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Reducing cocaine use can potentially reverse coronary atherosclerosis

Reducing cocaine use can potentially reverse coronary atherosclerosis

People who use cocaine regularly are at high risk of coronary artery disease. A study in the Journal of Addiction Medicine, the official journal of the American Society of Addiction Medicine, reports that stopping or reducing cocaine use can potentially reverse the process of coronary atherosclerosis. The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer. [More]
Forensic experts need statistical models to give weight to DNA-evidence

Forensic experts need statistical models to give weight to DNA-evidence

How do forensic scientists deal with complex DNA-evidence found at crime scenes? Giulia Cereda developed new statistical models to analyse them. [More]
200th live donor kidney transplant offers promise of new life for the New Year

200th live donor kidney transplant offers promise of new life for the New Year

In late December in San Antonio, Texas, a 36-year-old mother of three from Jefferson City, Missouri, gave her best friend the most precious gift of all: a healthy kidney and the promise of a new life for the New Year. [More]
Pediatric dentist performs laser lip- and tongue-tie releases for infants

Pediatric dentist performs laser lip- and tongue-tie releases for infants

Dr. Martin Kaplan, DMD, DABLS, a Stoughton, MA based pediatric dentist performs 21st century laser lip- and tongue-tie releases for infants. [More]
American Journal of Nursing declares 2016 winners of its annual Book of the Year Awards

American Journal of Nursing declares 2016 winners of its annual Book of the Year Awards

The American Journal of Nursing (AJN) is pleased to announce the 2016 winners of its annual Book of the Year Awards. Winners in 19 categories appear in the journal's January issue. AJN, the "leading voice of nursing since 1900," is published by Wolters Kluwer. [More]
MedUni Vienna scientists show that addictive cravings can be detected after death

MedUni Vienna scientists show that addictive cravings can be detected after death

A protein known as FosB in the reward centre of the brain alters in chronically ill people suffering from an addictive disorder (e.g. heroin addiction): it is genetically modified, split off and shortened. [More]

Many people prone to remembering false events, research reveals

Many people are prone to 'remembering' events that never happened, according to new research by the University of Warwick. [More]
World traveler resumes active lifestyle after partial knee replacement surgery

World traveler resumes active lifestyle after partial knee replacement surgery

David Morris of Alexandria, Virginia has a fascinating job that takes him all over the world. So when arthritis and unrelenting knee pain put a crimp in his active lifestyle, he thought it was time to consider knee replacement. [More]
Study reveals new insights into drug-caused deaths among health care professionals

Study reveals new insights into drug-caused deaths among health care professionals

An Australian-first study conducted by Monash University has found that from 2003-2013 nearly five deaths per 1000 employed Australian health care professionals were caused by drugs, with a significant association between specific professions and drug type. [More]
New technique for identifying illicit drugs can provide high sensitivity and rapid results

New technique for identifying illicit drugs can provide high sensitivity and rapid results

For the identification of illicit drugs in forensic toxicological casework, analysis can be delayed and potentially compromised due to lengthy sample preparation. However a new technique has been developed that can provide high sensitivity and fast results. [More]
New technique quickly and cheaply detects illegal designer drugs

New technique quickly and cheaply detects illegal designer drugs

A new technique has been identified that quickly and cheaply recognizes illegal designer drugs that normally evade detection. [More]
Advances in POC diabetes testing: an interview with Gavin Jones

Advances in POC diabetes testing: an interview with Gavin Jones

Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) is well recognized as a reliable measure for glycemic control. The role of HbA1c testing in the management of patients with diabetes has been well established for several decades. HbA1c levels reflect the average circulating glucose concentration over the lifespan of... [More]
Scanning people's brains with fMRI more effective at spotting lies than traditional polygraph test

Scanning people's brains with fMRI more effective at spotting lies than traditional polygraph test

When it comes to lying, our brains are much more likely to give us away than sweaty palms or spikes in heart rate, new evidence from researchers in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania suggests. [More]
Nano-biointeraction and nanopathology

Nano-biointeraction and nanopathology

Nanoparticles enter the organism in a number of ways. In most cases through inhalation and ingestion. When inhaled, the majority of them are expelled with the next breath. When ingested, most of them are gotten rid of through feces. [More]
Researchers develop new analytical capabilities to identify chemical forms of mercury in human hair

Researchers develop new analytical capabilities to identify chemical forms of mercury in human hair

Mercury is a potent neurotoxin present in our daily lives and our body can accumulate it over the years. Food consumption, such as fish and rice, is the most common source of mercury exposure. [More]
Genevac’s miVac DNA concentrator improves forensic sample preparation

Genevac’s miVac DNA concentrator improves forensic sample preparation

Genevac report on a paper by UK researchers describing use of its miVac DNA concentrator to provide reliable and efficient sample preparation in the development of a novel forensic method to detect diclofenac residues in vultures and livestock animals. [More]
Tgen-NAU researchers produce anthrax genome sequence from victims of 1979 outbreak

Tgen-NAU researchers produce anthrax genome sequence from victims of 1979 outbreak

A new study by the Translational Genomics Research Institute and Northern Arizona University used deep DNA sequencing methods to generate the anthrax genome sequence from the victims of the 1979 anthrax outbreak in Sverdlovsk, Russia, when it was part of the USSR. [More]
Advances in brain research since patient HM: an interview with Dr Jacopo Annese

Advances in brain research since patient HM: an interview with Dr Jacopo Annese

Jacopo Annese, President and CEO of the Institute for Brain and Society, a non-profit organization dedicated to democratizing neuroscience and making neuroscience tools and knowledge about the brain more available to the public, discusses his work on the Human Brain Library. [More]
Females working in forensic science labs report high stress levels than male counterparts

Females working in forensic science labs report high stress levels than male counterparts

Women may be at the forefront of the fast-growing forensic science field, but they're also more stressed than their male counterparts, indicates new research led by a Michigan State University criminologist. [More]
Wake Forest Baptist scientists test prototype CEW with cardiac biomonitoring capability

Wake Forest Baptist scientists test prototype CEW with cardiac biomonitoring capability

Researchers at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center have successfully tested a prototype conducted electrical weapon (CEW) capable of recording a subject's heart rate and rhythm while still delivering incapacitating electrical charges. [More]
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