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A gene is a unit of heredity in a living organism. It normally resides on a stretch of DNA that codes for a type of protein or for an RNA chain that has a function in the organism. All living things depend on genes, as they specify all proteins and functional RNA chains.
Lund University researchers explore personalised treatment for type 2 diabetes

Lund University researchers explore personalised treatment for type 2 diabetes

Researchers at Lund University in Sweden are testing a treatment for type 2 diabetes which targets the disease mechanism itself - and not just the symptoms. For the first time, knowledge about the individual patient's genetic risk profile is being used. The treatment completely restores the capacity to secrete insulin, which is impaired by the risk gene. [More]
Gene in soil-dwelling amoeba may hold key to isolating cancerous tumors

Gene in soil-dwelling amoeba may hold key to isolating cancerous tumors

The dirt in your backyard may hold the key to isolating cancerous tumors and to potential new treatments for a host of cancers. [More]
Proteins linked to severe forms of ALS are less stable, suggests new study

Proteins linked to severe forms of ALS are less stable, suggests new study

A new study by scientists from The Scripps Research Institute, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and other institutions suggests a cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease. [More]
Research finding offers new insights into the cause of glioblastoma

Research finding offers new insights into the cause of glioblastoma

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have identified a new fusion protein found in approximately 15 percent of secondary glioblastomas or brain tumors. The finding offers new insights into the cause of this cancer and provides a therapeutic target for personalized oncologic care. [More]
New culture system confirms amyloid theory, can revolutionize drug discovery for Alzheimer's disease

New culture system confirms amyloid theory, can revolutionize drug discovery for Alzheimer's disease

An innovative laboratory culture system has succeeded, for the first time, in reproducing the full course of events underlying the development of Alzheimer's disease. [More]
BGI issued patent for non-invasive prenatal genetic test technology

BGI issued patent for non-invasive prenatal genetic test technology

The European Patent Office has issued patent number EP2561103B1 for invention to BGI for its independently researched non-invasive prenatal genetic test (NIPT) technology. This technology has been developed by BGI in connection with the provision of its market leading NIPT, the NIFTY test. [More]
Four UCLA researchers receive NIH Director's New Innovator Award

Four UCLA researchers receive NIH Director's New Innovator Award

Four scientists from the Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA have received a National Institutes of Health Director's New Innovator Award that will forward revolutionary stem cell and neuro-science in medicine. [More]
Recent clinical study sheds light on potential approach to more personalized care for pancreatic cancer

Recent clinical study sheds light on potential approach to more personalized care for pancreatic cancer

Pancreatic cancer is one of the deadliest cancers. Even with aggressive treatment, the prognosis is poor, with various factors stacking the odds against successful treatment: early detection is uncommon, it tends to spread quickly and recurrence is likely. However, several newer approaches show promise in increasing the response rate to pancreatic cancer treatment. [More]
Synthetic oil triheptanoin improves Rett syndrome, longevity

Synthetic oil triheptanoin improves Rett syndrome, longevity

When young mice with the rodent equivalent of a rare autism spectrum disorder (ASD), called Rett syndrome, were fed a diet supplemented with the synthetic oil triheptanoin, they lived longer than mice on regular diets. Importantly, their physical and behavioral symptoms were also less severe after being on the diet, according to results of new research from The Johns Hopkins University. [More]
New UCLA study reveals why people with autism experience neural stem cell overgrowth after birth

New UCLA study reveals why people with autism experience neural stem cell overgrowth after birth

People with autism spectrum disorder often experience a period of accelerated brain growth after birth. No one knows why, or whether the change is linked to any specific behavioral changes. [More]
Neurobiologist Michael Meaney wins 2014 Klaus J. Jacobs Research Prize

Neurobiologist Michael Meaney wins 2014 Klaus J. Jacobs Research Prize

Neurobiologist Michael Meaney (McGill University and Douglas Mental Health University Institute), a senior fellow of the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research, has won a major award worth $1.16 million Canadian for his research on how early childhood experiences shape biological development. [More]
Isis Pharmaceuticals provides update on Phase 2 clinical studies of ISIS-SMN Rx in children with SMA

Isis Pharmaceuticals provides update on Phase 2 clinical studies of ISIS-SMN Rx in children with SMA

Isis Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today provided an update on its ongoing open-label Phase 2 clinical studies of ISIS-SMN Rx in infants and children with spinal muscular atrophy at the 19th International World Muscle Society (WMS) Congress in Berlin, Germany. [More]
UChicago awarded $12 million grant to establish national center to study drug abuse-related behaviors

UChicago awarded $12 million grant to establish national center to study drug abuse-related behaviors

The National Institute on Drug Abuse has awarded the University of Chicago a $12 million, five year grant to establish a national Center of Excellence to study drug abuse-associated behaviors by conducting research with rats. [More]
CUMC researchers use innovative algorithm to find driving force behind aggressive form of glioblastoma

CUMC researchers use innovative algorithm to find driving force behind aggressive form of glioblastoma

Using an innovative algorithm that analyzes gene regulatory and signaling networks, Columbia University Medical Center researchers have found that loss of a gene called KLHL9 is the driving force behind the most aggressive form of glioblastoma, the most common form of brain cancer. [More]
Study addresses the challenge of genomic heterogeneity

Study addresses the challenge of genomic heterogeneity

Known cancer-driving genomic aberrations in localized lung cancer appear to be so consistently present across tumors that a single biopsy of one region of the tumor is likely to identify most of them, according to a paper published today in Science. [More]
Scientists use novel way to identify new gene linked to Alzheimer's

Scientists use novel way to identify new gene linked to Alzheimer's

Scientists at The University of Manchester have used a new way of working to identify a new gene linked to neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's. The discovery fills in another piece of the jigsaw when it comes to identifying people most at risk of developing the condition. [More]
CTCs in blood of metastatic cancer patients give genomic read-out of breast cancer

CTCs in blood of metastatic cancer patients give genomic read-out of breast cancer

The genetic fingerprint of a metastatic cancer is constantly changing, which means that the therapy that may have stopped a patient's cancer growth today, won't necessarily work tomorrow. [More]
GE Healthcare-Glaxo Smith Kline deal to create force in cancer testing

GE Healthcare-Glaxo Smith Kline deal to create force in cancer testing

A recently announced deal between GE Healthcare-subsidiary Clarient and Glaxo Smith Kline will create a force in cancer testing, according to Kalorama Information. The healthcare market research publisher tracks companion products, and says that the two entities will form a multi-purpose, data analytics- and companion diagnostics-driven network of laboratories. Kalorama Information recently released a market study, Companion Diagnostics Market, for companion diagnostics such as the drug-test combinations envisioned in this deal. [More]
Specific perceptual learning deficit associated with Fragile X Syndrome

Specific perceptual learning deficit associated with Fragile X Syndrome

Researchers at Children's Hospital Los Angeles have described for the first time a specific perceptual learning deficit in mice with a mutation of the same gene as found in children with Fragile X Syndrome (FXS). [More]
BRCA mutations carry risks for salivary gland cancer, breast cancer

BRCA mutations carry risks for salivary gland cancer, breast cancer

The risk of developing cancer in a salivary gland might be higher in people with mutations in either of two genes associated with breast and ovarian cancer, according to a new study by researchers at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center – Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute. [More]