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Gene therapy is an experimental technique that uses genes to treat or prevent disease. In the future, this technique may allow doctors to treat a disorder by inserting a gene into a patient’s cells instead of using drugs or surgery.
Researchers discover new marker derived from human umbilical cord blood

Researchers discover new marker derived from human umbilical cord blood

The development of stem cell therapies to cure a variety of diseases depends on the ability to characterize stem cell populations based on cell surface markers. [More]

European scientists set up new therapeutic approaches to tackle gene defects

On 15th April is the 1st International Pompe Disease Day, a campaign to raise awareness of this rare but severe gene defect. Pompe Disease is only one of more than 40 metabolic disorders that mainly affect children under the age of 10, often with devastating consequences. [More]
Concise analysis of cancer drug delivery markets

Concise analysis of cancer drug delivery markets

Research and Markets (http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/qxfqmk/drug_delivery_in) has announced the addition of a new report "Drug Delivery in Cancer - Technologies, Markets and Companies" to their offering. [More]

Inserm plays key role in developing European research

The French National Institute of Health and Medical Research (Inserm) is currently the leading biomedical research organisation in Europe, and plays a key role in developing European research. To mark its 50th anniversary, Inserm wanted to assess the perceptions of Europeans regarding biomedical research. [More]
Study explores relationship between genetics and lifestyle in development of AD

Study explores relationship between genetics and lifestyle in development of AD

A global study involving more than one million people worldwide will explore the relationship between genetics and lifestyle in the development of Alzheimer's disease. [More]
Expert in gene therapy joins The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

Expert in gene therapy joins The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

Beverly L. Davidson, Ph.D., a nationally prominent expert in gene therapy, is joining The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) today. [More]
Concise analysis of cancer gene therapy market

Concise analysis of cancer gene therapy market

Research and Markets has announced the addition of the "Cancer Gene Therapy Market Analysis" report to their offering. [More]
Cedars-Sinai earns grant to conduct clinical trial of gene therapy product for patients with Lou Gehrig's disease

Cedars-Sinai earns grant to conduct clinical trial of gene therapy product for patients with Lou Gehrig's disease

The Cedars-Sinai Regenerative Medicine Institute has received a $2.5 million grant from the Department of Defense to conduct animal studies that, if successful, could provide the basis for a clinical trial of a gene therapy product for patients with Lou Gehrig's disease, also called amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS. [More]
Study points to potential culprit that kills motor neurons in ALS

Study points to potential culprit that kills motor neurons in ALS

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, also known as Lou Gehrig's disease, is marked by a cascade of cellular and inflammatory events that weakens and kills vital motor neurons in the brain and spinal cord. The process is complex, involving cells that ordinarily protect the neurons from harm. Now, a new study by scientists in The Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital points to a potential culprit in this good-cell-gone-bad scenario, a key step toward the ultimate goal of developing a treatment. [More]

Genable Technologies, Spark Therapeutics to advance novel therapy for rare form of retinitis pigmentosa

Spark Therapeutics and Genable Technologies announced today that they have entered into a collaboration agreement for Genable's lead therapeutic to treat rhodopsin-linked autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (RHO adRP), GT038. [More]
XBP1 gene plays pivotal role in the growth and progression of triple negative breast cancer

XBP1 gene plays pivotal role in the growth and progression of triple negative breast cancer

Scientists from Weill Cornell Medical College and Houston Methodist have found that a gene previously unassociated with breast cancer plays a pivotal role in the growth and progression of the triple negative form of the disease, a particularly deadly strain that often has few treatment options. Their research, published in this week's Nature, suggests that targeting the gene may be a new approach to treating the disease. [More]
Marina Cavazzana, Adrian J. Thrasher honored with Pioneer Award for gene therapy

Marina Cavazzana, Adrian J. Thrasher honored with Pioneer Award for gene therapy

Marina Cavazzana, MD, PhD, Paris Descartes University, France and Adrian J. Thrasher, MD, PhD, University College London Institute of Child Health, UK, have been honored with the Pioneer Award for basic and clinical gene therapy for immunodeficiency disorders. [More]
Researchers develop adjuvant which enhances effect of virus transduction

Researchers develop adjuvant which enhances effect of virus transduction

Lentiviruses, which belong to the family of retroviruses, are used as vectors to exchange genetic material in cells and can be used to replace a defective gene as defined by gene therapy. [More]
Abingworth announces final closing of £225M ($375M) fund

Abingworth announces final closing of £225M ($375M) fund

Abingworth, the international investment group dedicated to life sciences and healthcare, today announced the final closing of its £225m ($375m) fund, Abingworth Bioventures VI (ABV VI). ABV VI, Abingworth's 10th life sciences fund, exceeded its target of £200 million and invests in life sciences and healthcare both in Europe and the US. [More]
Vaccine targeting tumors could initiate immune response to fight cancer

Vaccine targeting tumors could initiate immune response to fight cancer

Cincinnati Cancer Center (CCC) and UC Cancer Institute researchers have found that a vaccine, targeting tumors that produce a certain protein and receptor responsible for communication between cells and the body's immune system, could initiate the immune response to fight cancer. [More]
Study highlights the importance of personalized medicine for treating cancer

Study highlights the importance of personalized medicine for treating cancer

If a driver is traveling to New York City, I-95 might be their route of choice. But they could also take I-78, I-87 or any number of alternate routes. Most cancers begin similarly, with many possible routes to the same disease. A new study found evidence that assessing the route to cancer on a case-by-case basis might make more sense than basing a patient's cancer treatment on commonly disrupted genes and pathways. [More]

European Commission invests nearly $475 million in gene transfer and gene therapy projects

Over the past three funding stages, the European Commission has invested nearly $475 million in 100 projects in the gene transfer and gene therapy field. [More]
Cell therapy: A powerful treatment for cancer patients

Cell therapy: A powerful treatment for cancer patients

Investigators from Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center have reported more encouraging news about one of the most exciting methods of cancer treatment today. The largest clinical study ever conducted to date of patients with advanced leukemia found that 88 percent achieved complete remissions after being treated with genetically modified versions of their own immune cells. [More]

Study finds Cyclin A2 protein induces cardiac regeneration after myocardial infarction

After a heart attack, there is often permanent damage to a portion of the heart. This happens, in part, because cardiac muscle cells are terminally differentiated and cannot proliferate after blood flow is blocked off to the heart. [More]
NIH-funded session in Bethesda to heighten awareness of underactive bladder

NIH-funded session in Bethesda to heighten awareness of underactive bladder

Underactive bladder, estimated to affect more than 20 percent of the elderly population, is an unrecognized disease that has a major influence on the health and independence of seniors. [More]