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New study explores sexual assault victimization among bisexual, gay college students

New study explores sexual assault victimization among bisexual, gay college students

A new study of sexual assault on college campuses found that nearly 2 of every 5 bisexual female college students experienced sexual assault after four years in college. About 1 in 4 gay and bisexual men are victims of sexual assault during college, which is similar to the frequency reported by heterosexual women, according to the study published in the journal Violence and Gender, from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. [More]
UCL researchers identify four genes that drive shape of human noses

UCL researchers identify four genes that drive shape of human noses

Genes that drive the shape of human noses have been identified by a UCL-led study. The four genes mainly affect the width and 'pointiness' of noses which vary greatly between different populations. The new information adds to our understanding of how the human face evolved and may help contribute to forensic DNA technologies that build visual profiles based on an individual's genetic makeup. [More]
Thermo Fisher Scientific reinforces ongoing commitment to make advanced technologies more accessible to customers

Thermo Fisher Scientific reinforces ongoing commitment to make advanced technologies more accessible to customers

Thermo Fisher Scientific Inc., the world leader in serving science, today reinforced its ongoing commitment to help its customers accelerate innovation and enhance productivity. [More]
Bruker showcases new products, analytical solutions for improved performance at Analytica 2016

Bruker showcases new products, analytical solutions for improved performance at Analytica 2016

This week at Analytica 2016, Bruker is showcasing new products and analytical solutions for improved performance and customer experience in pharmaceutical, industrial and applied markets. [More]

New technique can help analyze differences in mandible size and shape linked to gender

The scientific breakthrough, carried out by researchers at UGR and the Spanish National Research Council, is of great significance to the field of biological anthropology. It also has further implications for paleoanthropology, paleodemographics, forensic science and orthodontics, among other disciplines. [More]
Post-mortem toxicology screening has many phases

Post-mortem toxicology screening has many phases

Prince's autopsy was conducted by A. Quinn Strobl, MD, FCAP, a member of the College of American Pathologists. The results are expected to take at least two weeks, perhaps as many as six full weeks. This tragedy has people asking again "Why do toxicology results take so long?" [More]
Criminology theory to combat counterfeit, sub-standard medicines

Criminology theory to combat counterfeit, sub-standard medicines

Around the world, especially in developing nations, counterfeit medicines are a real problem. Until now, in many countries there hasn't been a standard protocol to conduct investigations and pursue prosecution. [More]
Forensic scientists find that HSV-1 strains could be useful for tracing a person's history

Forensic scientists find that HSV-1 strains could be useful for tracing a person's history

The genomes of two distinct strains of the virus that causes the common lip cold sore, herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), have been identified within the same person -- an achievement that could be useful to forensic scientists for tracing a person's history. [More]
Identification of elder abuse and neglect very crucial in emergency department

Identification of elder abuse and neglect very crucial in emergency department

When older adults in severely debilitated states show up for treatment in the emergency department, emergency physicians and staff must be able to identify and document their symptoms and decide whether to report their concerns to adult protective services. [More]
Forensic experts establish science-based standards to identify human remains using X-rays

Forensic experts establish science-based standards to identify human remains using X-rays

Forensic researchers have for the first time established science-based standards for identifying human remains based on X-rays of an individual's spine, upper leg or the side of the skull. [More]
AKT1 gene moderates mind-altering effects of smoking cannabis in young people

AKT1 gene moderates mind-altering effects of smoking cannabis in young people

Researchers at the University of Exeter and UCL (University College London) have identified a gene which can be used to predict how susceptible a young person is to the mind-altering effects of smoking cannabis. The finding could help identify otherwise healthy users who are most at risk of developing psychosis. [More]
Researchers find variability in definitions for reasonable medical threshold in child abuse cases

Researchers find variability in definitions for reasonable medical threshold in child abuse cases

Physicians use different definitions of "reasonable medical certainty" when testifying as expert witnesses in child abuse cases. The variability is troubling because it could result in flawed rulings, according to researchers at Penn State College of Medicine. [More]
Concussions related to sports and recreation activities affect millions of Americans

Concussions related to sports and recreation activities affect millions of Americans

Every year, between 3 million and 4 million Americans suffer concussions in sports and recreation. Head impacts and concussions caused by contact sports are a quickly growing epidemic among young athletes. [More]
NIST chemist develops portable kit for recovering traces of chemical evidence

NIST chemist develops portable kit for recovering traces of chemical evidence

A chemist at the National Institute of Standards and Technology has developed a portable version of his method for recovering trace chemicals such as environmental pollutants and forensic evidence including secret graves and arson fire debris. [More]
AngioDefender holds much promise for personalized cardiac care

AngioDefender holds much promise for personalized cardiac care

For a non-descript box it wields a mighty name and even more impressive possibilities for people with heart disease. Called the AngioDefender, the machine - no bigger than a shoebox - holds much promise in the ability to personalize cardiac care, say researchers at Lawson Health Research Institute, the research arm of St. Joseph's Health Care London. [More]
HealthSouth Round Rock informs individuals of possible theft of health information

HealthSouth Round Rock informs individuals of possible theft of health information

HealthSouth Rehabilitation Hospital of Round Rock, previously Reliant Rehabilitation Hospital Central Texas, is currently notifying potentially affected individuals that a laptop containing unsecured protected health information was stolen from the trunk of an employee's vehicle on or around Oct. 21, 2015. [More]
Researchers test new concept in type 2 diabetes patients going into remission

Researchers test new concept in type 2 diabetes patients going into remission

Remission is well-known as the goal in cancer treatment but scientists are discovering it's also an exciting possibility for those with type 2 diabetes. [More]

Honeywell acquires Sigma-Aldrich's laboratory research chemicals business

Honeywell today announced that it has completed the acquisition of the Seelze, Germany-based laboratory research chemicals business from Sigma-Aldrich, broadening Honeywell's offerings for high-purity solutions for drug discovery, medical diagnostic testing and other laboratory applications. [More]
Discovery may provide reliable 'clock' for forensic scientists

Discovery may provide reliable 'clock' for forensic scientists

Researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and University of Colorado Boulder have discovered that unique and changing microbial communities present during decomposition of human cadavers may provide a reliable "clock" for forensic scientists. The method could be used to estimate time of death in different seasons, as well determine the original location of moved corpses and help locate buried corpses. [More]
New test can detect drug abuse faster

New test can detect drug abuse faster

A new test for club drugs like ketamine can detect low levels of drugs in urine and plasma, making it faster, easier and cheaper to identify them. The authors of the study, published in Journal of Chromatography B, say it could give authorities the boost they need to keep up with trends drug (ab)use. [More]
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