Gene Expression News and Research RSS Feed - Gene Expression News and Research

Gene Expression is the process by which a gene gets turned on in a cell to make RNA and proteins. Gene expression may be measured by looking at the RNA, or the protein made from the RNA, or what the protein does in a cell.
Salk researchers move one step closer to making cures for genetic diseases a reality

Salk researchers move one step closer to making cures for genetic diseases a reality

Healthy brain, muscle, eye and heart cells would improve the lives of tens of thousands of people around the world with debilitating mitochondrial diseases. Now, researchers at the Salk Institute have gotten one step closer to making such cures a reality: they've turned cells from patients into healthy, mutation-free stem cells that can then become any cell type. [More]
Salk professor receives Allen Distinguished Investigator award to uncover biology of Alzheimer's disease

Salk professor receives Allen Distinguished Investigator award to uncover biology of Alzheimer's disease

The Salk Institute today announced that Rusty Gage, Salk professor in the Laboratory of Genetics, has been selected as one of five recipients of the Paul G. Allen Family Foundation's Allen Distinguished Investigator (ADI) program and will be awarded $1.5 million to conduct his research. These researchers have projects aimed at uncovering the elusive biological foundations of Alzheimer's disease. [More]
Paul G. Allen Family Foundation announces ADI grants for Alzheimer's disease research

Paul G. Allen Family Foundation announces ADI grants for Alzheimer's disease research

The Paul G. Allen Family Foundation announced today the award of Allen Distinguished Investigator (ADI) grants to five teams of researchers with projects that will open new and innovative avenues of research in Alzheimer's disease by uncovering its elusive biological roots. [More]
Novel gene therapy control system regulates expression of therapeutic transgenes

Novel gene therapy control system regulates expression of therapeutic transgenes

Korean researchers have described a novel control system to regulate the expression of a therapeutic transgene by targeting the passenger strand of a microRNA (miR-122) linked to the transgene. [More]
New understanding of keratin 17 protein could lead to development of better ways to prevent cancer

New understanding of keratin 17 protein could lead to development of better ways to prevent cancer

New research from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health suggests that the protein keratin 17 - the presence of which is used in the lab to detect and stage various types of cancers - is not just a biomarker for the disease, but may play a critical role in tumor growth. [More]
Study discovers potential link between inherited genome-wide DNA sequences and CAD

Study discovers potential link between inherited genome-wide DNA sequences and CAD

A study to examine recessively inherited genome-wide DNA sequences has for the first time discovered a potential link with Britain's biggest killer - Coronary Artery Disease (CAD). [More]
Four young scientists named recipients of Damon Runyon-Sohn Pediatric Cancer Research Fellowship Award

Four young scientists named recipients of Damon Runyon-Sohn Pediatric Cancer Research Fellowship Award

The Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation has named four outstanding young scientists as recipients of the prestigious Damon Runyon-Sohn Pediatric Cancer Research Fellowship Award, committing nearly $875,000 to help address a critical shortage of funding for pediatric cancer research. [More]
Chromosomal abnormalities in embryos created for IVF can be predicted at earliest stage of human development

Chromosomal abnormalities in embryos created for IVF can be predicted at earliest stage of human development

Scientists at Oregon Health & Science University, Stanford University, University of Valencia and IGENOMIX have discovered that chromosomal abnormalities in human embryos created for in vitro fertilization, or IVF, can be predicted within the first 30 hours of development at the cell-1 stage which results from the union of a female egg and male sperm. [More]
MU scientists develop RNAMiner tool to make genetic science easier

MU scientists develop RNAMiner tool to make genetic science easier

Technology rapidly is advancing the study of genetics and the search for causes of major diseases. Analysis of genomic sequences that once took days or months now can be performed in a matter of hours. Yet, for most genetic scientists, the lack of access to computer servers and programs capable of quickly handling vast amounts of data can hinder genetic advancements. [More]
UC researcher awarded NCI grant to study effect of MED1 protein on HER2-positive breast cancer

UC researcher awarded NCI grant to study effect of MED1 protein on HER2-positive breast cancer

Xiaoting Zhang, PhD, associate professor in the Department of Cancer Biology at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, has received a $1.8 million, five-year, R01 award (R01CA197865) from the National Cancer Institute to continue breast cancer research focusing on the function of the protein MED1 on HER2-positive breast cancer. [More]
Scientists identify mechanism that reveals why stem cells undergo self-renewing divisions

Scientists identify mechanism that reveals why stem cells undergo self-renewing divisions

UT Southwestern Medical Center scientists collaborating with University of Michigan researchers have found a previously unidentified mechanism that helps explain why stem cells undergo self-renewing divisions but their offspring do not. [More]
Histones steadily replaced in brain cells throughout life, find Mount Sinai researchers

Histones steadily replaced in brain cells throughout life, find Mount Sinai researchers

For decades, researchers in the genetics field have theorized that the protein spools around which DNA is wound, histones, remain constant in the brain, never changing after development in the womb. [More]
Certain colon cancer genes take a step back to move forward

Certain colon cancer genes take a step back to move forward

Recent Weizmann Institute studies are revealing a complex picture of cancer progression in which certain genes that drive tumor growth in the earlier stages get suppressed in later stages - taking a step back to move forward. [More]
Dietary fat intake could potentially ease mitochondrial disease, shows research

Dietary fat intake could potentially ease mitochondrial disease, shows research

Mice that have a genetic version of mitochondrial disease can easily be mistaken for much older animals by the time they are nine months old: they have thinning grey hair, osteoporosis, poor hearing, infertility, heart problems and have lost weight. Despite having this disease at birth, these mice have a "secret weapon" in their youth that staves off signs of aging for a time. [More]
Breast tumors have something in common with embryos, say MD Anderson researchers

Breast tumors have something in common with embryos, say MD Anderson researchers

It may seem incredulous, but breast tumors may have something in common with embryos ... at least in mice, say researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. [More]
TSRI scientists find five different miRNAs involved in memory formation

TSRI scientists find five different miRNAs involved in memory formation

Scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have found that a type of genetic material called “microRNA” plays surprisingly different roles in the formation of memory in animal models. In some cases, these RNAs increase memory, while others decrease it. [More]
Researchers discover mechanism that regulates metabolism

Researchers discover mechanism that regulates metabolism

The protein complex mTORC1 is a central regulator of cell metabolism. In the active state, it stimulates anabolic processes and increases the production and storage of proteins and lipids. Researchers from the German Leibniz Institute for Age Research in Jena and the Dutch Ageing Institute ERIBA in Groningen discovered a mechanism how mTORC1 regulates metabolism: It controls the expression of a specific variant of the transcriptional regulator C/EBPβ. [More]
Veracyte named to Bay Area News Group's Top Workplaces list for second consecutive year

Veracyte named to Bay Area News Group's Top Workplaces list for second consecutive year

Veracyte, Inc., a molecular diagnostics company pioneering the field of molecular cytology, today announced that it has been named to the Bay Area News Group's prestigious Top Workplaces list for the second year in a row. The news group selects Top Workplace winners based solely on an annual survey of Bay Area-company employees. [More]
NIDA announces recipients of Avenir Award programs for HIV/AIDS, genetics or epigenetics research

NIDA announces recipients of Avenir Award programs for HIV/AIDS, genetics or epigenetics research

The National Institute on Drug Abuse today announced the first six recipients of its two newly developed Avenir Award programs for HIV/AIDS and genetics or epigenetics research. The Avenir (meaning "future" in French) Awards support early stage investigators who propose highly innovative studies. The six scientists will each receive up to $300,000 per year for five years to support their research. [More]
E2F4 biomarker can help predict prognosis and response to BCG therapy in bladder cancer

E2F4 biomarker can help predict prognosis and response to BCG therapy in bladder cancer

Investigators from Dartmouth's Norris Cotton Cancer Center harnessed genomic data to discover that the previously identified E2F4 signature in breast cancer can be utilized to predict prognosis and response to therapy in bladder cancer. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement