Gene Expression News and Research RSS Feed - Gene Expression News and Research

Gene Expression is the process by which a gene gets turned on in a cell to make RNA and proteins. Gene expression may be measured by looking at the RNA, or the protein made from the RNA, or what the protein does in a cell.
NASA's research program uses omics to look more closely at individual health

NASA's research program uses omics to look more closely at individual health

NASA's Human Research Program is releasing the first half of a video series entitled Omics: Exploring Space Through You to highlight its Twins Study, in conjunction with its National DNA Day Reddit Ask Me Anything event at 10 a.m. CDT/11 a.m. EDT, Monday, April 25, 2016. The series explores space through you by using omics to look more closely at individual health. [More]
Under-expressed miR-9 gene may contribute to schizophrenia risk

Under-expressed miR-9 gene may contribute to schizophrenia risk

By turning skin cells into brain neurons, researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai have identified that certain tiny molecules aiding in gene expression, known as microRNAs (miRNAs), are under-expressed in the brains of the 14 schizophrenia patients they studied. Their findings, published online today in the journal Cell Reports, show that one of these molecules, a miRNA known as miR-9, is a risk factor that controls the activity of hundreds of genes. [More]
Novel function of PLK1 gene in prostate cancer metastasis

Novel function of PLK1 gene in prostate cancer metastasis

Researchers at VCU Massey Cancer Center have uncovered a novel function of the gene PLK1 (polo-like kinase 1) that helps prostate cancer cells metastasize (spread) to other parts of the body. This mechanism highlights new potential targets for cancer therapies and challenges the previous understanding of PLK1's role in cancer growth and progression. [More]
Unique mouse model could help study genetic origins and potential treatments for ALS

Unique mouse model could help study genetic origins and potential treatments for ALS

University of Florida Health researchers have developed a unique mouse model that will allow researchers around the world to better study the genetic origins and potential treatments for a neurodegenerative brain disease that causes amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, often referred to as ALS or Lou Gehrig's disease, and frontotemporal dementia. [More]
Infected mice can be better models for human diseases

Infected mice can be better models for human diseases

Vaccines and therapeutics developed using mice often don't work as expected in humans. New research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis points to the near-sterile surroundings of laboratory mice as a key reason. [More]
New study explores mechanisms that control size, shape of tubular organ systems

New study explores mechanisms that control size, shape of tubular organ systems

A new study from the group of Holger Gerhardt in collaboration with Katie Bentley's Lab addresses a long standing question in the wider field of developmental biology and tissue patterning in general, and in the vascular biology field in particular: 'What are the fundamental mechanisms controlling size and shape of tubular organ systems'. [More]
Novel method could help analyze GWAS results for sporadic diseases

Novel method could help analyze GWAS results for sporadic diseases

Using a novel method, Whitehead Institute researchers have determined how a non-coding mutation identified in genome-wide association studies can contribute to sporadic Parkinson's disease (PD). The approach could be used to analyze GWAS results for other sporadic diseases with genetic causes, such as multiple sclerosis, diabetes, and cancer. [More]
Newly discovered player in epigenetic regulation closely linked to known cancer promoters

Newly discovered player in epigenetic regulation closely linked to known cancer promoters

If genes form the body's blueprint, then the layer of epigenetics decides which parts of the plan get built. Unfortunately, many cancers hijack epigenetics to modulate the expression of genes, thus promoting cancer growth and survival. [More]
Researchers identify biological pathway that explains why current asthma therapies fail in many cases

Researchers identify biological pathway that explains why current asthma therapies fail in many cases

Asthma is an enormous public health problem that continues to grow larger, in part because scientists don't fully understand how it is caused. Existing therapies don't cure the disease and often don't even significantly alleviate the symptoms. Now, scientists from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and Rutgers University have identified a biological pathway that potentially explains why current asthma therapies don't work well in many cases—and might be targeted to help those patients. [More]
MicroRNAs circulating in blood could lead to first diagnostic test for asthma

MicroRNAs circulating in blood could lead to first diagnostic test for asthma

People with asthma have telltale molecules circulating in their blood, say researchers at Penn State College of Medicine. The discovery could lead to the first diagnostic blood test for asthma, as well as more targeted treatments for the condition. [More]
High dosages of antihistamines have dulling effect on genes associated with post-exercise recovery

High dosages of antihistamines have dulling effect on genes associated with post-exercise recovery

After vigorous exercise, some 3,000 genes go to work to aid recovery by boosting muscles and blood vessels, but in the presence of high doses of antihistamines almost 27 percent of the gene response is blunted, according to University of Oregon researchers. [More]
Researchers investigate biochemical, physiological characteristics of facial and extraocular muscles

Researchers investigate biochemical, physiological characteristics of facial and extraocular muscles

In a new study, a research team at Basel University Hospital in Switzerland investigates the biochemical and physiological characteristics of orbicularis oculi, a group of facial muscles that control the eyelids and are selectively spared or involved in different neuromuscular disorders. What they found also helps to explain why another set of muscles—the extraocular muscles that control the movement of the eye—are not affected by Duchenne muscular dystrophy, congenital muscular dystrophy, and aging. [More]
Advances in NMR metabolomics: an interview with Professor Tone F. Bathen

Advances in NMR metabolomics: an interview with Professor Tone F. Bathen

The main objective of our research is to improve and individualize cancer diagnostics and cancer treatment. We try to achieve this through the integrated use of MR technology and the development of data-driven tools to analyze tumors on both a functional and molecular level. [More]
Clinical study shows association between Corus CAD blood test scores and cardiovascular event rates

Clinical study shows association between Corus CAD blood test scores and cardiovascular event rates

CardioDx, Inc., a molecular diagnostics company specializing in cardiovascular genomics, announced today results from a genomic substudy of the NHLBI-funded Prospective Multicenter Imaging Study for Evaluation of Chest Pain (PROMISE) trial in nondiabetic patients receiving the Corus CAD blood test. [More]
Maternal smoking influences epigenetic programming of unborn child's genetic make-up

Maternal smoking influences epigenetic programming of unborn child's genetic make-up

If mothers smoke during pregnancy, they influence the epigenetic programming of their unborn child's genetic make-up in the long term. This may give rise to an increased risk of the development of disease risks later in the child's life. [More]
Daily walnut consumption positively impacts blood cholesterol levels in older adults

Daily walnut consumption positively impacts blood cholesterol levels in older adults

Initial findings from the Walnuts and Healthy Aging study presented at Experimental Biology 2016 (EB) indicate that daily walnut consumption positively impacts blood cholesterol levels without adverse effects on body weight among older adults. [More]
MicroRNA controls tumor cell proliferation in most aggressive large B-cell lymphoma

MicroRNA controls tumor cell proliferation in most aggressive large B-cell lymphoma

A recent study by researchers at Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine showed that a microRNA called miR-181a dampens signals from the cancer-driving NFκB protein pathway in the most aggressive large B-cell lymphomas (DLBCL). By reducing NFκB signaling, miR-181a controls tumor cell proliferation and survival and could be the target of novel therapies. The study was published in the journal Blood. [More]
Experimental urine test identifies 92% of men with elevated PSA levels

Experimental urine test identifies 92% of men with elevated PSA levels

An experimental urine test that detects genetic changes associated with prostate cancer identified 92 percent of men with elevated PSA (prostate-specific antigen) levels who had high-grade cancers, according to a study published today in JAMA Oncology online. [More]
Commonly used fungicides could cause gene expression changes in brain cells

Commonly used fungicides could cause gene expression changes in brain cells

Scientists at the UNC School of Medicine have found a class of commonly used fungicides that produce gene expression changes similar to those in people with autism and neurodegenerative conditions, including Alzheimer's disease and Huntington's disease. [More]
Penn researchers discover molecular mechanism that underlies common cerebrovascular disease

Penn researchers discover molecular mechanism that underlies common cerebrovascular disease

Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are clusters of dilated, thin-walled blood vessels in the brain that can cause stroke and seizures, yet exactly how they form is somewhat of a mystery. Now, a team from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania has discovered the molecular mechanism that underlies this common cerebrovascular disease. They published their results this week online ahead of print in Nature. [More]
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