Gene Expression News and Research RSS Feed - Gene Expression News and Research

Gene Expression is the process by which a gene gets turned on in a cell to make RNA and proteins. Gene expression may be measured by looking at the RNA, or the protein made from the RNA, or what the protein does in a cell.
Innovative approach to treating AAT deficiency

Innovative approach to treating AAT deficiency

Researchers have demonstrated the feasibility of delivering an RNA that encodes for the protein alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT)--which is missing or nonfunctional in the genetic disorder AAT deficiency--into cells in the laboratory, enabling the cells to produce highly functional AAT. [More]
Study suggests potential way to predict autism or psychosis risk in children with genetic abnormality

Study suggests potential way to predict autism or psychosis risk in children with genetic abnormality

Doctors and researchers have long known that children who are missing about 60 genes on a certain chromosome are at a significantly elevated risk for developing either a disorder on the autism spectrum or psychosis — that is, any mental disorder characterized by delusions and hallucinations, including schizophrenia. But there has been no way to predict which child with the abnormality might be at risk for which disorder. [More]
Vital molecular mechanism in plants has similarities to certain signaling mechanisms in humans

Vital molecular mechanism in plants has similarities to certain signaling mechanisms in humans

Scientists at Van Andel Research Institute have revealed an important molecular mechanism in plants that has significant similarities to certain signaling mechanisms in humans, which are closely linked to early embryonic development and to diseases such as cancer. [More]
New computer algorithm helps scientists see drug's activity inside the body

New computer algorithm helps scientists see drug's activity inside the body

Researchers at Columbia University Medical Center have developed a computer algorithm that is helping scientists see how drugs produce pharmacological effects inside the body. The study, published in the journal Cell, could help researchers create drugs that are more efficient and less prone to side effects, suggest ways to regulate a drug's activity, and identify novel therapeutic uses for new and existing compounds. [More]
Moffitt researchers develop genetic test that analyzes sensitivity of tumors to radiation therapy

Moffitt researchers develop genetic test that analyzes sensitivity of tumors to radiation therapy

Recent advances in the understanding of cancer have led to more personalized therapies, such as drugs that target particular proteins and tests that analyze gene expression patterns in tumors to predict a patient's response to therapy. [More]
UC San Diego researchers identify pivotal player in diabetic kidney disease

UC San Diego researchers identify pivotal player in diabetic kidney disease

Tapping the potential of metabolomics, an emerging field focused on the chemical processes of metabolism, researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have identified a new and pivotal player in diabetic kidney disease. [More]
Adaptimmune’s NY-ESO-1 TCR-engineered T-cell therapy mediates sustained antitumor effects in multiple myeloma patients

Adaptimmune’s NY-ESO-1 TCR-engineered T-cell therapy mediates sustained antitumor effects in multiple myeloma patients

Adaptimmune Therapeutics plc, a clinical stage biopharmaceutical company focused on the use of T-cell therapy to treat cancer, today announced that data from its Phase I/II study of its affinity enhanced T-cell receptor therapeutic targeting the NY-ESO-1 cancer antigen in patients with multiple myeloma has been published in Nature Medicine. [More]
RepliCel obtains two important approvals to conduct RCS-01 phase 1 human clinical trial

RepliCel obtains two important approvals to conduct RCS-01 phase 1 human clinical trial

RepliCel Life Sciences Inc., a clinical stage regenerative medicine company focused on the development of autologous cell therapies, today announced it has received two important approvals required to conduct its RCS-01 phase 1 human clinical trial. [More]
Patients' own genetically engineered immune cells show significant success against multiple myeloma

Patients' own genetically engineered immune cells show significant success against multiple myeloma

In recent years, immunotherapy has emerged as a promising treatment for certain cancers. Now this strategy, which uses patients' own immune cells, genetically engineered to target tumors, has shown significant success against multiple myeloma, a cancer of the plasma cells that is largely incurable. [More]
Study findings provide basis for potential development of new methods to control HIV infection

Study findings provide basis for potential development of new methods to control HIV infection

Lower levels of cholesterol in certain immune cells--a result of enhanced cholesterol metabolism within those cells--may help explain why some HIV-infected people are able to naturally control disease progression, according to research that will be presented in a poster at the 8th International AIDS Society Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention (IAS 2015) in Vancouver, Canada, and the pre-conference 2015 Towards an HIV Cure Symposium. [More]
Virginia Tech scientist uses mathematical model to show how bacteria can control behavior of robots

Virginia Tech scientist uses mathematical model to show how bacteria can control behavior of robots

Forget the Vulcan mind-meld of the Star Trek generation -- as far as mind control techniques go, bacteria is the next frontier. In a paper published July 16 in Scientific Reports, which is part of the Nature Publishing Group, a Virginia Tech scientist used a mathematical model to demonstrate that bacteria can control the behavior of an inanimate device like a robot. [More]
TSRI scientists awarded two grants to develop new therapeutic target to reduce latent HIV infection

TSRI scientists awarded two grants to develop new therapeutic target to reduce latent HIV infection

Scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute have been awarded a pair of grants totaling nearly $2.8 million from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases of The National Institutes of Health to develop a new therapeutic agent to reduce latent levels of HIV that hide from the immune system in infected individuals. [More]
Study shows that 14-3-3 sigma opposes, reverses tumor-promoting metabolic programs

Study shows that 14-3-3 sigma opposes, reverses tumor-promoting metabolic programs

Every parent knows the maxim "feed a cold, starve a fever." In cancer, however, exactly how to feed or starve a tumor has not been easy to determine. [More]
Salk researchers move one step closer to making cures for genetic diseases a reality

Salk researchers move one step closer to making cures for genetic diseases a reality

Healthy brain, muscle, eye and heart cells would improve the lives of tens of thousands of people around the world with debilitating mitochondrial diseases. Now, researchers at the Salk Institute have gotten one step closer to making such cures a reality: they've turned cells from patients into healthy, mutation-free stem cells that can then become any cell type. [More]
Salk professor receives Allen Distinguished Investigator award to uncover biology of Alzheimer's disease

Salk professor receives Allen Distinguished Investigator award to uncover biology of Alzheimer's disease

The Salk Institute today announced that Rusty Gage, Salk professor in the Laboratory of Genetics, has been selected as one of five recipients of the Paul G. Allen Family Foundation's Allen Distinguished Investigator (ADI) program and will be awarded $1.5 million to conduct his research. These researchers have projects aimed at uncovering the elusive biological foundations of Alzheimer's disease. [More]
Paul G. Allen Family Foundation announces ADI grants for Alzheimer's disease research

Paul G. Allen Family Foundation announces ADI grants for Alzheimer's disease research

The Paul G. Allen Family Foundation announced today the award of Allen Distinguished Investigator (ADI) grants to five teams of researchers with projects that will open new and innovative avenues of research in Alzheimer's disease by uncovering its elusive biological roots. [More]
Novel gene therapy control system regulates expression of therapeutic transgenes

Novel gene therapy control system regulates expression of therapeutic transgenes

Korean researchers have described a novel control system to regulate the expression of a therapeutic transgene by targeting the passenger strand of a microRNA (miR-122) linked to the transgene. [More]
New understanding of keratin 17 protein could lead to development of better ways to prevent cancer

New understanding of keratin 17 protein could lead to development of better ways to prevent cancer

New research from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health suggests that the protein keratin 17 - the presence of which is used in the lab to detect and stage various types of cancers - is not just a biomarker for the disease, but may play a critical role in tumor growth. [More]
Study discovers potential link between inherited genome-wide DNA sequences and CAD

Study discovers potential link between inherited genome-wide DNA sequences and CAD

A study to examine recessively inherited genome-wide DNA sequences has for the first time discovered a potential link with Britain's biggest killer - Coronary Artery Disease (CAD). [More]
Four young scientists named recipients of Damon Runyon-Sohn Pediatric Cancer Research Fellowship Award

Four young scientists named recipients of Damon Runyon-Sohn Pediatric Cancer Research Fellowship Award

The Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation has named four outstanding young scientists as recipients of the prestigious Damon Runyon-Sohn Pediatric Cancer Research Fellowship Award, committing nearly $875,000 to help address a critical shortage of funding for pediatric cancer research. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement