Gene News and Research RSS Feed - Gene News and Research

A gene is a unit of heredity in a living organism. It normally resides on a stretch of DNA that codes for a type of protein or for an RNA chain that has a function in the organism. All living things depend on genes, as they specify all proteins and functional RNA chains.
Men with relatively unaggressive prostate tumors unlikely to develop metastatic prostate cancer

Men with relatively unaggressive prostate tumors unlikely to develop metastatic prostate cancer

Men with relatively unaggressive prostate tumors and whose disease is carefully monitored by urologists are unlikely to develop metastatic prostate cancer or die of their cancers, according to results of a study by researchers at the Brady Urological Institute at Johns Hopkins, who analyzed survival statistics up to 15 years. [More]
Researchers find genetic cause of previously unknown disease

Researchers find genetic cause of previously unknown disease

Researchers at the University of Oslo and Oslo University Hospital have found the genetic cause of a previously undescribed disease. With this, they have solved an over ten year old medical conundrum. [More]
Affinity tuning can make CAR T cells spare normal cells and attack cancer cells

Affinity tuning can make CAR T cells spare normal cells and attack cancer cells

A new development in engineering chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells, called affinity tuning, can make the CAR T cells spare normal cells and better recognize and attack cancer cells, which may help lower the toxicity associated with this type of immunotherapy when used against solid tumors, according to a preclinical study. [More]
Autism Speaks launches web-based portal for MSSNG database

Autism Speaks launches web-based portal for MSSNG database

Autism Speaks, the world's leading autism science and advocacy organization, today launched the web-based portal for its MSSNG database, making the resource available to researchers worldwide. [More]
Gene transfer therapy not beneficial for heart failure patients with reduced ejection fraction

Gene transfer therapy not beneficial for heart failure patients with reduced ejection fraction

Gene transfer therapy aimed at correcting an enzyme abnormality involved in myocardial contraction and relaxation did not improve outcomes in heart failure patients with reduced ejection fraction, results of the CUPID 2 study show. [More]
Gene therapy restores visual function in mouse model of LCA1

Gene therapy restores visual function in mouse model of LCA1

Mice lacking the protein retGC1, which is deficient in humans suffering Leber congenital amaurosis-1 (LCA1), a disorder that causes severe visual impairment beginning in infancy, received gene therapy to replace retGC1 and showed fully restored visual function that persisted for at least 6 months. [More]
UCSF-led team develops new technique to create tiny models of human tissues

UCSF-led team develops new technique to create tiny models of human tissues

A UCSF-led team has developed a technique to build tiny models of human tissues, called organoids, more precisely than ever before using a process that turns human cells into a biological equivalent of LEGO bricks. These mini-tissues in a dish can be used to study how particular structural features of tissue affect normal growth or go awry in cancer. They could be used for therapeutic drug screening and to help teach researchers how to grow whole human organs. [More]
Newly discovered prion causes Multiple System Atrophy

Newly discovered prion causes Multiple System Atrophy

Multiple System Atrophy (MSA), a neurodegenerative disorder with similarities to Parkinson's disease, is caused by a newly discovered type of prion, akin to the misfolded proteins involved in incurable progressive brain diseases such Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (CJD), according to two new research papers led by scientists at UC San Francisco. [More]
Researchers discover that vitamin D may play significant role in preventing AMD among women

Researchers discover that vitamin D may play significant role in preventing AMD among women

Vitamin D has been studied extensively in relation to bone health as well as cancer. Now, a team led by a researcher at the University at Buffalo has discovered that vitamin D may play a significant role in eye health, specifically in the possible prevention of age-related macular degeneration, or AMD, among women who are more genetically prone to developing the sight-damaging disease. [More]
MACC1 gene can help predict better treatment options for patients with Klatskin carcinoma

MACC1 gene can help predict better treatment options for patients with Klatskin carcinoma

Bile duct cancer is rare and is usually detected too late. Often only extensive liver surgery can help or, in rare cases, liver transplantation. But which patients will benefit from surgery and which will not, because their risk of cancer recurrence is too high? With the oncogene MACC1 as a biomarker, physicians for the first time have a tool to decide which treatment option is best for patients with Klatskin carcinoma, one type of bile duct cancer. [More]
CUMC vision researchers discover gene that causes myopia

CUMC vision researchers discover gene that causes myopia

Vision researchers at Columbia University Medical Center have discovered a gene that causes myopia, but only in people who spend a lot of time in childhood reading or doing other "nearwork." [More]
Gene linked to sudden cardiac death in general population identified using ICD monitoring

Gene linked to sudden cardiac death in general population identified using ICD monitoring

A gene associated with sudden cardiac death in the general population has been identified using implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) monitoring in research presented for the first time at ESC Congress today. [More]
Resverlogix presents new data on RVX-208 orally active BET inhibitor at ESC Congress 2015

Resverlogix presents new data on RVX-208 orally active BET inhibitor at ESC Congress 2015

Resverlogix Corp. is pleased to announce that Dr. Norman Wong, chief scientific officer of Resverlogix Corp. presented new data at the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Congress 2015 in a poster presentation titled: "RVX-208, an orally active BET inhibitor, lowers CVD risk by activities beyond raising ApoA-I/HDL." [More]
Gene ZSCAN4 may help treat Down syndrome

Gene ZSCAN4 may help treat Down syndrome

For people with Down syndrome, news from Elixirgen, LLC may brighten their day. The biotechnology company, located in the Science + Technology Park at Johns Hopkins, has outlined one of the best potential therapies yet for people with Down syndrome and other chromosome disorders in a paper entitled, "Correction of Down syndrome and Edwards syndrome aneuploidies in human cell cultures," published in the journal DNA Research. [More]
Regen BioPharma develops novel means of delivering RGBP-248 gene silencing nucleic acid to liver tumors

Regen BioPharma develops novel means of delivering RGBP-248 gene silencing nucleic acid to liver tumors

Regen BioPharma, Inc. announced today development of a novel means of delivering its patented (US Patent 8,263,571) gene silencing nucleic acid, RGBP-248, to liver tumors utilizing a clinically approved formulation as delivery system. The product in development overcomes previous hurdles with gene silencing therapeutics in which the gene silencing drug had to be delivered throughout the whole body. [More]
People with BPD traits have lowered activity in brain regions that support empathy

People with BPD traits have lowered activity in brain regions that support empathy

Those with borderline personality disorder, or BPD, a mental illness marked by unstable moods, often experience trouble maintaining interpersonal relationships. New research from the University of Georgia indicates that this may have to do with lowered brain activity in regions important for empathy in individuals with borderline personality traits. [More]
Fetal microchimerism could be a subtle and dizzyingly complex puzzle

Fetal microchimerism could be a subtle and dizzyingly complex puzzle

Parents go to great lengths to ensure the health and well-being of their developing offspring. The favor, however, may not always be returned. [More]
KAIST scientists predict how biological circuits sustain rhythms

KAIST scientists predict how biological circuits sustain rhythms

Our bodies have a variety of biological clocks that follow rhythms or oscillations with periods ranging from seconds to days. For example, our hearts beat every second, and cells divide periodically. The circadian clock located in the hypothalamus generates twenty-four hour rhythms, timing our sleep and hormone release. [More]
Researchers provide new insights into biology of aging, age-related diseases

Researchers provide new insights into biology of aging, age-related diseases

The scientific team of a new biotech company Gero in collaboration with one of the leading academics in the field of aging Prof. Robert J. Shmookler Reis (current world record holder in life extension for model animals - 10 fold for nematodes) has recently brought new insights into biology of aging and age-related diseases, primarily, around the stability and stress resistance of certain gene regulatory networks. [More]
Findings reveal a new way to prevent meningitis

Findings reveal a new way to prevent meningitis

The fungus Cryptococcus causes meningitis, a brain disease that kills about 1 million people each year — mainly those with impaired immune systems due to AIDS, cancer treatment or an organ transplant. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement