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Neurocrine completes enrollment in Phase III clinical trial of NBI-98854 in tardive dyskinesia patients

Neurocrine completes enrollment in Phase III clinical trial of NBI-98854 in tardive dyskinesia patients

Neurocrine Biosciences, Inc. announced today that it has recently completed subject randomization of the Phase III clinical trial (Kinect 3 Study) of its proprietary Vesicular Mono-Amine Transporter 2 (VMAT2) compound NBI-98854 in tardive dyskinesia patients. [More]

CPhI reports positive outlook on the Chinese pharmaceutical market

CPhI – a division of UBM EMEA – alongside UBM Sinexpo, announces the findings of the Pharma Insights China 2015 report. [More]
Tumor cells associated with pancreatic cancer work with each other to increase tumor spread

Tumor cells associated with pancreatic cancer work with each other to increase tumor spread

Tumor cells associated with pancreatic cancer often behave like communities by working with each other to increase tumor spread and growth to different organs. Groups of these cancer cells are better than single cancer cells in driving tumor spread, according to new research from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania published in Cancer Discovery online in advance of the print issue. [More]
Ceres receives U.S. patent for iCODE multi-gene trait development system

Ceres receives U.S. patent for iCODE multi-gene trait development system

Ceres, Inc., an agricultural biotechnology company, has been awarded a U.S. patent for its iCODE multi-gene trait development system. The company indicated that the patent award is a key milestone in its plan to further develop and license this technology to other crop companies and organizations. [More]
Researchers report role of two gene-regulating molecules in Parkinson's disease

Researchers report role of two gene-regulating molecules in Parkinson's disease

As Parkinson's disease progresses in patients, a puzzling dichotomy plays out in their brains. One set of neurons degenerates, while a similar population nearby is spared the same degree of damage. Why the difference? An answer to this question could clear the way for preventions and treatments for this disease, which impairs movement. [More]
Study: Dietary carbohydrate essential for evolution of modern big-brained humans

Study: Dietary carbohydrate essential for evolution of modern big-brained humans

Understanding how and why we evolved such large brains is one of the most puzzling issues in the study of human evolution. It is widely accepted that brain size increase is partly linked to changes in diet over the last 3 million years, and increases in meat consumption and the development of cooking have received particular attention from the scientific community. [More]
Study: Men's and women's ideas of perfect mate differ due to evolutionary pressures

Study: Men's and women's ideas of perfect mate differ due to evolutionary pressures

Men's and women's ideas of the perfect mate differ significantly due to evolutionary pressures, according to a cross-cultural study on multiple mate preferences by psychologists at The University of Texas at Austin. [More]
University of Exeter researchers develop new camera technology that reveals the world through animal's eyes

University of Exeter researchers develop new camera technology that reveals the world through animal's eyes

New camera technology that reveals the world through the eyes of animals has been developed by University of Exeter researchers. The details are published today in the journal Methods in Ecology and Evolution. [More]
New biosensors detect efficient microbial workers that produce chemical, pharmaceutical commodities

New biosensors detect efficient microbial workers that produce chemical, pharmaceutical commodities

Super productive factories of the future could employ fleets of genetically engineered bacterial cells, such as common E. coli, to produce valuable chemical commodities in an environmentally friendly way. [More]

LifeBond announces closure of $27M Series D preferred equity investment

LifeBond, a leader in the development of bio-surgical medical devices for tissue repair, announced today it has closed a $27M Series D preferred equity investment. Participants in the round include Pitango Venture Capital, Adams Street Partners, Sino Biopharmaceutical Ltd., and all existing investors. [More]
Rice University scientists identify genetic mechanism that allows bacteria to resist antibiotics

Rice University scientists identify genetic mechanism that allows bacteria to resist antibiotics

Rice University scientists are developing strategies to keep germs from evolving resistance to antibiotics by heading them off at the pass. [More]
G7 Therapeutics, MorphoSys collaborate on novel antibody therapeutics targeting GPCRs and ion channels

G7 Therapeutics, MorphoSys collaborate on novel antibody therapeutics targeting GPCRs and ion channels

MorphoSys AG and G7 Therapeutics AG announced today that they have signed an agreement to collaborate on novel antibody therapeutics targeting G protein-coupled receptors and potentially other disease-related transmembrane proteins such as ion channels. [More]
Environmental factors promote genetic mutations, have underappreciated effect on disease, evolution

Environmental factors promote genetic mutations, have underappreciated effect on disease, evolution

Washington State University researchers say environmental factors are having an underappreciated effect on the course of disease and evolution by prompting genetic mutations through epigenetics, a process by which genes are turned on and off independent of an organism's DNA sequence. [More]
Researchers reconstruct ancient virus to improve gene therapy

Researchers reconstruct ancient virus to improve gene therapy

Researchers at Massachusetts Eye and Ear/Schepens Eye Research Institute have reconstructed an ancient virus that is highly effective at delivering gene therapies to the liver, muscle, and retina. This discovery, published July 30 in Cell Reports, could potentially be used to design gene therapies that are not only safer and more potent than therapies currently available, but may also help a greater number of patients. [More]
IU scientists find evidence that invisible war between microorganisms may affect human health

IU scientists find evidence that invisible war between microorganisms may affect human health

Health experts have warned for years that the overuse of antibiotics is creating "superbugs" able to resist drugs treating infection. [More]
Study shows how genetic changes lead to differences in form and function of species

Study shows how genetic changes lead to differences in form and function of species

Ten thousand years ago, a golden grain got naked, brought people together and grew to become one of the top agricultural commodities on the planet. [More]
Innovative course helps make medical students more confident about dealing with health disparities

Innovative course helps make medical students more confident about dealing with health disparities

An innovative three-month elective course has helped make some first-year medical students at Albert Einstein College of Medicine more confident about dealing with health disparities they'll likely encounter as physicians, according to a follow-up study published online today in the journal Academic Medicine. [More]
Understanding the workings of error correction mechanism in cell division

Understanding the workings of error correction mechanism in cell division

Cell biologists led by Thomas Maresca at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, with collaborators elsewhere, report an advance in understanding the workings of an error correction mechanism that helps cells detect and correct mistakes in cell division early enough to prevent chromosome mis-segregation and aneuploidy, that is, having too many or too few chromosomes. [More]

New finding could help change pharmaceutical treatment of neurodegenerative diseases

Diseases like Alzheimer's are caused when proteins aggregate and clump together. In a world first, EPFL scientists have successfully distinguished between the disease-causing aggregation forms of proteins. [More]
Study findings could lead to new ways to tailor therapies for cancer

Study findings could lead to new ways to tailor therapies for cancer

By studying the yeast used in beer- and bread-making, researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine have uncovered the mechanism by which ancient proteins repair DNA damage and how their dysfunction could lead to the development of tumors. [More]
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