Gene Expression News and Research RSS Feed - Gene Expression News and Research

Gene Expression is the process by which a gene gets turned on in a cell to make RNA and proteins. Gene expression may be measured by looking at the RNA, or the protein made from the RNA, or what the protein does in a cell.
Salk Institute researchers reveal how to curb immune enthusiasm

Salk Institute researchers reveal how to curb immune enthusiasm

Normally when we think of viruses, from the common cold to HIV, we want to boost people's immunity to fight them. [More]
Salk scientists show how microenvironment signals encourage growth of pancreatic tumors

Salk scientists show how microenvironment signals encourage growth of pancreatic tumors

Just as an invasive weed might need nutrient-rich soil and water to grow, many cancers rely on the right surroundings in the body to thrive. [More]
New research exposes cellular responses linked to bird flu vaccine

New research exposes cellular responses linked to bird flu vaccine

New research from Vanderbilt eavesdrops on gene expression in human immune system cells before and after vaccination against bird flu. [More]
UC biologists use frog models to study how early stressors may play role in onset of adult diseases

UC biologists use frog models to study how early stressors may play role in onset of adult diseases

UC biologists have turned to amphibian sources -- specifically frogs and tadpoles -- to help shed light on how early stressors in the womb and shortly after birth may play a part in the onset of adult diseases such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease. [More]
Researchers show how adult learning is impaired in females using mouse models of Rett syndrome

Researchers show how adult learning is impaired in females using mouse models of Rett syndrome

Neurodevelopmental disorders like autism very likely have their origin at the dawn of life, with the emergence of inappropriate connectivity between nerve cells in the brain. [More]
Researchers identify brain cell types from cell culture of adult human neurons

Researchers identify brain cell types from cell culture of adult human neurons

Studying brain disorders in people and developing drugs to treat them has been slowed by the inability to investigate single living cells from adult patients [More]
People with metabolic syndrome may need more vitamin E, new research shows

People with metabolic syndrome may need more vitamin E, new research shows

New research has shown that people with metabolic syndrome need significantly more vitamin E - which could be a serious public health concern, in light of the millions of people who have this condition that's often related to obesity. [More]
Researchers explore how metastatic pancreatic cancer gets ‘reprogrammed’ for optimal malignancy

Researchers explore how metastatic pancreatic cancer gets ‘reprogrammed’ for optimal malignancy

Metastatic pancreatic cancer -- cancer that has spread from the pancreas to other tissues and is responsible for most patient deaths -- changes its metabolism and is "reprogrammed" for optimal malignancy, according to new findings reported Jan. 16 in Nature Genetics. [More]
Nanoparticle exposure can trigger dormant viruses in lung tissue cells

Nanoparticle exposure can trigger dormant viruses in lung tissue cells

Nanoparticles from combustion engines can activate viruses that are dormant in lung tissue cells. This is the result of a study by researchers of Helmholtz Zentrum München, a partner in the German Center for Lung Research, which has now been published in the journal 'Particle and Fibre Toxicology'. [More]
Endogenous retroviruses may have played significant role in development of the brain

Endogenous retroviruses may have played significant role in development of the brain

Over millions of years retroviruses have been incorporated into our human DNA, where they today make up almost 10 per cent of the total genome. [More]
Equipment for single-cell genomics launched by Illumina and Bio-Rad

Equipment for single-cell genomics launched by Illumina and Bio-Rad

Illumina, Inc. and Bio-Rad Laboratories, Inc. today announced the launch of the Illumina® Bio-Rad® Single-Cell Sequencing Solution at the J.P. Morgan Healthcare Conference. The comprehensive solution is the first next-generation sequencing (NGS) workflow for single-cell analysis, providing researchers the ability to investigate the coordinated contribution of individual cells in tissue function, disease progression, and therapeutic response. [More]
Inhibition of EZH2 protein could be new strategy to treat multiple myeloma

Inhibition of EZH2 protein could be new strategy to treat multiple myeloma

In a study published in the scientific journal Oncotarget, researchers from Uppsala University show how the protein EZH2 affects the development of multiple myeloma, and that inhibition of EZH2 could be used as a new strategy to treat the disease. [More]
Real-time study of medaka fish aboard ISS sheds light on bone metabolism under microgravity

Real-time study of medaka fish aboard ISS sheds light on bone metabolism under microgravity

Tokyo Institute of Technology research: Gravitational biology: Real time imaging and transcriptome analysis of medaka aboard space station [More]
Researchers identify new subgroup of cervical cancers with different genetic features

Researchers identify new subgroup of cervical cancers with different genetic features

A team of University of South Carolina scientists led by Carolyn Banister and Phillip Buckhaults has identified a new subtype of cervical cancer that, like most cervical cancers, is triggered by human papillomavirus (HPV) but whose growth is not directed by the virus, suggesting that therapy targeting these tumors' distinct genomic pathways may improve patient outcomes over standard treatment. [More]
Scientists identify molecular pathway in the brain that may help find better treatments for dementia

Scientists identify molecular pathway in the brain that may help find better treatments for dementia

Rutgers University scientists have discovered a molecular pathway in the brain that may help provide answers to long-term memory problems in the elderly and aid researchers in identifying drug-based therapies to prevent dementia. [More]
Epigenetic changes favor development of fatty liver in humans and mice

Epigenetic changes favor development of fatty liver in humans and mice

Mice with a strong tendency to obesity already exhibit epigenetic changes at six weeks of age, inducing the liver to amplify its production of the enzyme DPP4 and release it into the circulation. Over the long term, this favors the development of a fatty liver. [More]
FDA-approved, bioengineered living-cell therapy can shift genomic profile of non-healing wounds

FDA-approved, bioengineered living-cell therapy can shift genomic profile of non-healing wounds

Apligraf - an FDA-approved, bioengineered living-cell therapy from Organogenesis Inc. - has become the first wound-healing therapy to demonstrate a significant change in the genomic profile of a treated non-healing wound, according to new research published in the peer-reviewed journal Science Translational Medicine. [More]
How does the brain control appetite?

How does the brain control appetite?

Energy balance between energy intake and expenditure in our bodies is important for maintaining energy homeostasis to keep our bodies functioning properly. The appetite determines how much we eat, the energy intake, by communication between the brain and body. [More]
Research findings on sweat glands have potential to improve methods for culturing skin grafts

Research findings on sweat glands have potential to improve methods for culturing skin grafts

As early humans shed the hairy coats of their closest evolutionary ancestors, they also gained a distinct feature that would prove critical to their success: a type of sweat gland that allows the body to cool down quickly. Those tiny glands are enormously useful, allowing us to live in a wide variety of climates, and enabling us to run long distances. [More]
Study shows new role of zinc in optic nerve injury

Study shows new role of zinc in optic nerve injury

For more than two decades, researchers have tried to regenerate the injured optic nerve using different growth factors and/or agents that overcome natural growth inhibition. [More]
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