Gene Expression News and Research RSS Feed - Gene Expression News and Research

Gene Expression is the process by which a gene gets turned on in a cell to make RNA and proteins. Gene expression may be measured by looking at the RNA, or the protein made from the RNA, or what the protein does in a cell.
Research shows long non-coding RNAs regulate circadian clocks

Research shows long non-coding RNAs regulate circadian clocks

Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center have found a new way that internal body clocks are regulated by a type of molecule known as long non-coding RNA. [More]
BGRF scientists propose Oncofinder method for accurate analysis of gene expression data

BGRF scientists propose Oncofinder method for accurate analysis of gene expression data

Scientists from the Biogerontology Research Foundation (BGRF), a UK-based charity founded to support ageing research and address the challenges of a rapidly ageing population, propose a new concept for signalome-wide analysis of changes in intracellular pathways, called OncoFinder, which allows for accurate and robust cross-platform analysis of gene expression data. [More]
Research offers promise for personalized RNA combination therapies to treat lung cancer

Research offers promise for personalized RNA combination therapies to treat lung cancer

Small RNA molecules, including microRNAs (miRNAs) and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), offer tremendous potential for new therapeutic agents to inhibit cancer cell growth. However, delivering these small RNAs to solid tumors remains a significant challenge, as the RNAs must target the correct cells and avoid being broken down by enzymes in the body. [More]
Scientists identify gene that regulates sleep and wake rhythms

Scientists identify gene that regulates sleep and wake rhythms

Scientists at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies have identified a gene that regulates sleep and wake rhythms. [More]
"Self-fitting" material precisely fills bone defects and acts as scaffold for new bone growth

"Self-fitting" material precisely fills bone defects and acts as scaffold for new bone growth

Injuries, birth defects (such as cleft palates) or surgery to remove a tumor can create gaps in bone that are too large to heal naturally. And when they occur in the head, face or jaw, these bone defects can dramatically alter a person's appearance. [More]
Blood expression levels of genes targeted by stress hormones could be biomarker for developing PTSD

Blood expression levels of genes targeted by stress hormones could be biomarker for developing PTSD

Blood expression levels of genes targeted by the stress hormones called glucocorticoids could be a physical measure, or biomarker, of risk for developing Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), according to a study conducted in rats by researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published August 11 in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS). [More]
Research shows new drug candidate can stop tumor growth in animal models

Research shows new drug candidate can stop tumor growth in animal models

It's a trick any cat burglar knows: to open a locked door, slide a credit card past the latch. Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) tried a similar strategy when they attempted to disrupt the function of MYC, a cancer regulator thought to be "undruggable." [More]
Scientists aim to understand and treat painful bladder condition

Scientists aim to understand and treat painful bladder condition

Taking advantage of technology that can analyze tissue samples and measure the activity of thousands of genes at once, scientists at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center are on a mission to better understand and treat interstitial cystitis (IC), a painful and difficult-to-diagnose bladder condition. [More]
Subtle changes in gene can predict how brain reacts to stress

Subtle changes in gene can predict how brain reacts to stress

Scientists studying depression in teens have discovered that subtle changes in a gene can predict how the brain reacts to stress, which can cause such health issues as depression, post-traumatic stress disorder and obesity. [More]
New web-based tool enables researchers to quickly visualize genomic information

New web-based tool enables researchers to quickly visualize genomic information

Scientists at the University of Maryland have developed a new, web-based tool that enables researchers to quickly and easily visualize and compare large amounts of genomic information resulting from high-throughput sequencing experiments. [More]
Study provides platform for detailed study of nerve injury and repair during Wallerian degeneration

Study provides platform for detailed study of nerve injury and repair during Wallerian degeneration

Wallerian degeneration is a subject of major interest in neuroscience. A large number of genes are differentially regulated during the distinct stages of Wallerian degeneration: transcription factor activation, immune response, myelin cell differentiation and dedifferentiation. [More]
Montefiore-Einstein investigators to present new findings from eight abstracts at IFHNOS 2014

Montefiore-Einstein investigators to present new findings from eight abstracts at IFHNOS 2014

Clinicians and researchers from Montefiore Medical Center and the Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University will present new findings from eight abstracts at the International Federation of Head and Neck Oncologic Societies World Congress being held July 26 - July 30 in New York. [More]
Scientists discover new pathway to manipulate, maintain human ESCs in a "na-ve"

Scientists discover new pathway to manipulate, maintain human ESCs in a "na-ve"

For years, researchers and patients have hoped that embryonic stem cells (ESCs)-capable of forming nearly any cell type in the body-could provide insight into numerous diseases perhaps even be used to treat them. Yet progress has been hampered by the inability to transfer research and tools from mouse ESC studies to their human counterparts, in part because human ESCs are "primed" and slightly less plastic than the mouse cells. [More]
People with higher levels of brown fat have better blood sugar control

People with higher levels of brown fat have better blood sugar control

Researchers at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston have shown for the first time that people with higher levels of brown fat, or brown adipose tissue, in their bodies have better blood sugar control, higher insulin sensitivity and a better metabolism for burning fat stores. [More]
Marker identified for population of renal cancer cells with stem-cell-like features

Marker identified for population of renal cancer cells with stem-cell-like features

Researchers have identified a population of clear cell renal cell carcinoma cells positive for the CTR2 marker that possess some stem-cell-like features and are able to induce an angiogenic response in vivo. [More]
Marker identified for population of renal cancer cells with stem-cell-like features

Marker identified for population of renal cancer cells with stem-cell-like features

Researchers have identified a population of clear cell renal cell carcinoma cells positive for the CTR2 marker that possess some stem-cell-like features and are able to induce an angiogenic response in vivo. Targeting CTR2 was shown to decrease drug resistance to cisplatin. [More]
Saudi Arabian researchers detect genetic fragments of MERS-CoV in the air of camel barn

Saudi Arabian researchers detect genetic fragments of MERS-CoV in the air of camel barn

Saudi Arabian researchers have detected genetic fragments of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) in the air of a barn holding a camel infected with the virus. The work, published this week in mBio-, the online open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology, indicates that further studies are needed to see if the disease can be transmitted through the air. [More]
Marmoset's unique rapid reproductive system sheds new light on evolution and primate biology

Marmoset's unique rapid reproductive system sheds new light on evolution and primate biology

A team of scientists from around the world led by Baylor College of Medicine and Washington University in St. Louis has completed the genome sequence of the common marmoset - the first sequence of a New World Monkey - providing new information about the marmoset's unique rapid reproductive system, physiology and growth, shedding new light on primate biology and evolution. [More]
Scientists identify genes that may help predict steroid responsiveness in people with EoE

Scientists identify genes that may help predict steroid responsiveness in people with EoE

Results from a clinical trial show that high doses of the corticosteroid fluticasone propionate safely and effectively induce remission in many people with eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), a chronic inflammatory disease of the esophagus characterized by high levels of white blood cells called eosinophils. [More]
Doctor maps path of discovery for developing potential anticancer agent

Doctor maps path of discovery for developing potential anticancer agent

The journal Cancer Cell today published research led by Dr. Tak Mak mapping the path of discovery to developing a potential anticancer agent. [More]