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Study shows potential of treating recurrent CDI with frozen fecal matter

Study shows potential of treating recurrent CDI with frozen fecal matter

A preliminary study has shown the potential of treating recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (a bacterium that is one of the most common causes of infection of the colon) with oral administration of frozen encapsulated fecal material from unrelated donors, which resulted in an overall rate of resolution of diarrhea of 90 percent, according to a study published in JAMA. [More]
Fecal microbiota transplantation officially recommended for effective treatment of C. difficile infection

Fecal microbiota transplantation officially recommended for effective treatment of C. difficile infection

The transplantation of faecal microbiota from a healthy donor has been shown in recent clinical studies to be a safe and highly effective treatment for recurrent Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) infection and is now recommended in European treatment guidelines. [More]
Fecal microbiota transplantation works by restoring healthy bacteria and functioning to recipient's gut

Fecal microbiota transplantation works by restoring healthy bacteria and functioning to recipient's gut

Fecal microbiota transplantation --- the process of delivering stool bacteria from a healthy donor to a patient suffering from intestinal infection with the bacterium Clostridium difficile --- works by restoring healthy bacteria and functioning to the recipient's gut, according to a study published this week in mBio-, the online open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology. [More]
Specific enzyme helps protect good commensal bacteria from harmful effects of antibiotics

Specific enzyme helps protect good commensal bacteria from harmful effects of antibiotics

Researchers from Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland have discovered that populating the gastrointestinal (GI) tracts of mice with Bacteroides species producing a specific enzyme helps protect the good commensal bacteria from the harmful effects of antibiotics. [More]
Use of frozen stool for fecal transplant successfully treats C. difficile infection

Use of frozen stool for fecal transplant successfully treats C. difficile infection

Using frozen stool from healthy, unrelated donors was safe and effective in treating patients with serious, relapsing diarrhea caused by Clostridium difficile, according to a new pilot study published in Clinical Infectious Diseases and available online. [More]
Nearly 179 million cases of acute diarrhea occur each year in the U.S.

Nearly 179 million cases of acute diarrhea occur each year in the U.S.

In the United States, approximately 179 million cases of acute diarrhea occur each year, and most of those cases are entirely preventable, a researcher from The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston concluded in a New England Journal of Medicine review article. [More]
Restoring helpful bacteria of the gut and intestines may treat patients with RCDI, find scientists

Restoring helpful bacteria of the gut and intestines may treat patients with RCDI, find scientists

Scientists at the Institute for Genome Sciences at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and physicians at Sinai Hospital, Baltimore, MD, have found that restoring the normal, helpful bacteria of the gut and intestines may treat patients suffering from recurrent Clostridium difficile infections. Transplanting fecal matter of healthy donors into patients with recurrent C. difficile infection appears to restore normal bacterial composition and resolve infection. [More]

Review Article examines FMT methodology as effective treatment for C. difficile infection

Fecal microbiota transplantation has emerged as a highly effective treatment for recurrent Clostridium difficile infection, with very early experience suggesting that it may also play a role in treating other gastrointestinal and non-GI diseases. [More]
Three winners announced for biomedical engineering design competition in DEBUT challenge

Three winners announced for biomedical engineering design competition in DEBUT challenge

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Mayo Clinic opens new C. difficile Clinic at Rochester campus

Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) has reached an epidemic state and is the most common infectious cause of diarrhea in hospitals. Health care providers are seeing increased severity and recurrence rates of the infection. In response, Mayo Clinic has opened a C. difficile Clinic at the Rochester campus. [More]

Scientists work together to optimize the quality, availability of fecal microbiota transplants

Monarch Labs and the BioTherapeutics, Education & Research Foundation announced today their collaboration to develop two fecal microbiota transplantation products. [More]
Colonoscopic FMT effective in treating IBD, C.difficile-associated diarrhea

Colonoscopic FMT effective in treating IBD, C.difficile-associated diarrhea

Growing evidence for the effectiveness of fecal microbiota transplants as a treatment for patients with recurrent bouts of Clostridium difficile (C.difficile) associated diarrhea is presented in three studies -- including a long-term follow-up of colonoscopic fecal microbiota transplant (FMT) for recurrent C. difficile Infection that included 77 patients from five different states-- unveiled today at the American College of Gastroenterology's (ACG) 76th Annual Scientific meeting in Washington, DC. [More]
'Good bugs' promising against ulcerative colitis, psoriasis, chronic fatigue syndrome

'Good bugs' promising against ulcerative colitis, psoriasis, chronic fatigue syndrome

In four different studies presented at the American College of Gastroenterology's (ACG) 76th Annual Scientific meeting in Washington, DC, researchers explored the effectiveness of probiotics for antibiotic-associated diarrhea; as an anti-inflammatory agent for patients with ulcerative colitis, psoriasis and chronic fatigue syndrome; and for people with abdominal discomfort and bloating who have not been diagnosed with a functional bowel disorder, such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). [More]
Majority of patients with ulcerative colitis eager to undergo fecal microbiota transplantation

Majority of patients with ulcerative colitis eager to undergo fecal microbiota transplantation

The first study of the social and ethical issues associated with a provocative approach to treatment for ulcerative colitis has found that the majority of potential patients are eager for what is now called "fecal microbiota transplantation" to become available, although many have concerns about donor selection, screening, and methods of delivery. [More]