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A gene is a unit of heredity in a living organism. It normally resides on a stretch of DNA that codes for a type of protein or for an RNA chain that has a function in the organism. All living things depend on genes, as they specify all proteins and functional RNA chains.
New study identifies genetic link to peanut allergy

New study identifies genetic link to peanut allergy

Researchers have pinpointed a region in the human genome associated with peanut allergy in U.S. children, offering strong evidence that genes can play a role in the development of food allergies. [More]
New TAU study may offer hope to people diagnosed with Glioblastoma multiforme

New TAU study may offer hope to people diagnosed with Glioblastoma multiforme

There are no effective available treatments for sufferers of Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most aggressive and devastating form of brain tumor. The disease, always fatal, has a survival rate of only 6-18 months. [More]
Study: Gene variant linked to increased risk of vincristine-induced peripheral neuropathy in children

Study: Gene variant linked to increased risk of vincristine-induced peripheral neuropathy in children

Children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia who had a certain gene variant experienced a higher incidence and severity of peripheral neuropathy after receiving treatment with the cancer drug vincristine, according to a study in the February 24 issue of JAMA. [More]
Study shows that even breast cancers with few androgen receptors benefit from anti-androgen therapy

Study shows that even breast cancers with few androgen receptors benefit from anti-androgen therapy

A University of Colorado Cancer Center study published today in the journal Molecular Cancer Therapeutics shows that only about 1 percent of triple-negative breast cancer cells in a tumor must be "androgen-receptor-positive" to show benefit from anti-androgen therapies. [More]
Changes to DNA sequence associated with peanut allergy

Changes to DNA sequence associated with peanut allergy

Research funded by the National Institutes of Health suggests that changes in a small region of chromosome 6 are risk factors for peanut allergy in U.S. children of European descent. The genetic risk area is located among two tightly linked genes that regulate the presentation of allergens and microbial products to the immune system. This study is the first to use a genome-wide screening approach in patients with well-defined food allergy to identify risks for peanut allergy. [More]
PCF announces Challenge Awards to support research on new treatment strategies for prostate cancer

PCF announces Challenge Awards to support research on new treatment strategies for prostate cancer

The Prostate Cancer Foundation (PCF) announces 3 new Challenge Awards to support discoveries for the treatment of lethal prostate cancer. [More]
Serous ovarian cancer is more deadly, shows Cancer Research UK study

Serous ovarian cancer is more deadly, shows Cancer Research UK study

THE most common type of ovarian cancer is more deadly if it consists of a patchwork of different groups of cells, according to a Cancer Research UK study published today (Tuesday) in PLOS Medicine. [More]
Researchers identify first genetic variation linked to increased risk of peripheral neuropathy

Researchers identify first genetic variation linked to increased risk of peripheral neuropathy

Researchers have identified the first genetic variation that is associated with increased risk and severity of peripheral neuropathy following treatment with a widely used anti-cancer drug. Investigators also found evidence of how it may be possible to protect young leukemia patients without jeopardizing cures. [More]
N30 Pharmaceuticals becomes Nivalis Therapeutics

N30 Pharmaceuticals becomes Nivalis Therapeutics

N30 Pharmaceuticals, Inc., a clinical-stage pharmaceutical company focused on the development of product candidates for cystic fibrosis (CF), announced today that the Company has changed its name to Nivalis Therapeutics, Inc. The Company's lead product candidate, N91115, is a novel inhibitor of S-nitrosoglutathione reductase (GSNOR). [More]
Agena releases MassARRAY 24-Well System for mass spectrometry-based genetic testing

Agena releases MassARRAY 24-Well System for mass spectrometry-based genetic testing

Agena Bioscience today released the MassARRAY 24-Well System for mass spectrometry-based genetic analysis, adding to its existing MassARRAY portfolio. The new 24-well format is tailored to smaller clinical testing laboratories requiring modest sample throughput, reduced initial hardware costs, and reduced time to result. [More]
Johns Hopkins scientists identify genetic pathway that may spur cancer cell growth in children

Johns Hopkins scientists identify genetic pathway that may spur cancer cell growth in children

Working with cells taken from children with a very rare but ferocious form of brain cancer, Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center scientists have identified a genetic pathway that acts as a master regulator of thousands of other genes and may spur cancer cell growth and resistance to anticancer treatment. [More]
Epigenome plays significant part in embryonic development

Epigenome plays significant part in embryonic development

The early stages of embryonic development shape our cells and tissues for life. It is during this time that our newly formed cells are transformed into heart, skin, nerve or other cell types. Scientists are finding that this process is largely controlled not by the genome, but by the epigenome, chemical markers on DNA that tell cells when to turn genes on and off. [More]
Researchers find key protein critical to the success of common anti-platelet drug Plavix

Researchers find key protein critical to the success of common anti-platelet drug Plavix

Researchers at the UNC School of Medicine have found that the blood platelet protein Rasa3 is critical to the success of the common anti-platelet drug Plavix, which breaks up blood clots during heart attacks and other arterial diseases. [More]
MD Anderson researchers find way to predict patients who may respond to BRAF inhibitors

MD Anderson researchers find way to predict patients who may respond to BRAF inhibitors

Powerful drugs known as BRAF-inhibitors have been crucial for melanoma patients, saving lives through their ability to turn off the BRAF protein's power to spur cancer cell growth. [More]
Virginia Tech biochemists identify potential drug target against sleeping sickness

Virginia Tech biochemists identify potential drug target against sleeping sickness

Virginia Tech biochemists are trying to deliver a stern wake-up call to the parasite that causes sleeping sickness. [More]
Finding opens avenues of research toward precision treatments to boost life expectancy for CF patients

Finding opens avenues of research toward precision treatments to boost life expectancy for CF patients

Mutation of one gene is all it takes to get cystic fibrosis (CF), but disease severity depends on many other genes and proteins. For the first time, researchers at the UNC School of Medicine have identified genetic pathways - or clusters of genes - that play major roles in why one person with CF might never experience the worse kinds of symptoms while another person will battle severe airway infection for a lifetime. [More]
‘Most’ cirrhotic HBV patients benefit from adding adefovir to lamivudine

‘Most’ cirrhotic HBV patients benefit from adding adefovir to lamivudine

Response-guided addition of adefovir to lamivudine-based therapy not only maintains long-term viral suppression in Chinese chronic hepatitis B patients with compensated liver cirrhosis, research suggests, but also improves liver function. [More]
Researchers develop targeted approach that allows muscle to burn more energy

Researchers develop targeted approach that allows muscle to burn more energy

What started as an evolutionary protection against starvation has become a biological "bad joke" for people who need to lose weight. The human body doesn't distinguish between dieting and possible starvation, so when there is a decrease in calories consumed, human metabolism increases its energy efficiency and weight loss is resisted. [More]
Mayo Clinic researchers identify molecule that lays groundwork for development of pancreatic cancer

Mayo Clinic researchers identify molecule that lays groundwork for development of pancreatic cancer

A research team led by investigators from Mayo Clinic's campus in Jacksonville, Florida, and the University of Oslo, Norway, have identified a molecule that pushes normal pancreatic cells to transform their shape, laying the groundwork for development of pancreatic cancer -- one of the most difficult tumors to treat. [More]
23andMe granted FDA approval to market direct-to-consumer genetic test under novel device classification

23andMe granted FDA approval to market direct-to-consumer genetic test under novel device classification

23andMe, Inc., the leading personal genetics company, today announced that it has been granted authority by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to market the first direct-to-consumer genetic test under a regulatory classification for novel devices. [More]