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Study shows link between upright locomotion and spinal health

Study shows link between upright locomotion and spinal health

A Simon Fraser University researcher has uncovered what may be the first quantified evidence demonstrating a relationship between upright locomotion and spinal health. [More]
Researchers explore evolution of eardrums

Researchers explore evolution of eardrums

Researchers at the RIKEN Evolutionary Morphology Laboratory and the University of Tokyo in Japan have determined that the eardrum evolved independently in mammals and diapsids--the taxonomic group that includes reptiles and birds. Published in Nature Communications, the work shows that the mammalian eardrum depends on lower jaw formation, while that of diapsids develops from the upper jaw. [More]

Scientists use computer simulations to study how evolution makes invaders spread even faster

Today, invasive animals and plants spread all around the globe. Predicting the dynamics of these invasions is of great ecological and socioeconomical interest. Yet studying them is fundamentally challenging because of the large spatial and temporal scales involved. Scientists at Eawag and University of Zurich are now using computer simulations and small artificial laboratory worlds, to study how rapid evolution makes invaders spread even faster. [More]
Winners of GSA poster awards announced at Fungal Genetics Conference

Winners of GSA poster awards announced at Fungal Genetics Conference

The Genetics Society of America and the community of fungal geneticists are pleased to announce the winners of the GSA poster awards at the 28th Fungal Genetics Conference, which took place in Pacific Grove, CA, March 17-22, 2015. [More]
James Shapiro's latest research could soon mark new standard for diabetes treatment

James Shapiro's latest research could soon mark new standard for diabetes treatment

James Shapiro, one of the world's leading experts in emerging treatments of diabetes, can't help but be excited about his latest research. The results he says, could soon mark a new standard for treatment--not only in diabetes, but in several other diseases as well. [More]
Experts to make roadmap for future research, clinical trials for SCLC patients at IASLC workshop

Experts to make roadmap for future research, clinical trials for SCLC patients at IASLC workshop

Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) will be the concentrated focus when 100 global experts in the field meet for a workshop hosted by the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer on April 22-24, 2015 at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York City. [More]
Stem cell disease model reveals how tumor suppressor may drive bone cancer

Stem cell disease model reveals how tumor suppressor may drive bone cancer

Using induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), a team led by Mount Sinai researchers has gained new insight into genetic changes that may turn a well known anti-cancer signaling gene into a driver of risk for bone cancers, where the survival rate has not improved in 40 years despite treatment advances. [More]
Winners of GSA poster awards announced at 56th Annual Drosophila Research Conference

Winners of GSA poster awards announced at 56th Annual Drosophila Research Conference

The Genetics Society of America (GSA) and the Drosophila research community are pleased to announce the winners of the GSA poster awards at the 56th Annual Drosophila Research Conference, which took place in Chicago, IL, March 4-8, 2015. [More]
Challenges involved in tracing the source of Legionnaires’ disease outbreak

Challenges involved in tracing the source of Legionnaires’ disease outbreak

Genetic research helps to explain why tracing the source of an outbreak of Legionnaires' disease that claimed four lives has proven to be more complicated than scientists hoped. [More]
Qualcomm Life launches HealthyCircles Mobile app

Qualcomm Life launches HealthyCircles Mobile app

Qualcomm Incorporated today announced that its subsidiary, Qualcomm Life, Inc., launched the HealthyCircles Mobile application, a secure, medical-grade mobile care solution that provides a frictionless on-the-go care experience for consumers via their mobile device. [More]
New model can help predict how humans adapt to high- and low-altitude hypoxia

New model can help predict how humans adapt to high- and low-altitude hypoxia

There are few times in life when one should aim for suboptimal performance, but new research at Rice University suggests scientists who study metabolism and its role in evolution should look for signs of just that. [More]
Dartmouth researchers use new strategies to target drug-resistant pathogens

Dartmouth researchers use new strategies to target drug-resistant pathogens

By engineering antibacterial enzymes, Dartmouth investigators led by Karl Griswold, PhD are using novel strategies to target the prevalent drug-resistant bacterium Staphylococcus aureus. [More]
Research may point to new paradigms in diagnosis, treatment of aggressive cancers

Research may point to new paradigms in diagnosis, treatment of aggressive cancers

All living things--from dandelions to reindeer--evolve over time. Cancer cells are no exception, and are subject to the two overarching mechanisms described by Charles Darwin: chance mutation and natural selection. [More]
Pseudogenes may play role in cancer development, shows study

Pseudogenes may play role in cancer development, shows study

Pseudogenes, a sub-class of long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) that developed from the genome's 20,000 protein-coding genes but lost the ability to produce proteins, have long been considered nothing more than genomic "junk." Yet the retention of these 20,000 mysterious remnants during evolution has suggested that they may in fact possess biological functions and contribute to the development of disease. [More]
Humans can get better 'gas mileage' using unpowered exoskelton

Humans can get better 'gas mileage' using unpowered exoskelton

It's taken millions of years for humans to perfect the art of walking. But research results published today in the journal Nature show that humans can get better 'gas mileage' using an unpowered exoskeleton to modify the structure of their ankles. The device puts an extra spring in each human step, reducing metabolic energy consumption by 7 percent below walking in normal athletic shoes. [More]
Scientists uncover the genetic root of prostate cancer

Scientists uncover the genetic root of prostate cancer

Scientists have revealed the root of prostate cancers in individual men, discovering that despite huge genetic variety between tumours they also share common gene faults - insight that could offer new treatment hopes, according to research published in Nature today (Wednesday). [More]
MHIF investigator performs first atrial fibrillation ablation in U.S. using SMARTTOUCH SF catheter

MHIF investigator performs first atrial fibrillation ablation in U.S. using SMARTTOUCH SF catheter

Dr. Daniel Melby, an investigator at the Minneapolis Heart Institute Foundation, performed the first atrial fibrillation ablation in the U.S. using Biosense Webster's new THERMOCOOL SMARTTOUCH SF contact force sensing catheter as part of an FDA regulated safety trial (SMART-SF). [More]
Neurocrine Biosciences, Mitsubishi Tanabe to develop and commercialize NBI-98854 in select Asian markets

Neurocrine Biosciences, Mitsubishi Tanabe to develop and commercialize NBI-98854 in select Asian markets

Neurocrine Biosciences, Inc. today announced that it has entered into an exclusive collaboration and licensing agreement for the development and commercialization of its VMAT2 inhibitor, NBI-98854, in Japan and other select Asian markets with Mitsubishi Tanabe Pharma Corporation. [More]
Big data helps discover gephyrin protein's connection in human history

Big data helps discover gephyrin protein's connection in human history

Big data: It's a term we read and hear about often, but is hard to grasp. Computer scientists at Washington University in St. Louis' School of Engineering & Applied Science tackled some big data about an important protein and discovered its connection in human history as well as clues about its role in complex neurological diseases. [More]
Genes crucial for vision multiplied in early stages of vertebrate evolution

Genes crucial for vision multiplied in early stages of vertebrate evolution

A new study from SciLifeLab at Uppsala University published in PLOS ONE shows that genes crucial for vision were multiplied in the early stages of vertebrate evolution and acquired distinct functions leading to the sophisticated mechanisms of vertebrate eyes. [More]
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