Gene Expression News and Research RSS Feed - Gene Expression News and Research

Gene Expression is the process by which a gene gets turned on in a cell to make RNA and proteins. Gene expression may be measured by looking at the RNA, or the protein made from the RNA, or what the protein does in a cell.
New finding could accelerate research to regenerate damaged tissue

New finding could accelerate research to regenerate damaged tissue

Scientists at NYU Langone Medical Center have found a way to boost dramatically the efficiency of the process for turning adult cells into so-called pluripotent stem cells by combining three well-known compounds, including vitamin C. [More]
Six research institutions awarded NIH grants to create database of human cellular responses

Six research institutions awarded NIH grants to create database of human cellular responses

Building on a successful three-year pilot project, the National Institutes of Health has awarded more than $64 million to six research institutions to create a database of human cellular responses, the Library of Integrated Network-based Cellular Signatures. [More]
Researchers identify non-protein-coding RNA whose expression linked to ovarian cancer

Researchers identify non-protein-coding RNA whose expression linked to ovarian cancer

Over the years researchers have made tremendous strides in the understanding and treatment of cancer by searching genomes for links between genetic alterations and disease. [More]
Sex hormone that helps protect females from stroke may also reduce risk of autism, say scientists

Sex hormone that helps protect females from stroke may also reduce risk of autism, say scientists

The same sex hormone that helps protect females from stroke may also reduce their risk of autism, scientists say. [More]
Study evaluates impact of myPath Melanoma diagnostic test

Study evaluates impact of myPath Melanoma diagnostic test

Myriad Genetics, Inc. today presented results from a pivotal clinical utility study of the Myriad myPath- Melanoma test at the 2014 College of American Pathologists (CAP) annual meeting in Chicago, Ill. [More]
Researchers find most accurate gene transcript expression estimation method

Researchers find most accurate gene transcript expression estimation method

RNA-sequencing data analysis method BitSeq developed by Academy Research Fellow Antti Honkela's research group and University of Manchester researchers has been found to be the most accurate gene transcript expression estimation method in a large international assessment. [More]
New regulatory component in infectious bacterium helps explain ability to survive in human body

New regulatory component in infectious bacterium helps explain ability to survive in human body

The discovery of a new regulatory component in an infectious bacterium could aid efforts to explain its ability to survive in the human body, report microbiologists at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) and University of Maryland, College Park, in the journal Science. [More]
Scientists make important breakthrough in fight against debilitating autoimmune diseases

Scientists make important breakthrough in fight against debilitating autoimmune diseases

Scientists have made an important breakthrough in the fight against debilitating autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis by revealing how to stop cells attacking healthy body tissue. [More]
Flow through pain-sensing molecule helps worms adapt to pain

Flow through pain-sensing molecule helps worms adapt to pain

When you accidentally touch a hot oven, you rapidly pull your hand away. Although scientists know the basic neural circuits involved in sensing and responding to such painful stimuli, they are still sorting out the molecular players. [More]
Dartmouth researchers evaluate role of assortativity signature on robustness

Dartmouth researchers evaluate role of assortativity signature on robustness

Dartmouth researchers explored the type and number of connections in transcription factor networks (TFNs) to evaluate the role assortativity plays on robustness in a study published in PLOS Computational Biology in August. [More]
Researchers explore connections in TFNs to evaluate role assortativity plays on robustness

Researchers explore connections in TFNs to evaluate role assortativity plays on robustness

Dartmouth researchers explored the type and number of connections in transcription factor networks (TFNs) to evaluate the role assortativity plays on robustness in a study published in PLOS Computational Biology in August. [More]
CTC clusters cause metastasis

CTC clusters cause metastasis

Circulating tumor cell (CTC) clusters - clumps of from 2 to 50 tumor cells that break off a primary tumor and are carried through the bloodstream - appear to be much more likely to cause metastasis than are single CTCs, according to a study from investigators at the Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center. [More]
Scientists solve mystery of why specific signaling pathway can be linked with alcohol dependence

Scientists solve mystery of why specific signaling pathway can be linked with alcohol dependence

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have solved the mystery of why a specific signaling pathway can be associated with alcohol dependence. [More]
Researchers help to gain greater insight into biological clock that sets pace for daily life

Researchers help to gain greater insight into biological clock that sets pace for daily life

Casey Diekman, assistant professor of mathematical sciences at New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT), is helping to gain greater insight into the biological clock that sets the pace for daily life. [More]
Female rats whose great grandparents exposed to toxins become more vulnerable to stress

Female rats whose great grandparents exposed to toxins become more vulnerable to stress

Scientists have known that toxic effects of substances known as endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs), found in both natural and human-made materials, can pass from one generation to the next, but new research shows that females with ancestral exposure to EDC may show especially adverse reactions to stress. [More]
Researchers develop new integrated approach to pinpoint genetic "drivers" of cancer

Researchers develop new integrated approach to pinpoint genetic "drivers" of cancer

UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers have developed a new integrated approach to pinpoint the genetic "drivers" of cancer, uncovering eight genes that could be viable for targeted breast cancer therapy. [More]
Study finds a host of new clues on gene-environment interactions in Crohn's disease

Study finds a host of new clues on gene-environment interactions in Crohn's disease

A new study finds a wide range of epigenetic changes-alterations in DNA across the genome that may be related to key environmental exposures-in children with Crohn's disease (CD), reports Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, official journal of the Crohn's & Colitis Foundation of America. [More]
Study identifies protein that appears to play key role in protecting people infected with tuberculosis

Study identifies protein that appears to play key role in protecting people infected with tuberculosis

UCLA-led study has identified a protein that appears to play a key role in protecting people infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis — the bacterium that causes tuberculosis — from developing the active form of the disease. [More]
Scientists identify biomarker strongly associated with aggressive breast cancer

Scientists identify biomarker strongly associated with aggressive breast cancer

Two Northwestern University scientists have identified a biomarker strongly associated with basal-like breast cancer, a highly aggressive carcinoma that is resistant to many types of chemotherapy. The biomarker, a protein called STAT3, provides a smart target for new therapeutics designed to treat this often deadly cancer. [More]
Research validates Myc inhibition as effective therapeutic strategy for glioma

Research validates Myc inhibition as effective therapeutic strategy for glioma

Research led by the Vall d'Hebron Institute of Oncology (VHIO) evidence the most conclusive preclinical results to-date validating Myc inhibition as a therapeutic strategy in glioma - a highly agressive tumor type that notoriously outsmarts current anti-cancer therapies. [More]