Gene Expression News and Research RSS Feed - Gene Expression News and Research

Gene Expression is the process by which a gene gets turned on in a cell to make RNA and proteins. Gene expression may be measured by looking at the RNA, or the protein made from the RNA, or what the protein does in a cell.
TET1 enzyme may be important target for cancer diagnostics, treatment

TET1 enzyme may be important target for cancer diagnostics, treatment

Mutations in the KRAS gene have long been known to cause cancer, and about one third of solid tumors have KRAS mutations or mutations in the KRAS pathway. KRAS promotes cancer formation not only by driving cell growth and division, but also by turning off protective tumor suppressor genes, which normally limit uncontrolled cell growth and cause damaged cells to self-destruct. [More]
Tufts University study explores relationship between transcription, expansions of DNA repeats

Tufts University study explores relationship between transcription, expansions of DNA repeats

Researchers in human genetics have known that long nucleotide repeats in DNA lead to instability of the genome and ultimately to human hereditary diseases such Freidreich's ataxia and Huntington's disease. [More]
Researchers examine genomic landscapes of humans and mice

Researchers examine genomic landscapes of humans and mice

Looking across evolutionary time and the genomic landscapes of humans and mice, an international group of researchers has found powerful clues to why certain processes and systems in the mouse - such as the immune system, metabolism and stress response - are so different from those in people. Building on years of mouse and gene regulation studies, they have developed a resource that can help scientists better understand how similarities and differences between mice and humans are written in their genomes. [More]
Promising molecular diagnostic approach to endometriosis

Promising molecular diagnostic approach to endometriosis

Researchers at UC San Francisco have identified patterns of genetic activity that can be used to diagnose endometriosis and its severity, a finding that may offer millions of women an alternative to surgery through a simple noninvasive procedure. [More]
Research reveals critical role natural antioxidant selenium plays in woman's fertility

Research reveals critical role natural antioxidant selenium plays in woman's fertility

University of Adelaide research has for the first time shown how much of a critical role the natural antioxidant selenium plays at the earliest stages of a woman's fertility. [More]
New study shows that brain’s ability to manage stress depends on brain protein

New study shows that brain’s ability to manage stress depends on brain protein

The brain's ability to effectively deal with stress or to lack that ability and be more susceptible to depression, depends on a single protein type in each person's brain, according to a study conducted at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published November 12 in the journal Nature. [More]
Effecting changes to FosB gene could help control addiction, depression

Effecting changes to FosB gene could help control addiction, depression

Regulation of a single, specific gene in a brain region related to drug addiction and depression is sufficient to reduce drug and stress responses, according to a study conducted at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published October 27 online in the journal Nature Neuroscience. [More]
RPCI researchers identify two novel candidate prognostic markers for ovarian cancer

RPCI researchers identify two novel candidate prognostic markers for ovarian cancer

Cancer researchers at Roswell Park Cancer Institute have identified two independent classes of novel candidate prognostic markers for ovarian cancer, advancing efforts to develop targeted therapies for the disease. The findings resulted from two separate studies published in the peer-reviewed journal PLoS ONE and based on data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), the world's largest public database on gene expression in different tumor types. [More]
Funding makes next-generation scientific equipment available to CBC research community

Funding makes next-generation scientific equipment available to CBC research community

The Chicago Biomedical Consortium is announcing a $3 million Infrastructure Initiative to promote investment in high-impact, next-generation scientific equipment at its member universities. The Initiative aims to make modern and powerful tools available to the CBC research community at a time when federal grants for scientific infrastructure are scarce. [More]
High-absorption BCM-95 Curcumin can reduce spread of cancer cells

High-absorption BCM-95 Curcumin can reduce spread of cancer cells

A recently published cellular study on colorectal cancer showed that high-absorption BCM-95 Curcumin is able to reduce the spread of cancer cells and potentially increase the effectiveness of chemotherapy in the treatment of advanced colon cancer. [More]
New study finds that it is possible to distinguish between different hemorrhagic fevers

New study finds that it is possible to distinguish between different hemorrhagic fevers

A new study has found it is possible to distinguish between different hemorrhagic fevers, including Marburg (Ebola cousin) and Lassa before the person becomes symptomatic. [More]
Endothelin gene expression linked to vision loss in premature babies

Endothelin gene expression linked to vision loss in premature babies

A gene known to play a major role in constricting blood vessels also appears to be a major player in the aberrant blood vessel growth that can destroy the vision of premature babies. [More]
Researchers find way to defeat elusive target proteins in cancer cells

Researchers find way to defeat elusive target proteins in cancer cells

Researchers at Dana-Farber/Boston Children's Cancer and Blood Disorders Center have found a way to defeat one of the most tantalizing yet elusive target proteins in cancer cells - employing a strategy that turns the protein's own molecular machinations against it. [More]
Scientists may have discovered new way to repair damaged tissue

Scientists may have discovered new way to repair damaged tissue

By transforming human scar cells into blood vessel cells, scientists at Houston Methodist may have discovered a new way to repair damaged tissue. The method, described in an upcoming issue of Circulation (early online), appeared to improve blood flow, oxygenation, and nutrition to areas in need. [More]
Regenerative medicine may offer new standard of advanced treatment for foot and leg ulcers

Regenerative medicine may offer new standard of advanced treatment for foot and leg ulcers

These are exciting times for regenerative medicine. Unlike conventional medicines, the regenerative approach can potentially work to restore the lost functionality of tissues or organs—the major reason for intensive focus on research and development in the field. [More]
Salk Institute researchers heal injured hearts of living mice

Salk Institute researchers heal injured hearts of living mice

Researchers at the Salk Institute have healed injured hearts of living mice by reactivating long dormant molecular machinery found in the animals' cells, a finding that could help pave the way to new therapies for heart disorders in humans. [More]
Effects of unhealthy lifestyle persist even after atherosclerosis treatment

Effects of unhealthy lifestyle persist even after atherosclerosis treatment

Almost everyone knows that improving your eating habits will most likely improve your health. What most people may not know, however, is that the effects of poor eating habits persist long after dietary habits are improved. In a new report appearing in the November 2014 issue of the Journal of Leukocyte Biology, scientists use mice to show that even after successful treatment of atherosclerosis (including lowering of blood cholesterol and a change in dietary habits) the effects of an unhealthy lifestyle still affect the way the immune system functions. [More]
Study measures effects of high-fat maternal diet on the cognitive functioning of offspring

Study measures effects of high-fat maternal diet on the cognitive functioning of offspring

New research suggests that a high-fat maternal diet during pregnancy and while breastfeeding could have significant and lasting detrimental effects on the brain function and behavior of children. [More]
ProstaCaid dietary supplement supports prostate health

ProstaCaid dietary supplement supports prostate health

A recent presentation at an international cancer research conference in Greece reviewed the body of data on ProstaCaid, a dietary supplement compound for prostate health. A number of published studies demonstrate the formula's effects in supporting prostate health against specific prostate cancer cell lines and prostate urinary symptoms. [More]
Type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease share common risk factors

Type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease share common risk factors

Type 2 diabetes (T2D) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) appear to have a lot in common. They share risk factors such as obesity and they often occur together. If they also share the same genetic underpinings, then doctors could devise a way to treat them together too. [More]