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Gene Expression is the process by which a gene gets turned on in a cell to make RNA and proteins. Gene expression may be measured by looking at the RNA, or the protein made from the RNA, or what the protein does in a cell.
Japanese scientists find evidence that cytokine IL-17A plays crucial role in psoriasis

Japanese scientists find evidence that cytokine IL-17A plays crucial role in psoriasis

Psoriasis is an inflammatory skin condition that affects some 125 million people worldwide. It is characterized by itchy, scaly skin plaques. The exact cause of psoriasis is unclear. [More]
WPI receives patent for novel method of reprogramming human skin cells

WPI receives patent for novel method of reprogramming human skin cells

Cell therapies for a range of serious conditions, including heart attacks, diabetes, and traumatic injuries, will be accelerated by research at Worcester Polytechnic Institute that yielded a newly patented method of converting human skin cells into engines of wound healing and tissue regeneration. [More]
ANK3 and other genes may play key role in affecting mood, stress and longevity

ANK3 and other genes may play key role in affecting mood, stress and longevity

The visible impacts of depression and stress that can be seen in a person's face -- and contribute to shorter lives -- can also be found in alterations in genetic activity, according to newly published research. [More]
Researchers identify mutations that may stimulate early cancer growth in precancerous colorectal tissue

Researchers identify mutations that may stimulate early cancer growth in precancerous colorectal tissue

Researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have discovered mutations that may fuel early cancer growth in precancerous colorectal tissue from high-risk patients. [More]
Epigenetic modification of Igfbp2 gene may increase risk of obesity and fatty liver

Epigenetic modification of Igfbp2 gene may increase risk of obesity and fatty liver

Scientists of the German Center for Diabetes Research led by the German Institute of Human Nutrition have shown in a mouse model that the epigenetic modification of the Igfbp2 gene observed in the young animal precedes a fatty liver in the adult animal later in life. [More]
Scientists take key step towards understanding link between obesity and physically distant diseases

Scientists take key step towards understanding link between obesity and physically distant diseases

Obesity is on the rise throughout the world, and in some developed countries two-third of the adult population is either overweight or obese. This brings with it an increased risk of serious conditions such as heart disease, stroke, cancer and osteoarthritis. [More]
Diet experiments on Lynch syndrome mouse model may help in early detection of colon cancer

Diet experiments on Lynch syndrome mouse model may help in early detection of colon cancer

Colorectal cancer is the second most common cause of cancer-related deaths in the Western world, mainly because it is usually diagnosed too late. Finding ways to identify those people who are at increased risk of developing colon cancer is therefore crucial, a researcher will tell the annual conference of the European Society of Human Genetics today. [More]
New study aims to identify biomarkers linked to cartilage degradation in OA patients

New study aims to identify biomarkers linked to cartilage degradation in OA patients

Joint injury can lead to post-traumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA). In fact, about half of all people who rupture the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) in their knee will develop PTOA within 10-20 years of the injury. [More]
Study examines effects of ultra-low doses of glyphosate on gene expression profiles

Study examines effects of ultra-low doses of glyphosate on gene expression profiles

Glyphosate, often sold under the brand name of Roundup, is the world's most widely used weed-killer. While Glyphosate has approval from regulatory bodies worldwide, there are growing concerns about its possible adverse health effects. [More]
Loss of HOXA5 protein may allow breast cancer cells to thrive

Loss of HOXA5 protein may allow breast cancer cells to thrive

Many breast cancers are marked by a lack of HOXA5 protein, a gene product known to control cell differentiation and death, and lower levels of the protein correspond to poorer outcomes for patients. [More]
Gene editing technology helps excise segment of HIV-1 DNA from genomes of living animals

Gene editing technology helps excise segment of HIV-1 DNA from genomes of living animals

Using gene editing technology, researchers at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University have, for the first time, successfully excised a segment of HIV-1 DNA - the virus responsible for AIDS - from the genomes of living animals. [More]
Exposure to BBP can make babies obese even before they are born

Exposure to BBP can make babies obese even before they are born

Benzyl butyl phthalate (BBP), a chemical commonly used in the food manufacturing process, can increase fat stores in the body even before we're born, according to a new study published in the Journal of Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology. [More]
Oct4 gene may play significant role in preventing underlying cause of heart attacks, strokes

Oct4 gene may play significant role in preventing underlying cause of heart attacks, strokes

A gene that scientific dogma insists is inactive in adults actually plays a vital role in preventing the underlying cause of most heart attacks and strokes, researchers at the University of Virginia School of Medicine have determined. [More]
Unlocking the dark proteome: an interview with Dr Kriwacki

Unlocking the dark proteome: an interview with Dr Kriwacki

The term dark proteome refers to proteins whose structural features and thus functions are not well understood. Many proteins within the dark proteome do not fold into stable three-dimensional structures. These proteins are called intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) and feature highly flexible, disordered confirmations. [More]
Researchers develop novel ss-siRNAs to turn off disease-related genes

Researchers develop novel ss-siRNAs to turn off disease-related genes

Combining the therapeutic potential and advantages of existing oligonucleotide-based approaches to turn off disease-related genes, a type of single-stranded silencing RNAs (ss-siRNAs) has shown significantly improved potency and activity. [More]
Histone mutation linked to fatal pediatric brain tumor

Histone mutation linked to fatal pediatric brain tumor

A single defect in a gene that codes for a histone — a "spool" that wraps idle DNA — is linked to pediatric cancers in a study published today in the journal Science. [More]
Cryo-EM technique allows researchers to visualize large transcription PICs at near-atomic resolution

Cryo-EM technique allows researchers to visualize large transcription PICs at near-atomic resolution

An unprecedented molecular view of the critical early events in gene expression, a process essential for all life, has been provided by researchers at Georgia State University, the University of California at Berkeley and Northwestern University. [More]
Scientists discover reliable marker to spot CAFs in oral cancer tissues

Scientists discover reliable marker to spot CAFs in oral cancer tissues

For the first time, researchers have identified a reliable marker (PDGFRβ) to detect carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (cells within the tumor that encourage growth and metastasis) (CAFs) in oral cancer tissues. With this discovery, anti-PDGFRβ treatment could soon be combined with existing tumor treatments to provide a more effective cancer therapy. [More]
Study suggests ways of minimizing DNA folding errors

Study suggests ways of minimizing DNA folding errors

Induced pluripotent stem cells hold promise for regenerative medicine because they can, in theory, turn into any type of tissue and because they are made from a patient's own adult cells, guaranteeing compatibility. However, the technique that turns adult cells into these iPS cells is not foolproof; after reverting to their pluripotent state, these cells don't always correctly differentiate back into adult cells. [More]
Mice study reveals signs of stress-related early maturation in vital brain region

Mice study reveals signs of stress-related early maturation in vital brain region

Intuition is all one needs to understand that stress in early childhood can create lifelong psychological troubles, but scientists have only begun to explain how those emerge in the brain. [More]
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