

RFID smart cabinet systems make headway into healthcare

Radio frequency identification (RFID) is rapidly making headway into the healthcare and pharmaceutical industries, especially in assets tracking, supply chain management, and inventory management. In particular, the need for inventory management to reduce instances of loss or misplacement of medical equipment, supplies or drugs, along with efforts to minimise errors and improve patient safety, drives the market for RFID smart cabinet systems. [More]
Massey researchers aim to develop models that can predict complications from stem cell transplantation

Massey researchers aim to develop models that can predict complications from stem cell transplantation

Researchers at VCU Massey Cancer Center's Bone Marrow Transplant Program have recently published findings from a phase 2 clinical trial that demonstrate lymphocyte recovery in related and unrelated stem cell transplant recipients generally falls into three patterns that are significantly associated with survival. [More]
Cell fusion triggers multiple genetic changes that convert normal cells to cancer cells

Cell fusion triggers multiple genetic changes that convert normal cells to cancer cells

Although there is no one established universal cause of cancer, genetic changes are central to its development. The accumulation of spontaneous genetic changes, or mutations, that occur when cells divide can be hastened by exposure to carcinogens such as cigarette smoke (lung cancer) and infectious agents such as the papillomavirus (cervical cancer). [More]
Oxygen regulatory pathway can act to trigger tissue regeneration in mice

Oxygen regulatory pathway can act to trigger tissue regeneration in mice

A study led by Ellen Heber-Katz, PhD, of the Lankenau Institute for Medical Research, part of Main Line Health, shows that a primordial form of energy production that still exists in mammals can be harnessed to achieve spontaneous tissue regeneration in mice, without the need for added stem cells. [More]
Ultrasound becoming the most widely used imaging tool in medicine today

Ultrasound becoming the most widely used imaging tool in medicine today

Mention "ultrasound" and most people likely will think of an image of a fetus in a mother's womb. But while providing peeks at the not-yet-born is one of ultrasound's most common applications, that's only a small part of the picture. [More]
New study suggests that humans and chimpanzees share basic brain skills needed for cooking

New study suggests that humans and chimpanzees share basic brain skills needed for cooking

A new study, co-authored by Felix Warneken, the John L. Loeb Associate Professor of the Social Sciences, and Alexandra Rosati '05, currently a post-doctoral fellow in the Psychology Department at Yale University who will join the Department of Human Evolutionary Biology as an assistant professor at Harvard this summer, suggests that humans' cognitive capacity for cooking are also share by chimpanzees. [More]
Ariana Pharma joins the GastricGlycoExplorer consortium

Ariana Pharma joins the GastricGlycoExplorer consortium

This collaboration is carried out within the GastricGlycoExplorer consortium, a European Commission funded project. The consortium aims at discovering and developing new diagnostic signatures by characterizing the sugars that are attached to the surface of gastric tissue. "Glycomics" provides a systematic approach for studying sugars that are naturally present on cell surfaces and its application may lead to determine early markers of gastric cancer. [More]
Researchers identify key driver mutations in glioma samples that confirm tumor heterogeneity

Researchers identify key driver mutations in glioma samples that confirm tumor heterogeneity

Caris Life Sciences today announced the presentation of data from a study in which researchers identified biomarker changes, including key driver mutations, in 89% of metachronous paired glioma tumors, indicating changes in response to therapy as the disease progresses. [More]
DNA analysis reveals how ovarian cancer takes genetic twists and turns to outsmart chemotherapy

DNA analysis reveals how ovarian cancer takes genetic twists and turns to outsmart chemotherapy

The largest complete DNA analysis of ovarian cancer in the world, published overnight in Nature, has revealed unprecedented new insight into the genetic twists and turns a deadly form of the disease takes to outsmart chemotherapy, potentially changing treatment approaches for women around the world. [More]
Researchers find weak spot in some antibiotic-resistant bacteria

Researchers find weak spot in some antibiotic-resistant bacteria

Using a complex modeling program that helps analyze the physical dynamics of large, structurally complex protein molecules, a research team has made progress towards finding a weak spot in the architecture of a group of enzymes that are essential to antibiotic resistance in a number of bacteria. [More]
Research findings could help guide development of potential treatments for HCV

Research findings could help guide development of potential treatments for HCV

Warring armies use a variety of tactics as they struggle to gain the upper hand. Among their tricks is to attack with a decoy force that occupies the defenders while an unseen force launches a separate attack that the defenders fail to notice. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement