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The rise of disease ecology and its implications for parasitology

The rise of disease ecology and its implications for parasitology

The Journal of Parasitology – With a shared focus on host–pathogen relationships, parasitology and disease ecology seem to have a lot in common. But parasitology lacks the eye-catching—and wallet-opening—emphasis on known diseases. By working more closely with disease ecologists, could parasitologists gain more support for work crucial to predicting and controlling infectious diseases? [More]
iPad use before surgery requiring anaesthesia effective in reducing child anxiety

iPad use before surgery requiring anaesthesia effective in reducing child anxiety

New research presented at this year's World Congress of Anaesthesiologists in Hong Kong (Aug. 28 - Sept. 2) shows that allowing children to use iPads to distract them before surgery requiring general anaesthesia is as effective at lowering their anxiety as conventional sedatives. [More]
The evolution of medical imaging – where will innovation take us next?

The evolution of medical imaging – where will innovation take us next?

The influence of medical imaging is constantly growing, diseases are detected earlier and treatments are becoming more effective. Within the last 25 years, cancer mortality rates have decreased by an impressive 25%. Advances in medical imaging have a big part to play in this achievement and we can expect that as technology continues to develop, mortality rates will drop even further. [More]
New study uses evolutionary theory to predict cancer risk in patients with Barrett's esophagus

New study uses evolutionary theory to predict cancer risk in patients with Barrett's esophagus

A disorder known as Barrett's esophagus (BE) affects some 200,000 Americans each year. The condition, which is caused by stomach acid damaging the lining of the esophagus, can lead to the development of a serious, potentially fatal cancer of epithelial tissue, known as esophageal adenocarcinoma. [More]
New study looks to saliva of humans and primates to gain insights into evolution

New study looks to saliva of humans and primates to gain insights into evolution

There's no need to reinvent the genetic wheel. That's one lesson of a new study that looks to the saliva of humans, gorillas, orangutans, macaques and African green monkeys for insights into evolution. [More]
Large infant faeces study investigates how bacterial community changes in baby's gut

Large infant faeces study investigates how bacterial community changes in baby's gut

Daily samples of baby poo taken throughout a full year will reveal how the bacterial community changes in the gut of infants. [More]
UNC cardiologist examines challenges facing cardiac intensive care units and clinicians

UNC cardiologist examines challenges facing cardiac intensive care units and clinicians

Jason Katz, MD, MHS, associate professor of medicine at UNC School of Medicine and medical director of the cardiac intensive care unit, was the lead author of a recently published manuscript in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology that examined the early growth and maturation of critical care cardiology, and the challenges and uncertainties that threaten to stymie the growth of this fledgling discipline. [More]

Large-scale groundwater pumping increases arsenic risk in Southeast Asia

Large-scale groundwater pumping is opening doors for dangerously high levels of arsenic to enter some of Southeast Asia's aquifers, with water now seeping in through riverbeds with arsenic concentrations more than 100 times the limits of safety, according to a new study from scientists at Columbia University's Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, MIT, and Hanoi University of Science. [More]
Archaeologists shed more light on purpose of ancient stone artifacts

Archaeologists shed more light on purpose of ancient stone artifacts

A team of psychologists, kinesiologists and archaeologists at Indiana University and elsewhere are throwing new light on a longstanding archaeological mystery: the purpose of a large number of spherical stone artifacts found at a major archaeological site in South Africa. [More]
Common cold virus actually transmitted from camels to humans

Common cold virus actually transmitted from camels to humans

There are four globally endemic human coronaviruses which, together with the better known rhinoviruses, are responsible for causing common colds. Usually, infections with these viruses are harmless to humans. [More]
Schizophrenia vulnerability emerged after divergence of modern humans from Neanderthals

Schizophrenia vulnerability emerged after divergence of modern humans from Neanderthals

Schizophrenia poses an evolutionary enigma. The disorder has existed throughout recorded human history and persists despite its severe effects on thought and behavior, and its reduced rates of producing offspring. [More]
TSRI scientists tackle decades-old challenge by re-creating primordial RNA world

TSRI scientists tackle decades-old challenge by re-creating primordial RNA world

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have taken a big step toward the laboratory re-creation of the “RNA world,” which is generally believed to have preceded modern life forms based on DNA and proteins. [More]
Mathematicians developing new statistical methods to predict bacterial epidemics

Mathematicians developing new statistical methods to predict bacterial epidemics

Mathematicians are now developing completely new statistical calculations on the world's fastest computers in order to be able to predict how epidemics of dangerous hospital bacteria spread. [More]
New study uncovers how chromosomal changes impact tumor formation and growth

New study uncovers how chromosomal changes impact tumor formation and growth

As with most cancers, triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) cells have abnormal amounts of chromosomes or DNA copy number aberrations (CNAs) in their genomes. [More]
Scientists identify potential mechanism that paves way for improved treatment of fungal infections

Scientists identify potential mechanism that paves way for improved treatment of fungal infections

By identifying new compounds that selectively block mitochondrial respiration in pathogenic fungi, Whitehead Institute scientists have identified a potential antifungal mechanism that could enable combination therapy with fluconazole, one of today's most commonly prescribed fungal infection treatments. [More]
New model of Williams syndrome may shed light on neurobiology of the human social brain

New model of Williams syndrome may shed light on neurobiology of the human social brain

In a study spanning molecular genetics, stem cells and the sciences of both brain and behavior, researchers at University of California San Diego, with colleagues at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies and elsewhere, have created a neurodevelopmental model of a rare genetic disorder that may provide new insights into the underlying neurobiology of the human social brain. [More]
Gene mutation linked to impulsive drunken behaviour shields bearers from obesity, insulin resistance

Gene mutation linked to impulsive drunken behaviour shields bearers from obesity, insulin resistance

University of Helsinki researchers have previously demonstrated that a point mutation in a gene of serotonin 2B receptor can render the carrier prone to impulsive behaviour, particularly when drunk. [More]
Immunotherapy innovations in oncology: an interview with Robert LaCaze

Immunotherapy innovations in oncology: an interview with Robert LaCaze

The body’s immune system is an excellent weapon against many diseases. For more than 100 years, immunology and immunotherapy have played an ever-increasing role in the understanding and treatment of cancer. [More]
Scientists unlock genetic code controlling limb regeneration

Scientists unlock genetic code controlling limb regeneration

Many lower organisms retain the miraculous ability to regenerate form and function of almost any tissue after injury. Humans share many of our genes with these organisms, but our capacity for regeneration is limited. [More]
UCLA researchers develop noninvasive technique to treat breathing problems in premature babies

UCLA researchers develop noninvasive technique to treat breathing problems in premature babies

As humans evolved over many thousands of years, our bodies developed a system to help us when we start running and suddenly need more oxygen. Now, using that innate reflex as inspiration, UCLA researchers have developed a noninvasive way to treat potentially harmful breathing problems in babies who were born prematurely. [More]
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