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White House struggles to save health law

The Associated Press reports the president needs breakthroughs on three fronts: the cancellations and technology messes and the crisis in confidence among his own supporters. Meanwhile, The Wall Street Journal reports the White House is probing how the rollout flopped despite what they had believed was sufficient planning. [More]

First Edition: November 18, 2013

Today's headlines include reports about the political implications of the healthcare.gov difficulties as well continued coverage of reaction to President Barack Obama's policy cancellation fix. [More]

Epidemiological methods used during investigation of fatal injuries makes results more accurate

Epidemiological methods used during the investigation of fatal injuries makes the results more accurate, and allows for greater legal certainty of conclusions. Michael Freeman will address this as he defends his thesis at Umeå University, Sweden, on November 6. [More]

CDC and NIH collaborate to create Sudden Death in Young Registry

A registry of deaths in young people from conditions such as heart disease and epilepsy is being created to help researchers define the scope of the problem and set future research priorities. The National Institutes of Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are collaborating to create the Sudden Death in the Young Registry. [More]

Scientists identify dangerous amount of methamphetamine analog in workout supplement Craze

An international team of scientists have identified potentially dangerous amounts of methamphetamine analog in the workout supplement Craze, a product widely sold across the U.S. and online. [More]
Self-medication is key reason for prescription drug abuse in docs

Self-medication is key reason for prescription drug abuse in docs

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Report: Doctors who abuse prescription drugs often do so for "self-medication"

Report: Doctors who abuse prescription drugs often do so for "self-medication"

Doctors who abuse prescription drugs often do so for "self-medication"—whether for physical or emotional pain or stress relief, reports a study in the October Journal of Addiction Medicine, the official journal of the American Society of Addiction Medicine. [More]
Experiments with neutrons show antidepressant lithium accumulates strongly in white matter of the brain

Experiments with neutrons show antidepressant lithium accumulates strongly in white matter of the brain

At present lithium is most popular for its use in rechargeable batteries. But for decades now, lithium has also been used to treat various psychological diseases such as depressions, manias and bipolar disorders. But, the exact biological mode of action in certain brain regions has hardly been understood. It is well known that lithium lightens moods and reduces aggression potential. [More]

Microbial clock: New tool to determine time of death

An intriguing study led by the University of Colorado Boulder may provide a powerful new tool in the quiver of forensic scientists attempting to determine the time of death in cases involving human corpses: a microbial clock. [More]

TCSPP to offer online M.P.H program from 2014

With more than 17 programs in psychology and behavioral and health sciences already established, The Chicago School of Professional Psychology (TCSPP)—one of the leading nonprofit institutions of its kind-- is offering for the first time in its history a Master of Public Health (M.P.H.) Program beginning spring 2014 online and fall 2014 in Los Angeles. [More]
Sigma Life Science signs license agreement with Horizon Discovery for CompoZr ZFN technology

Sigma Life Science signs license agreement with Horizon Discovery for CompoZr ZFN technology

Sigma-Aldrich Corporation today announced that Sigma Life Science, its innovative biological products and services business, has entered a non-exclusive license agreement with Horizon Discovery for use of Sigma's CompoZr Zinc Finger Nuclease technology. [More]
New quick test promises to reduce economic, health burden of syphilis cases in Latin America

New quick test promises to reduce economic, health burden of syphilis cases in Latin America

Demystifying the chemical processes that create a wine's aroma, and the invaluable potential application of that understanding in winemaking, is the new objective of scientists in Uruguay who, with European partners, also recently sequenced the genome of the high-value Tannat grape, from which "the most healthy of red wines" are fermented. [More]
Sigma Life Science releases genome editing tool for screening and exploratory studies

Sigma Life Science releases genome editing tool for screening and exploratory studies

Sigma-Aldrich Corporation today announced that Sigma Life Science, its innovative biological products and services business, released Sigma CRISPRs, an inexpensive mammalian genome editing tool suitable for screening and exploratory studies. [More]

Viewpoints: Health law guarantees and UPS; 'delay coalition' offers GOP new playbook; Mayor Bloomberg urges Obama not to 'cave' on tobacco

It's not entirely clear why United Parcel Service Inc. (UPS) is blaming the Affordable Care Act for its decision to drop 15,000 of its workers' spouses from the company's health-insurance plan. ... It's possible, of course, that UPS is using the health-care law as a smokescreen for cutting costs it wanted to cut anyway. And at one point its internal memo takes an abnormal interest in other people's business. [More]

State highlights: Texas waits for feds' ok on higher Medicaid payments

California schools may give students insulin injections and other medications without having to call in licensed nurses, the state's highest court ruled Monday. … The unanimous decision was a defeat for the powerful California Nurses Assn., which had argued that only licensed health care workers could administer medicine under a state law that bars the unauthorized practice of nursing (Dolan, 8/12). [More]
Scientists use nanoparticles to regulate DNA interactions in self-assembly, drug-delivery

Scientists use nanoparticles to regulate DNA interactions in self-assembly, drug-delivery

A team of chemists in SU's Cf ollege oArts and Scientists has used a temperature-sensitive polymer to regulate DNA interactions in both a DNA-mediated assembly system and a DNA-encoded drug-delivery system. [More]
Professor to receive Janet L. Norwood Award for Outstanding Achievement by Woman in Statistical Sciences

Professor to receive Janet L. Norwood Award for Outstanding Achievement by Woman in Statistical Sciences

Carnegie Mellon University's Kathryn Roeder has been chosen to receive the Janet L. Norwood Award for Outstanding Achievement by a Woman in the Statistical Sciences. [More]
Discovery of hybrid cells in human melanoma

Discovery of hybrid cells in human melanoma

The University of Colorado Cancer Center along with Yale University and the Denver Crime Lab report in the journal PLOS ONE the first proof of cancer's ability to fuse with blood cells in a way that gives cancer the ability to travel, allowing previously stationary cancer cells to enter the bloodstream and seed sites of metastasis around the body. [More]
Gang members and violent men are more likely to suffer from mental disorder

Gang members and violent men are more likely to suffer from mental disorder

Young men who are gang members suffer unprecedented levels of psychiatric illness, placing a heavy burden on mental health services, according to new research led by Queen Mary, University of London. [More]

Studies show fewer mental health inpatients experience delayed discharge from hospital

Two studies a decade apart in England show fewer mental health inpatients are experiencing delayed discharge from hospital, although finding accommodation on discharge is a greater problem. [More]