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Scientists reveal mechanism involved in regulation of lymphangiogenesis

Scientists reveal mechanism involved in regulation of lymphangiogenesis

After an injury to tissues, such as in organ transplantation, the body grows new lymphatic vessels in a process known as lymphangiogenesis. A new study in Nature Communications reveals a mechanism involved in the regulation of this process, specifically in corneal transplants and infectious eye disease. [More]
Study shows only 15% of children achieve 60 minutes of daily MVPA

Study shows only 15% of children achieve 60 minutes of daily MVPA

Children are far from meeting national guidelines for physical activity, and girls are at greatest risk of falling short of recommendations according to a study measuring the physical activity of 453 schoolchildren in Massachusetts during a one-week period. [More]
Virus-generated DNA lurking between human genes, show research

Virus-generated DNA lurking between human genes, show research

Think your DNA is all human? Think again. And a new discovery suggests it's even less human than scientists previously thought. [More]
ACI announces investment in Sphera Bluoshen to support development of healthcare technology

ACI announces investment in Sphera Bluoshen to support development of healthcare technology

Angola Capital Investments, a leading international investment firm headquartered in Angola, announced its investment in Sphera Bluoshen S.A. to support the development of the finest healthcare technology around the globe. [More]
Pioglitazone drug may prevent recurrent stroke and heart attacks

Pioglitazone drug may prevent recurrent stroke and heart attacks

Pioglitazone, a drug used for type 2 diabetes, may prevent recurrent stroke and heart attacks in people with insulin resistance but without diabetes. [More]
Behavioral interventions motivate doctors to reduce unnecessary antibiotic prescriptions

Behavioral interventions motivate doctors to reduce unnecessary antibiotic prescriptions

Behavioral interventions that appealed to doctors' competitive spirits and desire to strengthen their reputations motivated them to significantly reduce unnecessary antibiotic prescriptions, a new study shows. [More]
LMU researchers reveal how crystalline deposits induce cell death

LMU researchers reveal how crystalline deposits induce cell death

Crystal formation plays a defining role in the pathogenesis of a range of common diseases, such as gout and atherosclerosis. Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich researchers led by Hans-Joachim Anders have now elucidated how the insoluble deposits induce cell death. [More]
Sensitive computational method could help reveal effect of the immune system on cancer

Sensitive computational method could help reveal effect of the immune system on cancer

A study by researchers at Norris Cotton Cancer Center has shown that a very sensitive computational method can be used to reveal the human immune system's effect on cancer. The Dartmouth study was the first to perform an in-depth computational examination of how immune activity translates to prognosis in breast cancer. [More]
JINARC (tolvaptan) accepted for use in Scotland for ADPKD treatment

JINARC (tolvaptan) accepted for use in Scotland for ADPKD treatment

From today, people in Scotland with the genetic kidney disease ADPKD could benefit from JINARC® (tolvaptan) following advice issued by the Scottish Medicines Consortium (SMC) for its use in adults with chronic kidney disease (CKD) stages 1-3 at the start of treatment with evidence of rapidly progressing disease. [More]
Study finds 50% drop in uninsured hospital stays in Medicaid expansion states

Study finds 50% drop in uninsured hospital stays in Medicaid expansion states

Just six months after opening up health insurance to more low-income people, states saw a huge drop in the amount of care their hospitals provided to uninsured patients, and a rise in care for people with coverage, a new study finds. [More]
Risk of dementia decreasing? An interview with Professor Carol Brayne, University of Cambridge

Risk of dementia decreasing? An interview with Professor Carol Brayne, University of Cambridge

In this analysis we brought together the few European studies that have looked, within geographical areas, at the prevalence or incidence of dementia in the population aged 65 and over. [More]

Main barriers to health coverage lie in perceived cost and knowledge gap, U-M study finds

If you need health care in rural Michigan, and you don't have insurance or money, you can turn to a free clinic -- like the one University of Michigan medical students run each Saturday in the tiny town of Pinckney. Fewer people need this kind of help these days, because of new insurance options made possible by the Affordable Care Act. [More]
FHI 360, Accelovance collaborate to serve international drug development research efforts

FHI 360, Accelovance collaborate to serve international drug development research efforts

Accelovance, Inc. (Accelovance), a global contract research organization (CRO) focusing in Oncology, Vaccines, and General Medicine and FHI 360, a global nonprofit organization with CRO capabilities focusing on clinical research in developing countries, have entered into a strategic alliance to more comprehensively serve the international drug development research efforts of pharmaceutical, governmental, and nonprofit organizations. [More]
People often end up in emergency room because of infection-related falls

People often end up in emergency room because of infection-related falls

People who end up in the emergency room because of a fall often are tripped up by an infection, rather than a loose throw rug or poor eyesight, suggests a study being presented at IDWeek 2015. [More]
Specific biomarker predicts which HER2-negative breast cancer patients respond to targeted therapy

Specific biomarker predicts which HER2-negative breast cancer patients respond to targeted therapy

A multicenter team led by Case Western Reserve has demonstrated that brief exposure to a targeted therapy can tell doctors which HER2-negative patients will respond — and which should switch to another kind of treatment. [More]
New method may help nurses and doctors quickly identify delirium in hospitalized older adults

New method may help nurses and doctors quickly identify delirium in hospitalized older adults

Asking just two questions may be able to help nurses and doctors quickly and easily identify delirium in hospitalized older adults, according to health researchers. [More]
Cardiovascular disease morbidity is significantly reduced through intensive management of blood pressure

Cardiovascular disease morbidity is significantly reduced through intensive management of blood pressure

According to initial results of a multi-site landmark study, led by Dominic Raj, M.D., at the George Washington University (GW) site, cardiovascular disease morbidity is significantly reduced through intensive management of high blood pressure. [More]
BIDMC researchers examine impact of note sharing on patient safety, quality of care

BIDMC researchers examine impact of note sharing on patient safety, quality of care

Researchers from Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center are homing in on the potential benefits of allowing patients access to the notes their clinicians write after a visit. An article published in the August edition of The Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Patient Safety suggests that this kind of patient engagement has the power to improve safety and quality of care. [More]
Inflammation plays role in onset of delirium in older adults

Inflammation plays role in onset of delirium in older adults

Delirium is an acute state of confusion that often affects older adults following surgery or serious illness. Now a study led by researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center confirms that inflammation - an immune response that develops when the body attempts to protect itself from harmful stimuli -- plays a role in the onset of delirium. [More]
Less invasive endovascular aortic repair benefits most patients, provides quick recovery

Less invasive endovascular aortic repair benefits most patients, provides quick recovery

Each year, nearly 40,000 Americans undergo elective surgery to repair an abdominal aortic aneurysm with the goal of preventing a life-threatening rupture of this potentially dangerous cardiovascular condition. [More]
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