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Gene Expression is the process by which a gene gets turned on in a cell to make RNA and proteins. Gene expression may be measured by looking at the RNA, or the protein made from the RNA, or what the protein does in a cell.
Case Western Reserve researchers explore ways to treat, cure TB

Case Western Reserve researchers explore ways to treat, cure TB

After discovering a unique group of people resistant to tuberculosis (TB) infection, Case Western Reserve researchers are leading an international team dedicated to understanding exactly how they fight off a disease that claims 1.5 million lives each year. [More]
Pseudogenes may play role in cancer development, shows study

Pseudogenes may play role in cancer development, shows study

Pseudogenes, a sub-class of long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) that developed from the genome's 20,000 protein-coding genes but lost the ability to produce proteins, have long been considered nothing more than genomic "junk." Yet the retention of these 20,000 mysterious remnants during evolution has suggested that they may in fact possess biological functions and contribute to the development of disease. [More]
Penn Med's BLINKER Team named one of 16 finalists in NIH 'Follow that Cell Challenge'

Penn Med's BLINKER Team named one of 16 finalists in NIH 'Follow that Cell Challenge'

James Eberwine, PhD, the Elmer Holmes Bobst Professor of Systems Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, was named one of 16 finalists in the first phase of the Follow that Cell Challenge funded by the National Institutes of Health. The competition was run by crowdsourcing company Innocentive and 687 designated "solvers" entered initially. [More]
Novel molecule inhibits cancer-causing transcription factors

Novel molecule inhibits cancer-causing transcription factors

A novel molecule designed by scientists at the University of Massachusetts Medical School and the University of Virginia inhibits progression of a hard-to-treat form of recurring acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in patient tissue. [More]
MD Anderson, NanoString Technologies collaborate to accelerate development of 'multi-omic' assays

MD Anderson, NanoString Technologies collaborate to accelerate development of 'multi-omic' assays

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center and NanoString Technologies, Inc., a provider of life science tools for translational research and molecular diagnostic products, today announced a multi-year collaboration to accelerate the development and adoption of a new type of assay based on NanoString's nCounter Analysis System. [More]
UTSA biologist recognized for showing leadership in advancing the discipline of reproductive biology

UTSA biologist recognized for showing leadership in advancing the discipline of reproductive biology

John McCarrey, professor of biology in the UTSA College of Sciences, has been selected to receive the Distinguished Service Award from the Society for the Study of Reproduction. [More]
Roche launches new protein melting application for real-time PCR LightCycler 1536 instrument

Roche launches new protein melting application for real-time PCR LightCycler 1536 instrument

Roche announced today the introduction of a new protein melting application for its high-throughput, real-time PCR LightCycler 1536 instrument. The fully automated platform now allows life science researchers to perform thermal shift assays (TSAs) in 1536-well applications quickly and consistently. [More]
Study finds link between neurodegenerative disorders and inflammation

Study finds link between neurodegenerative disorders and inflammation

Researchers from McMaster University and the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York have discovered that a protein associated with neurodegenerative diseases like ALS also plays an important role in the body's natural antiviral response. [More]
CNIO researchers describe presence of MDH2 gene mutations in hereditary neuroendocrine tumors

CNIO researchers describe presence of MDH2 gene mutations in hereditary neuroendocrine tumors

Researchers in the Hereditary Endocrine Cancer Group of the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre -- led by Alberto Cascón and Mercedes Robledo -- have described the presence of mutations in the MDH2 gene, in a family with very rare neuroendocrine tumours associated with a high hereditary component: pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas that affect the suprarenal and parathyroid glands (groups of chromaffin cells in the central nervous system), respectively. [More]
Merck Serono, Intrexon partner to develop and commercialize CAR-T cancer therapies

Merck Serono, Intrexon partner to develop and commercialize CAR-T cancer therapies

Merck Serono, the biopharmaceutical business of Merck, and Intrexon Corporation, today announced an exclusive strategic collaboration and license agreement to develop and commercialize Chimeric Antigen Receptor T-cell (CAR-T) cancer therapies. [More]
One round of adenosine triphosphate turnover sufficient for SNARE complex disassembly

One round of adenosine triphosphate turnover sufficient for SNARE complex disassembly

In 2013, James E. Rothman, Randy W. Schekman, and Thomas C. Südhof won the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for their discoveries of molecular machineries for vesicle trafficking, a major transport system in cells for maintaining cellular processes. Vesicle traffic acts as a kind of "home-delivery service" in cells. [More]
3D respiratory tissue model shown to be effective for measuring impact of chemicals

3D respiratory tissue model shown to be effective for measuring impact of chemicals

A 3-dimensional model of human respiratory tissue has been shown to be an effective platform for measuring the impact of chemicals, like those found in cigarette smoke, or other aerosols on the lung. [More]
Regulus' RG-012 receives orphan medicinal product designation in EU for treatment of Alport syndrome

Regulus' RG-012 receives orphan medicinal product designation in EU for treatment of Alport syndrome

Regulus Therapeutics Inc., a biopharmaceutical company leading the discovery and development of innovative medicines targeting microRNAs, announced today that the European Commission has granted orphan medicinal product designation for RG-012, a single stranded, chemically modified oligonucleotide that binds to and inhibits the function of microRNA-21 ("miR-21") for the treatment of Alport syndrome, a life-threatening genetic kidney disease with no approved therapy. [More]
New study reveals how cells sort out loops meant to encode microRNAs

New study reveals how cells sort out loops meant to encode microRNAs

Just as two DNA strands naturally arrange themselves into a helix, DNA's molecular cousin RNA can form hairpin-like loops. But unlike DNA, which has a single job, RNA can play many parts -- including acting as a precursor for small molecules that block the activity of genes. These small RNA molecules must be trimmed from long hairpin-loop structures, raising a question: How do cells know which RNA loops need to be processed this way and which don't? [More]
Vitamin D3 and metformin show promising results in preventing colorectal cancer

Vitamin D3 and metformin show promising results in preventing colorectal cancer

The concept was simple: If two compounds each individually show promise in preventing colon cancer, surely it's worth trying the two together to see if even greater impact is possible. [More]
Low zinc levels in older adults correspond with increased chronic inflammation

Low zinc levels in older adults correspond with increased chronic inflammation

Zinc, an important mineral in human health, appears to affect how the immune system responds to stimulation, especially inflammation, new research from Oregon State University shows. [More]
Researchers find key step in understanding genetic mechanism of plants' environmental adaptability

Researchers find key step in understanding genetic mechanism of plants' environmental adaptability

A fundamental question pursued by plant scientists worldwide for the past decade has been answered by researchers led by the University of Sydney in Australia. [More]
BCM-95 Curcumin improves chemotherapy's effectiveness in killing chemoresistant cancer cells

BCM-95 Curcumin improves chemotherapy's effectiveness in killing chemoresistant cancer cells

Cancer cell resistance to chemotherapy is a major cause of death in patients with colorectal cancer. In a first-of-its-kind study, BCM-95 Curcumin was found to improve chemotherapy's effectiveness in killing chemoresistant cells via a mechanism not previously identified. [More]
New approach to improve cardiac regeneration

New approach to improve cardiac regeneration

The heart tissue of mammals has limited capacity to regenerate after an injury such as a heart attack, in part due to the inability to reactivate a cardiac muscle cell and proliferation program. Recent studies have indicated a low level of cardiac muscle cell (cardiomyocytes) proliferation in adult mammals, but it is insufficient to repair damaged hearts. [More]
GenomeNext completes whole genome sequencing analysis at unprecedented 1,000 genomes per day

GenomeNext completes whole genome sequencing analysis at unprecedented 1,000 genomes per day

GenomeNext, LLC, a leader in genomic data management and integrated analysis, announced today that, through the "Intel Heads In The Clouds Challenge on Amazon Web Services" with support from JHC Technology, and in conjunction with Nationwide Children's Hospital, has benchmarked whole genome sequencing analysis at an unprecedented 1,000 genomes per day. [More]
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