Gene Expression News and Research RSS Feed - Gene Expression News and Research

Gene Expression is the process by which a gene gets turned on in a cell to make RNA and proteins. Gene expression may be measured by looking at the RNA, or the protein made from the RNA, or what the protein does in a cell.
Review provides new insights into diagnosis, treatment for PCOS

Review provides new insights into diagnosis, treatment for PCOS

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) afflicts over 14 million women in the United States. The disorder increases the risk of endometrial cancer, heart disease, high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes, asthma, obesity, depression and anxiety, as well as infertility and a variety of reproductive disorders. [More]
Amish farm environment protects children from asthma by shaping immune system

Amish farm environment protects children from asthma by shaping immune system

By probing the differences between two farming communities—the Amish of Indiana and the Hutterites of South Dakota—an interdisciplinary team of researchers found that specific aspects of the Amish environment are associated with changes to immune cells that appear to protect children from developing asthma. [More]
Research could help develop better therapies for new subtype of adenocarcinoma  patients

Research could help develop better therapies for new subtype of adenocarcinoma patients

Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer deaths, accounting for about a third of all tumor-related deaths. Adenocarcinomas, a non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), account for about 40 percent of cancer diagnoses, but few treatments are available for the disease. [More]
Combinations of FDA-approved drugs may prevent vision loss linked to retinal degeneration

Combinations of FDA-approved drugs may prevent vision loss linked to retinal degeneration

Combinations of Food and Drug Administration-approved drugs protect against the loss of cells required for vision in a mouse model of blinding retinal diseases. [More]
Scientists engineer therapeutic system with two arms to get better hold on cancer target

Scientists engineer therapeutic system with two arms to get better hold on cancer target

Scientists have engineered a sort of biological barbell that can get inside cancer cells and do damage to two proteins that work independently and together to enable cancer's survival and spread. [More]
Scientists develop model using transformed stem cells to accelerate screening of drugs for rare cancers

Scientists develop model using transformed stem cells to accelerate screening of drugs for rare cancers

Researchers at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center say they have developed a system that uses transformed human stem cells to speed up screening of existing drugs that might work against rare brain and other cancers. [More]
TSRI study unveils new twist in immune biology

TSRI study unveils new twist in immune biology

A new study, led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute, reveals a surprising twist in immune biology. [More]
Researchers identify how precise control of inflammation could lead to bone repair

Researchers identify how precise control of inflammation could lead to bone repair

In their mission to design new biomaterials that promote tissue regeneration, Drexel University researchers have identified how inflammation, when precisely controlled, is crucial to bone repair. [More]
Study clarifies role of KLF12 in CRC tumor growth

Study clarifies role of KLF12 in CRC tumor growth

Results of preclinical studies by MUSC investigators reported in the July 2016 issue of PLOS One, demonstrate for the first time that the transcription factor KLF12 promotes CRC cell growth, in part, by activating EGR1. Furthermore, data demonstrate that KLF12 and EGR1 levels synergistically correlate with poor CRC prognoses. [More]
UAB researchers uncover vital mechanism for L-DOPA-induced-dyskinesia

UAB researchers uncover vital mechanism for L-DOPA-induced-dyskinesia

Though the drug levodopa can dramatically improve Parkinson's disease symptoms, within five years one-half of the patients using L-DOPA develop an irreversible condition -- involuntary repetitive, rapid and jerky movements. [More]
Study identifies two proteins crucial for self-renewal of skin stem cells

Study identifies two proteins crucial for self-renewal of skin stem cells

Our skin renews, heals wounds, and regenerates the hair that covers it thanks to a small group of stem cells. These cells continually produce new ones, which appear on the skin surface after a few days. [More]
Blood pressure hormone system important for cardiovascular health can promote obesity

Blood pressure hormone system important for cardiovascular health can promote obesity

New research by University of Iowa scientists helps explain how a hormone system often targeted to treat cardiovascular disease can also lower metabolism and promote obesity. [More]
Study reports sampling method used for new breast cancer tests may need to be refined

Study reports sampling method used for new breast cancer tests may need to be refined

Not only is breast cancer more than one disease, but a single breast cancer tumor can vary within itself, a finding that University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute researchers discovered has the potential to lead to very different patient treatment plans depending on the tumor sample and diagnostic testing used. [More]
Changes in the brain's pleasure center may decrease physical activity in postmenopausal women

Changes in the brain's pleasure center may decrease physical activity in postmenopausal women

As women enter menopause, their levels of physical activity decrease; for years scientists were unable to determine why. [More]
ZMYND8 protein can suppress metastasis-linked genes in prostate cancer

ZMYND8 protein can suppress metastasis-linked genes in prostate cancer

Although it reads like European license plate number, a protein known as ZMYND8 has demonstrated its ability to block metastasis-linked genes in prostate cancer, according to a study at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. [More]
Study finds risk markers for Parkinson's disease hiding in unusual spots

Study finds risk markers for Parkinson's disease hiding in unusual spots

Clues that point toward new risk mechanisms for developing Parkinson's disease are hiding in some unusual spots, according to a study published today in Scientific Reports [More]
Scientists discover modified human protein involved in Ebola virus replication

Scientists discover modified human protein involved in Ebola virus replication

A newly identified requirement of a modified human protein in ebolavirus (EBOV) replication, may unlock the door for new approaches to treating Ebola. [More]
Predictive power of computational toxicology demonstrated with crowd-sources scientific challenge

Predictive power of computational toxicology demonstrated with crowd-sources scientific challenge

Results of the Systems Toxicology Computational Challenge have demonstrated how transcriptomics information present in the blood can be used to predict whether people have been exposed or not exposed to specific toxicants. [More]
Researchers unveil engineered protein to suppress cancer-promoting message within cells

Researchers unveil engineered protein to suppress cancer-promoting message within cells

Over a century of research has shined light on the once-murky innards of our cells, from the genes that serve as our "blueprints" to the proteins and other molecules that are our cellular taskmasters. [More]
Key gene controls ability of adult stem cells to regenerate muscle after injury, study finds

Key gene controls ability of adult stem cells to regenerate muscle after injury, study finds

A key gene enables the repair of injured muscle throughout life. This is the finding of a study in mice led by researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center and the University of Colorado at Boulder, and published online July 21 in Cell Reports. [More]
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