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A gene is a unit of heredity in a living organism. It normally resides on a stretch of DNA that codes for a type of protein or for an RNA chain that has a function in the organism. All living things depend on genes, as they specify all proteins and functional RNA chains.
People who carry longevity gene variant have larger brain region

People who carry longevity gene variant have larger brain region

People who carry a variant of a gene that is associated with longevity also have larger volumes in a front part of the brain involved in planning and decision-making, according to researchers at UC San Francisco. [More]
UCSD professor wins 2015 Japan Prize

UCSD professor wins 2015 Japan Prize

Theodore Friedmann, MD, professor in the Department of Pediatrics at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine was named today one of three recipients of the 2015 Japan Prize, a prestigious international award honoring laureates whose "original and outstanding achievements in science and technology have advanced the frontiers of knowledge and served the cause of peace and prosperity for mankind. [More]
Scientists publish catalog of genetic mutations found in head and neck cancers

Scientists publish catalog of genetic mutations found in head and neck cancers

Scientists have published the first comprehensive catalog of genetic mutations and other abnormal changes found in 279 cancers of the head and neck, and have identified several broken molecular pathways that might be targeted by existing and future cancer drugs. [More]
Primary care physicians unfamiliar with California breast density law, shows UC Davis study

Primary care physicians unfamiliar with California breast density law, shows UC Davis study

Ten months after California legislators enacted a controversial law mandating that radiologists notify women if they have dense breast tissue, UC Davis researchers have found that half of primary care physicians are still unfamiliar with the law and many don't feel comfortable answering breast density-related questions from patients. [More]
Scientists identify critical molecule that helps explain why diabetics suffer from non-healing wound

Scientists identify critical molecule that helps explain why diabetics suffer from non-healing wound

One of the most troubling complications of diabetes is its effect on wound healing. Roughly 15 percent of diabetics will suffer from a non-healing wound in their lifetime. In some cases, these open ulcers on the skin lead to amputations. [More]
Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome can be compared to normal aging, say scientists

Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome can be compared to normal aging, say scientists

In a new research study, scientists from Vision Genomics, LLC, Insilico Medicine, Inc., and Howard University showed that Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS or Progeria) is comparable to normal aging with respect to cellular signaling pathways, and that HGPS truly recapitulates the normal aging process. [More]
Researchers explore KRAS pathway to find potential target for treating lung cancer

Researchers explore KRAS pathway to find potential target for treating lung cancer

Despite the promise of the gene KRAS as a target for treating lung cancer, finding effective therapies has been challenging. Now researchers are traveling down the pathway to find what makes KRAS cancerous. [More]
Developmental salivary biomarkers linked to feeding success in newborns

Developmental salivary biomarkers linked to feeding success in newborns

Results from a study published online in the Journal of Pediatrics hold the potential to substantially improve clinical decision-making to determine when a premature newborn is ready for oral feeding. The study describes developmental salivary biomarkers associated with feeding success in newborns, markers that could lead to development of objective assessment tools for caregivers. [More]
Androgen receptor in prostate cancer cells can activate different gene set when bound to antiandrogens

Androgen receptor in prostate cancer cells can activate different gene set when bound to antiandrogens

The androgen receptor in prostate cancer cells can activate different sets of genes depending on whether it binds with an androgen hormone or an antiandrogen drug, according to a new study led by researchers at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute. [More]
Purdue University researchers find promising way to treat late-stage prostate cancer

Purdue University researchers find promising way to treat late-stage prostate cancer

Low doses of metformin, a widely used diabetes medication, and a gene inhibitor known as BI2536 can successfully halt the growth of late-stage prostate cancer tumors, a Purdue University study finds. [More]
Georgia Tech researchers unveil new version of genome annotation system

Georgia Tech researchers unveil new version of genome annotation system

Georgia Tech researchers, working with colleagues in the National Center for Biotechnology Information, have released a new version of a genome annotation system capable of analyzing more than 2,000 prokaryotic genomes per day, helping researchers accelerate prokaryotic genomics-based studies worldwide. [More]
UNC researchers discover how two genes interact to trigger worst form of ovarian cancer

UNC researchers discover how two genes interact to trigger worst form of ovarian cancer

In the battle against ovarian cancer, UNC School of Medicine researchers have created the first mouse model of the worst form of the disease and found a potential route to better treatments and much-needed diagnostic screens. [More]
Penn scientists explore potential therapeutic target for cerebral cavernous malformations

Penn scientists explore potential therapeutic target for cerebral cavernous malformations

Tens of millions of people around the world have abnormal, leak-prone sproutings of blood vessels in the brain called cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs). These abnormal growths can lead to seizures, strokes, hemorrhages, and other serious conditions, yet their precise molecular cause has never been determined. [More]
Increased levels of stress hormones in mother can affect foetal development

Increased levels of stress hormones in mother can affect foetal development

Increased levels of stress hormones can lead pregnant mice to overeat, but affect growth of the foetus and, potentially, the long term health of her offspring, according to a study published today. [More]
Imperial College professor honored with Helmholtz International Fellow Award

Imperial College professor honored with Helmholtz International Fellow Award

The British cell biologist Professor Amanda Gay Fisher of Imperial College London has been honored with the Helmholtz International Fellow Award for her excellent research. Fisher is one of seven outstanding researchers from abroad who received the award, each of which is endowed with 20,000 euros. According to the Helmholtz Association, Germany's largest scientific organization, the award also includes an invitation to visit one or several Helmholtz research centers. [More]
BRCA1/2 analysis: an interview with Jurgi Camblong, CEO of Sophia Genetics

BRCA1/2 analysis: an interview with Jurgi Camblong, CEO of Sophia Genetics

BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes are two of the most well studied genes in the cancer field. They are tumor suppressors - mutations in these genes can lead to breast and/or ovarian cancer. Predispositions can be detected in women before they develop cancer. [More]
International scientists take new path in epilepsy research

International scientists take new path in epilepsy research

An international team of scientists together with the University of Bonn Hospital have taken a new path in the research into causes of epilepsy: The researchers determined the networks of the active genes and, like a dragnet, looked for the "main perpetrators" using a computer model. [More]
SLU researcher discovers new information about how antibiotics stop staph infections

SLU researcher discovers new information about how antibiotics stop staph infections

In research published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, assistant professor of biochemistry and molecular biology at Saint Louis University Mee-Ngan F. Yap, Ph.D., discovered new information about how antibiotics like azithromycin stop staph infections, and why staph sometimes becomes resistant to drugs. [More]
New research could help pave way to new cancer therapies

New research could help pave way to new cancer therapies

New research from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem shows that the most common form of white blood cells, called neutrophils, contain many different subtypes, of which some fight the development of cancer and others promote its progression. The research could help pave the way to new therapies that fight cancer by increasing anti-tumor neutrophils while limiting pro-tumor neutrophils. [More]
Altered AHNAK gene may open door to improved treatment for keloid scars

Altered AHNAK gene may open door to improved treatment for keloid scars

Researchers at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit have identified a gene that may offer a better understanding of how keloid scars develop and potentially open the door to improved treatment for the often painful, itchy and tender scars. [More]