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Novel material can provide protection against brain injuries

Novel material can provide protection against brain injuries

Funding has been awarded to world-leading, US-based helmet designer and manufacturer, Roy Burek of Charles Owen Inc., to develop a novel material created by researchers from Cardiff University's School of Engineering that can improve the safety of athletes, members of the military and others from brain injuries by better absorbing and dissipating impact. [More]
TSRI scientists track how HIV-fighting antibodies develop over time

TSRI scientists track how HIV-fighting antibodies develop over time

In a new study, a team led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute tracked how a family of these HIV-fighting antibodies develops over time. The research shows how a future vaccine might trigger the immune system to produce these antibodies more effectively. [More]
Our senses far from flawless, UCLA study reveals

Our senses far from flawless, UCLA study reveals

Our vision and hearing aren't as reliable as we might think, according to a study by life scientists at UCLA. [More]
Four journalists from China and India win 2016 EurekAlert! Fellowships for International Science Reporters

Four journalists from China and India win 2016 EurekAlert! Fellowships for International Science Reporters

Four early-career journalists from China and India have emerged from the fiercest competition to date to win the 2016 EurekAlert! Fellowships for International Science Reporters. [More]
CRISPR-Cas9 can help knock out genes in exotic animals

CRISPR-Cas9 can help knock out genes in exotic animals

The simplicity of CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing will soon make studying the genes of any organism, from the simplest slime mold to the octopus, as easy as it now is to study the genes controlling development in standard lab animals such as nematodes, fruit flies, frogs and mice. [More]
Abbott, UCSF identify human pegivirus 2 among some patients with hepatitis C

Abbott, UCSF identify human pegivirus 2 among some patients with hepatitis C

Abbott and University of California San Francisco published research identifying a newly discovered human virus, known as human pegivirus 2 (HPgV-2), and proving it is found among some patients with hepatitis C (HCV). [More]
Benefits of early dementia diagnosis may lead to challenging issues, new study shows

Benefits of early dementia diagnosis may lead to challenging issues, new study shows

A new epidemiologic study showed that patients with early stage dementia, who had been referred to a specialist, have twice the risk of institutionalization compared to those who are not, according to a research study published in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease this month. [More]
Lilly, Merck announce another immuno-oncology collaboration

Lilly, Merck announce another immuno-oncology collaboration

Eli Lilly and Company and Merck, known as MSD outside the United States and Canada, today announced another immuno-oncology collaboration that will evaluate abemaciclib (LY2835219), Lilly's cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 4 and 6 inhibitor, and Merck's KEYTRUDA (pembrolizumab) in a Phase I study across multiple tumor types. [More]
Researchers use mathematical models to study brain cells essential for correct functioning of neurons

Researchers use mathematical models to study brain cells essential for correct functioning of neurons

Applying mathematical models used for studying the galaxies or interactions between elementary particles, researchers at the Institute of Neuroscience of the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, in collaboration with Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, have analysed the spatial distribution of astrocytes: brain cells that are essential for the correct functioning of neurons. [More]
Roche announces regulatory clearance to finalize acquisition of Kapa Biosystems

Roche announces regulatory clearance to finalize acquisition of Kapa Biosystems

Roche today announced regulatory clearance to finalize acquisition of Kapa Biosystems, Inc., a privately-held company headquartered in Wilmington, Massachusetts, US. [More]
Simple approach to predict viral evolution may improve vaccine efficacy

Simple approach to predict viral evolution may improve vaccine efficacy

New results from a study performed at the University of Helsinki suggest that genomic information from circulating influenza viruses can help in producing more efficient seasonal vaccines. The researchers were able to develop a simple approach for reliable real-time tracking and prediction of viral evolution based on whole-genome sequences of influenza viruses. [More]
Coordinated health care not helping people with mental health conditions

Coordinated health care not helping people with mental health conditions

People who are diagnosed with mental health conditions did not see improvements in coordination and quality of care as hoped but did not experience large cuts in access as some had feared under an early alternative payment model designed to encourage coordinated health care, according to a team led by researchers from Harvard Medical School and Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. [More]
Stanford researchers invent new technique to dramatically accelerate protein evolution

Stanford researchers invent new technique to dramatically accelerate protein evolution

All living things require proteins, members of a vast family of molecules that nature "makes to order" according to the blueprints in DNA. [More]
BioAtla, Pfizer sign license and option agreement for new class of antibody therapeutics

BioAtla, Pfizer sign license and option agreement for new class of antibody therapeutics

BioAtla LLC, a biotechnology company focused on the development of Conditionally Active Biologic (CAB) antibody therapeutics, today announced that it has entered into a license and option agreement with Pfizer Inc. to advance the development and commercialization of a new class of antibody therapeutics based on BioAtla's CAB platform and utilizing Pfizer's proprietary antibody drug conjugate (ADC) payloads. [More]
Bacteriophage therapy: an alternative to antibiotics? An interview Professor Clokie

Bacteriophage therapy: an alternative to antibiotics? An interview Professor Clokie

A phage is a virus that infects a bacterium. People often get very confused about what the difference is between a virus and a bacterium. A virus, like a bacterium, is also a microorganism, but unlike bacteria, it needs to have a host to be able to replicate and propagate. [More]
Neoadjuvant chemotherapy can stimulate evolution of breast cancer tumor

Neoadjuvant chemotherapy can stimulate evolution of breast cancer tumor

Russian scientists have found that neoadjuvant chemotherapy in patients with breast cancer can stimulate evolution of the tumor. The results of the research conducted by Nicholay Litvyakov, D.Sc. at Cancer Research Institute, Head of the Tumor Virology Laboratory, and TSU researcher Marina Ibragimova, were published in "Siberian Journal of Oncology." [More]
Oxford University researchers unlock the secret behind bacterial sex

Oxford University researchers unlock the secret behind bacterial sex

Migration between different communities of bacteria is the key to the type of gene transfer that can lead to the spread of traits such as antibiotic resistance, according to researchers at Oxford University. [More]
ICGC announces availability of more genomic data on Amazon Web Services Cloud for cancer researchers

ICGC announces availability of more genomic data on Amazon Web Services Cloud for cancer researchers

The International Cancer Genome Consortium announced today that 1,200 encrypted cancer whole genome sequences are now securely available on the Amazon Web Services (AWS) Cloud for access by cancer researchers worldwide. [More]
Scientists succeed in promoting regeneration of injured neurons in zebrafish by the use of light

Scientists succeed in promoting regeneration of injured neurons in zebrafish by the use of light

The nervous system is built to last a lifetime, but diverse diseases or environmental insults can overpower the capacity of neurons to maintain function or to repair after trauma. A team led by Dr. Hernán López-Schier, head of the Research Unit Sensory Biology and Organogenesis at Helmholtz Zentrum München, now succeeded in promoting the repair of an injured neural circuit in zebrafish. [More]
Some gut microbes may hold the key to regulating good health, say Oregon scientists

Some gut microbes may hold the key to regulating good health, say Oregon scientists

University of Oregon scientists have found that strength in numbers doesn't hold true for microbes in the intestines. A minority population of the right type might hold the key to regulating good health. [More]
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