Gene Silencing News and Research RSS Feed - Gene Silencing News and Research

KAUST researchers develop biocompatible nanostructures for use in gene delivery

KAUST researchers develop biocompatible nanostructures for use in gene delivery

A tiny therapeutic delivery system that can control the body’s ability to manufacture proteins has been developed by Saudi Arabia's King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) researchers. [More]
Researchers find switch that helps restore damaged axons

Researchers find switch that helps restore damaged axons

Researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have found a switch that redirects helper cells in the peripheral nervous system into "repair" mode, a form that restores damaged axons. [More]
Novel dual molecular tuner offers easy way to perform in-depth analyses in mammalian cells

Novel dual molecular tuner offers easy way to perform in-depth analyses in mammalian cells

A research team headed by investigators at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai has developed a tool that allows scientists to quickly manipulate levels of two proteins in the same cell. [More]
Overcoming gene silencing barriers to target neurological conditions: an interview with Dr Errol de Souza

Overcoming gene silencing barriers to target neurological conditions: an interview with Dr Errol de Souza

Many gene mutations that cause neurological disorders have been identified. For example, in a rare neurological disorder such as Huntington’s disease, an autosomal dominant mutation through expansion of CAG (cytosine-adenine-guanine) triplet repeats in the gene coding for the Huntingtin protein results in abnormal protein production. [More]
Researchers study how skin stem cells respond to forces

Researchers study how skin stem cells respond to forces

All cells share the same genetic code, no matter if they are skin or brain cells. However, these cells are exposed to very different types of mechanical environments and mechanical stresses. [More]
Researchers identify PKD1 protein as potential cause for impaired insulin signaling in diabetics

Researchers identify PKD1 protein as potential cause for impaired insulin signaling in diabetics

Medication can help trigger the enzyme that kick starts insulin production in the body, but the drugs don't always work for those who are obese or diabetic, and most need to regulate their glucose and insulin levels. That's why a recent discovery made by Rudy Valentine and a team of researchers holds so much promise. [More]
New topical film patch can effectively close dermal wounds, reduce scarring

New topical film patch can effectively close dermal wounds, reduce scarring

Currently there is no product available based on polymer film containing active molecules to accelerate dermal wound healing that also reduces the scar formation. [More]
Researchers discover mechanism of gene silencing in hormone-dependent breast cancer cells

Researchers discover mechanism of gene silencing in hormone-dependent breast cancer cells

Sometimes, the silencing of a gene is as important as its activation. Nonetheless, up to now, most studies on hormone-mediated gene regulation have focused on researching the factors that influence the activation of certain genes. Little attention has been paid to gene silencing. [More]
Alnylam reports new results from investigational RNAi therapeutic programs

Alnylam reports new results from investigational RNAi therapeutic programs

Alnylam Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (Nasdaq: ALNY), the leading RNAi therapeutics company, announced today preliminary results from its ongoing Phase 2 open-label extension (OLE) studies with patisiran and revusiran, both investigational RNAi therapeutics targeting transthyretin (TTR) for the treatment of hereditary TTR-mediated amyloidosis (hATTR amyloidosis). [More]
New technology could help deliver treatments for brain injuries

New technology could help deliver treatments for brain injuries

A new study led by scientists at the Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute describes a technology that could lead to new therapeutics for traumatic brain injuries. The discovery, published today in Nature Communications, provides a means of homing drugs or nanoparticles to injured areas of the brain. [More]
PharmaMar announces initiation of pivotal plitidepsin clinical trial in patients with T-cell lymphomas

PharmaMar announces initiation of pivotal plitidepsin clinical trial in patients with T-cell lymphomas

PharmaMar today announced the start of a multicenter, prospective, pivotal study to analyze the efficacy of the antitumoral compound of marine origin, plitidepsin in patients with relapsed and refractory angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma. [More]
Phase I study of triple drug combination shows promise in multiple myeloma patients

Phase I study of triple drug combination shows promise in multiple myeloma patients

PharmaMar announces the positive results from a Phase I study of plitidepsin in combination with bortezomib and dexamethasone in patients with relapsed and/or refractory multiple myeloma. [More]
Researchers develop novel ss-siRNAs to turn off disease-related genes

Researchers develop novel ss-siRNAs to turn off disease-related genes

Combining the therapeutic potential and advantages of existing oligonucleotide-based approaches to turn off disease-related genes, a type of single-stranded silencing RNAs (ss-siRNAs) has shown significantly improved potency and activity. [More]
Histone mutation linked to fatal pediatric brain tumor

Histone mutation linked to fatal pediatric brain tumor

A single defect in a gene that codes for a histone — a "spool" that wraps idle DNA — is linked to pediatric cancers in a study published today in the journal Science. [More]
Plitidepsin in combination with dexamethasone shows top-line results in Phase III multiple myeloma trial

Plitidepsin in combination with dexamethasone shows top-line results in Phase III multiple myeloma trial

PharmaMar today announced positive top-line results of its Phase III clinical trial -ADMYRE- with Aplidin (plitidepsin) in combination with dexamethasone versus dexamethasone alone in patients with relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma (MM). [More]
Altered metabolism of two essential amino acids helps drive development of glioblastoma

Altered metabolism of two essential amino acids helps drive development of glioblastoma

The altered metabolism of two essential amino acids helps drive the development of the most common and lethal form of brain cancer, according to a new study led by researchers at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute. [More]
Mtss1 'tumour suppressor' for CML

Mtss1 'tumour suppressor' for CML

The metastasis suppressor 1 protein acts a tumour suppressor in chronic myeloid leukaemia stem cells, reveals research published in Leukemia. [More]
ST Asia signs licensing deal with PharmaMar to distribute new multiple myeloma drug in South East Asia

ST Asia signs licensing deal with PharmaMar to distribute new multiple myeloma drug in South East Asia

International biopharmaceutical company Specialised Therapeutics Asia will supply and distribute a novel oncology drug candidate throughout South East Asia, following an exclusive licensing deal with European pharmaceutical company PharmaMar. [More]

Research sheds light on mechanism by which hemangioblasts become blood cells

A research group led by Lecturer Makoto Kobayashi of the University of Tsukuba Faculty of Medicine, has managed to shed light on the puzzling mechanism by which hemangioblasts become blood cells. Although hemangioblasts are the common precursor cells for blood cells and vascular endothelia that are present during the fetal period, the discovery of hemangioblasts in adult organisms has begun to garner attention from the medical world. [More]
New TAU study offers tangible hope of curing Mantle Cell Lymphoma

New TAU study offers tangible hope of curing Mantle Cell Lymphoma

With a median survival rate of just five to seven years, Mantle Cell Lymphoma (MCL) is considered the most aggressive known blood cancer -- and available therapies are scarce. Three thousand Americans are diagnosed with MCL every year, and despite progress in personalized therapies to treat metastases elsewhere in the body, systemic therapeutic drug delivery to cancerous blood cells continues to challenge the world of cancer research. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement