Fibroblast News and Research RSS Feed - Fibroblast News and Research

Fibroblasts are connective tissue cells which secrete an extracellular matrix rich in collagen and other macromolecules.
Length of telomere may help determine prostate cancer patient's prognosis

Length of telomere may help determine prostate cancer patient's prognosis

Like the plastic caps at the end of shoelaces, telomeres protect — in their case — the interior-gene containing parts of chromosomes that carry a cell's instructional material. Cancer cells are known to have short telomeres, but just how short they are from cancer cell to cancer cell may be a determining factor in a prostate cancer patient's prognosis, according to a study led by Johns Hopkins scientists. [More]
New computational model to improve treatment of dangerous reactions to medical implants

New computational model to improve treatment of dangerous reactions to medical implants

A team from The University of Texas at Arlington has used mathematical modeling to develop a computer simulation they hope will one day improve the treatment of dangerous reactions to medical implants such as stents, catheters and artificial joints. [More]
Nanodiamonds could be used to promote bone growth and durability of dental implants

Nanodiamonds could be used to promote bone growth and durability of dental implants

UCLA researchers have discovered that diamonds on a much, much smaller scale than those used in jewelry could be used to promote bone growth and the durability of dental implants. [More]
Basic fibroblast growth factor can protect endplate in motor neurons of injured spinal cord

Basic fibroblast growth factor can protect endplate in motor neurons of injured spinal cord

In current studies, the degeneration and protection measures in the distal end of the injured spinal cord and target organ muscle effector have scarcely been investigated. The distal end of the spinal cord and neuromuscular junction may develop secondary degenera-tion and damage following spinal cord injury because of the loss of neural connections. [More]
Non-adherent bone marrow cell-derived mesenchymal stem cells could differentiate into neuronal-like cells

Non-adherent bone marrow cell-derived mesenchymal stem cells could differentiate into neuronal-like cells

It is widely believed that bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells are highly adherent fibroblastic cells, defined as colony-forming unit-fibroblasts. Nevertheless, a few reports have shown that the non-adherent bone marrow cells can give rise to colony-forming unit-fibroblasts in vitro, and possess a certain differentiation potential. [More]
FIBRO-TARGETS project aims to identify mechanisms involved in MIF, define therapeutic approaches

FIBRO-TARGETS project aims to identify mechanisms involved in MIF, define therapeutic approaches

Unravelling the mechanisms of cardiac fibrosis will lead to the discovery of therapeutic target candidates for various cardiac diseases. FIBRO-TARGETS brings together eleven European expert teams from six different countries both from public research institutes and European biotechs. [More]
Blind mole-rats live underground in low-oxygen environments, are long-lived and resistant to cancer

Blind mole-rats live underground in low-oxygen environments, are long-lived and resistant to cancer

Like naked mole-rats (Heterocephalus gaber), blind mole-rats (of the genus Spalax) live underground in low-oxygen environments, are long-lived and resistant to cancer. A new study demonstrates just how cancer-resistant Spalax are, and suggests that the adaptations that help these rodents survive in low-oxygen environments also play a role in their longevity and cancer resistance. [More]

Debiopharm starts Debio 1347 phase I study in patients with advanced solid tumors

Debiopharm Group, the Swiss-based global biopharmaceutical company that focuses on the development of prescription drugs that target unmet medical needs including oncology, today announced the start of a phase I, open label multicenter study of a selective FGFR 1, 2, 3 inhibitor, Debio 1347 (CH5183284) in patients with advanced solid tumors. [More]
Researchers discover role played by epigenetic factors in senescence and age-related diseases

Researchers discover role played by epigenetic factors in senescence and age-related diseases

One way cells promote tumor suppression is through a process called senescence, an irreversible arrest of proliferation. Senescence is thought to be associated with normal aging, but is also a protective measure by the body against run-away cell replication. [More]
'Helper cells' improve survival rate of transplanted stem cells, finds study

'Helper cells' improve survival rate of transplanted stem cells, finds study

Like volunteers handing out cups of energy drinks to marathon runners, specially engineered "helper cells" transplanted along with stem cells can dole out growth factors to increase the stem cells' endurance, at least briefly, Johns Hopkins researchers report. [More]

New technique may convert cells from heart disease patients into heart muscle cells

Researchers have developed a new technique that might one day be used to convert cells from heart disease patients into heart muscle cells that could act as a personalized treatment for their condition. [More]
AMSBIO sponsor poster prize at Beatson International Cancer Conference

AMSBIO sponsor poster prize at Beatson International Cancer Conference

AMSBIO, a provider of cutting-edge life science technologies and services for accelerating discovery in cancer research, has continued its sponsorship of the annual poster prize at the Beatson International Cancer Conference (7th -10th July 2013). [More]
Osteoarthritis research: an interview with Dr Deborah Mason, Cardiff University

Osteoarthritis research: an interview with Dr Deborah Mason, Cardiff University

Osteoarthritis is an extremely common condition affecting about 8 million people in the UK. The elderly are particularly susceptible, with up to 45% of people over 65 years, having the disease. [More]
Brain tumor cells in arrested development contribute to cell variety that protects cancer

Brain tumor cells in arrested development contribute to cell variety that protects cancer

A program that pushes immature cells to grow up and fulfill their destiny as useful, dedicated cells is short-circuited in the most common and deadly form of brain tumor, scientists at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center report this week in the Early Edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. [More]
Columbia researchers identify 18 new genes that drive glioblastoma multiforme

Columbia researchers identify 18 new genes that drive glioblastoma multiforme

A team of researchers at the Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center at Columbia University Medical Center has identified 18 new genes responsible for driving glioblastoma multiforme, the most common-and most aggressive-form of brain cancer in adults. The study was published August 5, 2013, in Nature Genetics. [More]
New finding suggests potential to improve safety, performance of reprogrammed cells

New finding suggests potential to improve safety, performance of reprogrammed cells

The enormous promise of regenerative medicine is matched by equally enormous challenges. But a new finding by a team of researchers led by Weill Cornell Medical College has the potential to improve both the safety and performance of reprogrammed cells. [More]
Study shows potential to improve both safety and performance of reprogrammed cells

Study shows potential to improve both safety and performance of reprogrammed cells

The enormous promise of regenerative medicine is matched by equally enormous challenges. But a new finding by a team of researchers led by Weill Cornell Medical College has the potential to improve both the safety and performance of reprogrammed cells. [More]
NIH expands CRIC study to identify risk factors for progression of early stage CKD

NIH expands CRIC study to identify risk factors for progression of early stage CKD

Researchers from the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort study are embarking on another five years of work to identify risk factors for progression of early stage chronic kidney disease, better understand the importance of reduced kidney function in older persons, and learn what role CKD may play in other illnesses that require hospitalization. CRIC is supported by the National Institutes of Health. [More]

Study may lead to personalized treatments for mitochondrial energy disorders

Researchers have identified a master network of signaling molecules that acts like a "fuse box" to regulate the cellular effects of defective energy flow in mitochondrial respiratory chain diseases—a diverse set of difficult-to-treat genetic-based energy disorders. [More]
Discovery provides evidence that genetic defect responsible for Down syndrome can be suppressed

Discovery provides evidence that genetic defect responsible for Down syndrome can be suppressed

Scientists at the University of Massachusetts Medical School are the first to establish that a naturally occurring X chromosome "off switch" can be rerouted to neutralize the extra chromosome responsible for trisomy 21, also known as Down syndrome, a genetic disorder characterized by cognitive impairment. [More]