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IBI scientists make progress in identifying new biomarkers for preventing colorectal cancer

IBI scientists make progress in identifying new biomarkers for preventing colorectal cancer

Scientists from the Instituto de Investigación Biomédica [Institute of Biomedical Research], in Galicia (Spain), have made progress in the identification of new biomarkers for improving prevention of colorectal cancer. [More]
Nuclea and Aelan partner to develop, commercialize novel biomarker tests using STEM cells as models

Nuclea and Aelan partner to develop, commercialize novel biomarker tests using STEM cells as models

Nuclea Biotechnologies Inc. announced today that it is partnering with Aelan Cell Technologies Inc. (San Francisco, California) for the development, validation and commercialization of novel biomarker tests and companion diagnostics using human STEM cells as models. [More]
Researchers explore why some mutations can cause severe disease in humans, but benign in animals

Researchers explore why some mutations can cause severe disease in humans, but benign in animals

Researchers at Duke University School of Medicine and Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School have identified a mechanism that explains why some mutations can be disease-causing in one genome but benign in another. [More]

High-value CI function helps companies make better business decisions

The Competitive Intelligence (CI) function helps companies to make better decisions, anticipate threats, plan effectively in a rapidly-changing marketplace, and avoid corporate risk. [More]
Penn Medicine scientists identify stem-like 'progenitor' cell that produces heart muscle cells

Penn Medicine scientists identify stem-like 'progenitor' cell that produces heart muscle cells

Future therapies for failing hearts are likely to include stem-like cells and associated growth factors that regenerate heart muscle. Scientists from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania have just taken an important step towards that future by identifying a stem-like "progenitor" cell that produces only heart muscle cells. [More]
Study may help find strategies to control mosquito populations

Study may help find strategies to control mosquito populations

Every time you put on bug spray this summer, you're launching a strike in the ongoing war between humans and mosquitoes -- one that is rapidly driving the evolution of the pests. Scientists studying mosquitoes in various types of environments in the United States and in Russia found that between 5 and 20 percent of a mosquito population's genome is subject to evolutionary pressures at any given time -- creating a strong signature of local adaptation to environment and humans. [More]
First ESC recommendations for patients with cardiac arrhythmias, CKD published in EP Europace

First ESC recommendations for patients with cardiac arrhythmias, CKD published in EP Europace

The first ESC recommendations for patients with cardiac arrhythmias and chronic kidney disease (CKD) are presented today at EHRA EUROPACE - CARDIOSTIM 2015 and published in EP Europace. [More]
Statins benefit patients undergoing major lung resection, lower major complications

Statins benefit patients undergoing major lung resection, lower major complications

Statins have been shown to reduce complications from cardiovascular surgery. To determine whether statins might also help those undergoing major lung surgeries, a team at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center conducted a well-designed study that randomized patients to receive either a statin or placebo before and after surgery. [More]

Methods used to compare brain size across species not appropriate, finds UC Santa Barbara researcher

In research, sometimes setting out to demonstrate one concept actually results in proving something entirely different. It's important to be flexible. [More]
Nonmotor features may predict PD progression

Nonmotor features may predict PD progression

The presence of mild cognitive impairment, orthostatic hypotension, and rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder may identify a subset of Parkinson’s disease patients with a poor prognosis, research suggests. [More]

UC Berkeley study shows humans can navigate through their sense of smell

Like homing pigeons, humans have a nose for navigation because our brains are wired to convert smells into spatial information, new research from the University of California, Berkeley, shows. [More]
New book examines all aspects of HBV and HDV infections

New book examines all aspects of HBV and HDV infections

Despite the availability of an effective vaccine for hepatitis B, hundreds of millions of people worldwide are infected with the hepatitis B virus (HBV). This virus can cause serious liver damage and cancer in chronically infected patients. Hepatitis delta virus (HDV), a satellite of HBV, can exacerbate the disease. [More]
Analysis of transportation data could help predict spread of flu epidemic across the U.S.

Analysis of transportation data could help predict spread of flu epidemic across the U.S.

To predict how a seasonal influenza epidemic will spread across the United States, one should focus more on the mobility of people than on their geographic proximity, a new study suggests. [More]
Survey finds first evidence of MRSA in sausages, minced pork from supermarkets in the UK

Survey finds first evidence of MRSA in sausages, minced pork from supermarkets in the UK

A survey carried out earlier this year has found the first evidence of the 'superbug' bacteria Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in sausages and minced pork obtained from supermarkets in the UK. However, researchers stress that this does not pose a significant immediate risk to the public. [More]
Key lessons from Middle East Respiratory Syndrome outbreak in South Korea

Key lessons from Middle East Respiratory Syndrome outbreak in South Korea

The outbreak of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) in South Korea is the subject of a fast-tracked editorial in the International Journal of Infectious Diseases, written by Dr. Eskild Petersen and colleagues. [More]
New study launched in Liberia to better understand health consequences of Ebola virus disease

New study launched in Liberia to better understand health consequences of Ebola virus disease

The Liberia-U.S. clinical research partnership known as PREVAIL has launched a study of people in Liberia who have survived Ebola virus disease (EVD) within the past two years. The study investigators hope to better understand the long-term health consequences of EVD, determine if survivors develop immunity that will protect them from future Ebola infection, and assess whether previously EVD-infected individuals can transmit infection to close contacts and sexual partners. [More]
Future Cardiology’s special issue focuses on recent advances, challenges in cardiology

Future Cardiology’s special issue focuses on recent advances, challenges in cardiology

In recognition of 10 years of publication Future Cardiology has launched a special issue focused on recent advances and emerging challenges in specific areas of cardiology. [More]
Phase I study: Idarucizumab reverses anticoagulant effect of dabigatran in healthy volunteers

Phase I study: Idarucizumab reverses anticoagulant effect of dabigatran in healthy volunteers

Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today announced that The Lancet published results from a phase I study investigating the effects of idarucizumab, an investigational agent, in reversing the anticoagulant effect of dabigatran in healthy volunteers. The data demonstrate that complete reversal was achieved following administration of idarucizumab. [More]
Researchers uncover new mechanism that innate immune system uses to curb viral infections

Researchers uncover new mechanism that innate immune system uses to curb viral infections

An innovative mechanism that the innate immune system uses to control viral infections has been uncovered by researchers at the University Medical Centers in Mainz and Freiburg. Central to this is the discovery that two different but related elements of the immune system can act together in concert to fight, for example, rotavirus infections. [More]
Researchers discover new aspect of gene regulation

Researchers discover new aspect of gene regulation

Researchers at the Max F. Perutz Laboratories of the University of Vienna and the Medical University of Vienna as well as at the University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences in Vienna have discovered an entirely new aspect of gene regulation they call exitron splicing. [More]
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