Gene Expression News and Research RSS Feed - Gene Expression News and Research

Gene Expression is the process by which a gene gets turned on in a cell to make RNA and proteins. Gene expression may be measured by looking at the RNA, or the protein made from the RNA, or what the protein does in a cell.
Unlocking the dark proteome: an interview with Dr Kriwacki

Unlocking the dark proteome: an interview with Dr Kriwacki

The term dark proteome refers to proteins whose structural features and thus functions are not well understood. Many proteins within the dark proteome do not fold into stable three-dimensional structures. These proteins are called intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) and feature highly flexible, disordered confirmations. [More]
Researchers develop novel ss-siRNAs to turn off disease-related genes

Researchers develop novel ss-siRNAs to turn off disease-related genes

Combining the therapeutic potential and advantages of existing oligonucleotide-based approaches to turn off disease-related genes, a type of single-stranded silencing RNAs (ss-siRNAs) has shown significantly improved potency and activity. [More]
Histone mutation linked to fatal pediatric brain tumor

Histone mutation linked to fatal pediatric brain tumor

A single defect in a gene that codes for a histone — a "spool" that wraps idle DNA — is linked to pediatric cancers in a study published today in the journal Science. [More]
Cryo-EM technique allows researchers to visualize large transcription PICs at near-atomic resolution

Cryo-EM technique allows researchers to visualize large transcription PICs at near-atomic resolution

An unprecedented molecular view of the critical early events in gene expression, a process essential for all life, has been provided by researchers at Georgia State University, the University of California at Berkeley and Northwestern University. [More]
Scientists discover reliable marker to spot CAFs in oral cancer tissues

Scientists discover reliable marker to spot CAFs in oral cancer tissues

For the first time, researchers have identified a reliable marker (PDGFRβ) to detect carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (cells within the tumor that encourage growth and metastasis) (CAFs) in oral cancer tissues. With this discovery, anti-PDGFRβ treatment could soon be combined with existing tumor treatments to provide a more effective cancer therapy. [More]
Study suggests ways of minimizing DNA folding errors

Study suggests ways of minimizing DNA folding errors

Induced pluripotent stem cells hold promise for regenerative medicine because they can, in theory, turn into any type of tissue and because they are made from a patient's own adult cells, guaranteeing compatibility. However, the technique that turns adult cells into these iPS cells is not foolproof; after reverting to their pluripotent state, these cells don't always correctly differentiate back into adult cells. [More]
Mice study reveals signs of stress-related early maturation in vital brain region

Mice study reveals signs of stress-related early maturation in vital brain region

Intuition is all one needs to understand that stress in early childhood can create lifelong psychological troubles, but scientists have only begun to explain how those emerge in the brain. [More]
Titanium dioxide nanoparticles can have low-level effects on oxidative stress genes

Titanium dioxide nanoparticles can have low-level effects on oxidative stress genes

A nanoparticle commonly used in food, cosmetics, sunscreen and other products can have subtle effects on the activity of genes expressing enzymes that address oxidative stress inside two types of cells. [More]
Simultaneous DNA, RNA and protein analysis to enhance cancer immunology studies: an interview with Dr Joseph Beechem

Simultaneous DNA, RNA and protein analysis to enhance cancer immunology studies: an interview with Dr Joseph Beechem

Cancer immunology is all about how your immune cells are going to fight and kill your tumor cells. If you look at the pure genetic code of a T-cell that's going to kill your tumor compared to the same cell that has been “put-to-sleep” (by the tumor), the pure genetic DNA content of those two cells are identical. [More]
lncRNA in placenta may help protect unborn baby from invading pathogens

lncRNA in placenta may help protect unborn baby from invading pathogens

The human placenta is an organ unlike any other. During the course of nine months it is formed by the embryo, sustains life and then is shed. [More]
Loyola researchers detect tumor gene that may help predict survival outcomes in mouth cancer patients

Loyola researchers detect tumor gene that may help predict survival outcomes in mouth cancer patients

Loyola researchers have identified a tumor gene that may help to predict survival outcomes in patients with cancer of the mouth and tongue. [More]
Research provides new insight into cellular composition of IDH1-mutant gliomas

Research provides new insight into cellular composition of IDH1-mutant gliomas

Winner of the Preuss Research Award, Andrew Venteicher, MD, PhD, presented his research, Cellular Architecture of Human IDH1-mutant Gliomas Revealed Using Single-cell RNA Sequencing, during the 2016 American Association of Neurological Surgeons Annual Scientific Meeting. [More]
Total cessation of GnRH production by hypothalamic neurons can lead to infertility

Total cessation of GnRH production by hypothalamic neurons can lead to infertility

Individual small RNAs are responsible for controlling the expression of gonadoliberin or GnRH (Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone), a neurohormone that controls sexual maturation, the appearance of puberty, and fertility in adults. [More]
Understanding effects of freeze-thawing, intravenous delivery on MSC function

Understanding effects of freeze-thawing, intravenous delivery on MSC function

Before the therapeutic potential of using human tissue-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) to treat immune and degenerative diseases can be fully determined, the effects of freeze-thawing and intravenous delivery on MSC function must be understood. [More]
Combination of existing chemotherapy drugs can reduce breast cancer stem cells, improve survival

Combination of existing chemotherapy drugs can reduce breast cancer stem cells, improve survival

Two existing chemotherapy drugs appear to be a powerful pair in targeting errant stem cells that are making breast cancer and enabling its spread and recurrence, scientists report. [More]
Scientists discover genetic switches linked to increased lifespan in mammals

Scientists discover genetic switches linked to increased lifespan in mammals

Newly discovered genetic switches that increase lifespan and boost fitness in worms are also linked to increased lifespan in mammals, offering hope that drugs to flip these switches could improve human metabolic function and increase longevity. [More]
Researchers one step closer to understanding disease origin

Researchers one step closer to understanding disease origin

Researchers are one step closer to understanding the genetic and biological basis of diseases like cancer, diabetes, Alzheimer's and rheumatoid arthritis - and identifying new drug targets and therapies - thanks to work by three computational biology research teams from the University of Arizona Health Sciences, University of Pennsylvania and Vanderbilt University. [More]
Scientists reprogram mature blood cells from mice into blood-forming HSCs

Scientists reprogram mature blood cells from mice into blood-forming HSCs

Researchers at Boston Children's Hospital have reprogrammed mature blood cells from mice into blood-forming hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), using a cocktail of eight genetic switches called transcription factors. The reprogrammed cells, which the researchers have dubbed induced HSCs (iHSCs), have the functional hallmarks of HSCs, are able to self-renew like HSCs, and can give rise to all of the cellular components of the blood like HSCs. [More]
Researchers explore changes in Parkinson's-affected cells at different stages of the disease

Researchers explore changes in Parkinson's-affected cells at different stages of the disease

It's an unsettling thought: You could be walking around for 20 years developing Parkinson's disease and not even know it. [More]
Discovery of shared biological properties among DNA variants may help identify new therapeutic targets

Discovery of shared biological properties among DNA variants may help identify new therapeutic targets

The discovery of shared biological properties among independent variants of DNA sequences offers the opportunity to broaden understanding of the biological basis of disease and identify new therapeutic targets, according to a collaboration between the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, the University of Arizona Health Sciences, and Vanderbilt University. The group published their findings this month in npj Genomic Medicine. [More]
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