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A gene is a unit of heredity in a living organism. It normally resides on a stretch of DNA that codes for a type of protein or for an RNA chain that has a function in the organism. All living things depend on genes, as they specify all proteins and functional RNA chains.
Research findings could help guide development of potential treatments for HCV

Research findings could help guide development of potential treatments for HCV

Warring armies use a variety of tactics as they struggle to gain the upper hand. Among their tricks is to attack with a decoy force that occupies the defenders while an unseen force launches a separate attack that the defenders fail to notice. [More]
Congress needs to act to incentivize development of genomic data systems

Congress needs to act to incentivize development of genomic data systems

The latest generation of genomic testing offers a chance for significant improvements in patient care, disease prevention, and possibly even the cost-effectiveness of healthcare, but Congress needs to act to incentivize the development of the massive data systems that doctors and regulators will need in order to make these tests safe and effective for patients. [More]
Progression of different types of breast cancer influenced differently by tumor microenvironment

Progression of different types of breast cancer influenced differently by tumor microenvironment

Our environment can have a major impact on how we develop, and it turns out it's no different for cancer cells. In work published today in Neoplasia, a team of researchers led by Associate Professor Mikala Egeblad at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory found that two different mouse models of breast cancer progressed differently based on characteristics of the tumor microenvironment - the area of tissue in which the tumor is embedded. [More]
Brigatinib drug shows promise against ALK+ non-small cell lung cancer in phase I/II clinical trial

Brigatinib drug shows promise against ALK+ non-small cell lung cancer in phase I/II clinical trial

Phase I/II clinical trial results reported at the American Society for Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting 2015 show promising results for investigational drug brigatinib against ALK+ non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), with 58 of 78 ALK+ patients responding to treatment, including 50 of 70 patients who had progressed after previous treatment with crizotinib, the first licensed ALK inhibitor. [More]
Airway and systemic inflammation predict COPD exacerbation

Airway and systemic inflammation predict COPD exacerbation

Researchers have found a link between increased airway and systemic inflammation and frequent exacerbations in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. [More]
Researchers use animal models to study how dysfunction of genes contributes to ASD risk

Researchers use animal models to study how dysfunction of genes contributes to ASD risk

Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is a neurological condition that affects approximately two percent of people around the world. Although several genes have been linked to multiple concurring conditions of ASD, the process that explains how specific genetic variants lead to behaviors characteristic of the disorder remains elusive. [More]
Strand Life Sciences to launch expanded StrandAdvantage pan-cancer genomic profiling service at ASCO 2015

Strand Life Sciences to launch expanded StrandAdvantage pan-cancer genomic profiling service at ASCO 2015

Strand Life Sciences, a global genomic profiling company that uses next generation sequencing technology to empower cancer care, today announced it will introduce its expanded StrandAdvantage pan-cancer genomic profiling service later this month at the 2015 American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting in Chicago. [More]
Six research teams awarded grant to accelerate discovery of new drugs for brain, nervous system disorders

Six research teams awarded grant to accelerate discovery of new drugs for brain, nervous system disorders

CQDM, Brain Canada and the Ontario Brain Institute award close to $8.5M to six (6) multi-disciplinary and multi-provincial research teams across Canada to address unmet needs in neuroscience within their Focus on Brain strategic initiative. To this amount, $1.5M is added from the various research entities involved as in-kind contributions. [More]
Ceres receives U.S. patent for genetic sequence obtained from soybean

Ceres receives U.S. patent for genetic sequence obtained from soybean

Ceres, Inc., an agricultural biotechnology company, has been awarded a U.S. patent for a genetic sequence derived from soybean, covering uses of the gene in areas such as research, product development and plant transformation. [More]
Not feeling pain due to genetic mutation may not be a blessing

Not feeling pain due to genetic mutation may not be a blessing

A rare congenital genetic mutation means that those affected do not feel pain. However, what seems, at first sight, to be a blessing, can have serious consequences. It means that injuries or diseases can go undetected for a long time. The affected gene was identified by an international research team from MedUni Vienna, the University of Munich and the University of Cambridge. [More]
Researchers present new program to evaluate clinical relevance of genetic variants

Researchers present new program to evaluate clinical relevance of genetic variants

Millions of genetic variants have been discovered over the last 25 years, but interpreting the clinical impact of the differences in a person's genome remains a major bottleneck in genomic medicine. In a paper published in The New England Journal of Medicine on May 27, a consortium including investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital and Partners HealthCare present ClinGen, a program to evaluate the clinical relevance of genetic variants for use in precision medicine and research. [More]
UC San Diego Health System designated as Center of Excellence for Huntington's disease

UC San Diego Health System designated as Center of Excellence for Huntington's disease

The Huntington's Disease Clinical Research Center at UC San Diego Health System has been designated a Center of Excellence by the Huntington's Disease Society of America. UC San Diego was one of only 29 centers nationwide to receive this prestigious designation, which recognizes centers for their elite multidisciplinary approach to Huntington's disease care and research. [More]
Scientists identify molecular 'lock' that enables Ebola virus to gain entry to cells

Scientists identify molecular 'lock' that enables Ebola virus to gain entry to cells

An international team including scientists from Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University and the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases has identified the molecular "lock" that the deadly Ebola virus must pick to gain entry to cells. [More]
NYU chemists find that microRNA can serve as 'decoder ring' for understanding biological functions

NYU chemists find that microRNA can serve as 'decoder ring' for understanding biological functions

MicroRNA can serve as a "decoder ring" for understanding complex biological processes, a team of New York University chemists has found. Their study, which appears in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, points to a new method for decrypting the biological functions of enzymes and identifying those that drive diseases. [More]
New stem-cell based therapy provides pain relief, reduces severity of RDEB in children

New stem-cell based therapy provides pain relief, reduces severity of RDEB in children

Promising results from a trial of a new stem-cell based therapy for a rare and debilitating skin condition have been published in the Journal of Investigative Dermatology. The therapy, involving infusions of stem cells, was found to provide pain relief and to reduce the severity of this skin condition for which no cure currently exists. [More]
Study explores how one genome could produce three different castes within bumblebees

Study explores how one genome could produce three different castes within bumblebees

Biologists from the University of Leicester have discovered that one of nature's most important pollinators - the buff-tailed bumblebee - either ascends to the status of queen or remains a lowly worker bee based on which genes are 'turned on' during its lifespan. [More]
UVA scientists find blueprint for combating human disease using DNA clad in near-indestructible armor

UVA scientists find blueprint for combating human disease using DNA clad in near-indestructible armor

By unlocking the secrets of a bizarre virus that survives in nearly boiling acid, scientists at the University of Virginia School of Medicine have found a blueprint for battling human disease using DNA clad in near-indestructible armor. [More]
Study reveals molecular basis for endocrine therapy-resistant breast cancer

Study reveals molecular basis for endocrine therapy-resistant breast cancer

Mitsuyoshi Nakao, Director of the Institute of Molecular Embryology and Genetics in Kumamoto University and Associate Professor Noriko Saitoh revealed that a cluster of defined, non-coding RNAs are mechanistically involved in endocrine therapy resistance in human breast cancer cells. Furthermore, resveratrol, a kind of polyphenol, was found to repress these RNAs and inhibit the proliferative activity of breast cancer cells which had acquired resistance. [More]
Pitt scientists identify two new classes of RNAs closely associated with cancer biomarker

Pitt scientists identify two new classes of RNAs closely associated with cancer biomarker

Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine have identified two new classes of RNAs that are closely associated with a protein known to be a prognostic biomarker for breast cancer and could play a role in progression of prostate cancer. [More]
Alternative generic strategy for breast cancer treatment

Alternative generic strategy for breast cancer treatment

Maxing out the inherently stressed nature of treatment-resistant breast cancer cells thwarts their adaptive ability to evolve genetic workarounds to treatment, a new study suggests. [More]
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