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Genetics is the study of genes and heredity. Heredity is the passing of genetic information and traits (such as eye color and an increased chance of getting a certain disease) from parents to offspring.
UT Southwestern neuroscientists identify key brain cells that control circadian rhythms

UT Southwestern neuroscientists identify key brain cells that control circadian rhythms

UT Southwestern Medical Center neuroscientists have identified key cells within the brain that are critical for determining circadian rhythms, the 24-hour processes that control sleep and wake cycles, as well as other important body functions such as hormone production, metabolism, and blood pressure. [More]
New research identifies promising drug therapy target for breast cancer

New research identifies promising drug therapy target for breast cancer

The genome of a cell is under constant attack, suffering DNA damage that requires an army of repair mechanisms to keep the cell healthy and alive. Understanding the behavior of the enzymes defending these assaults helps determine how - and where - cancer gets its foothold and flourishes. [More]
CMU scientists trace the brain processes that occur while learning new technical concepts

CMU scientists trace the brain processes that occur while learning new technical concepts

For the first time, Carnegie Mellon University scientists have traced the brain processes that occur during the learning of technical concepts. Published in NeuroImage, the findings reveal how new technical knowledge is built up in the brain during the course of different learning stages. [More]
GW, Children's National researchers awarded $6.2 million grant to solve pediatric dysphagia

GW, Children's National researchers awarded $6.2 million grant to solve pediatric dysphagia

An interdisciplinary group of researchers from the George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences and Children's National Health System has been awarded a program project grant (PPG) for $6.2 million from The Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development to solve pediatric dysphagia -- a chronic difficulty with feeding and swallowing in children. [More]
Researchers identify new gene variants that could contribute to sporadic motor neurone disease

Researchers identify new gene variants that could contribute to sporadic motor neurone disease

Researchers have identified a new host of gene variants that could make people vulnerable to sporadic motor neurone disease, according to a report published today in the journal, Scientific Reports. [More]
Ruthigen, Pulmatrix sign definitive merger agreement

Ruthigen, Pulmatrix sign definitive merger agreement

Ruthigen, Inc., a biopharmaceutical company, and Pulmatrix, Inc., a Lexington, Massachusetts based clinical stage biotechnology company, announced today that on March 13, 2015, they have entered into a definitive merger agreement. [More]
Common herpes drug Valacyclovir decreases HIV-1 levels

Common herpes drug Valacyclovir decreases HIV-1 levels

Case Western Reserve researchers are part of an international team that has discovered that a common herpes drug reduces HIV-1 levels — even when patients do not have herpes. [More]
MGH study suggests that bariatric surgery can reduce risk of asthma attacks

MGH study suggests that bariatric surgery can reduce risk of asthma attacks

A study led by Massachusetts General Hospital investigators suggests that bariatric surgery can significantly reduce the risk of asthma attacks - also called exacerbations - in obese patients with asthma. [More]
Social media ratings may influence patient perceptions of hospitals, quality of care

Social media ratings may influence patient perceptions of hospitals, quality of care

Social media has become an important way for institutions to communicate - both sending messages and receiving feedback - with clients and with the general public. [More]
Scientists explore the potential genetic basis for loneliness

Scientists explore the potential genetic basis for loneliness

Loneliness may be a fundamental part of the human condition, but scientists have only recently begun exploring its causes, consequences, and potential interventions. [More]
Researchers discover gene associated with congenital anomaly of urinary tract

Researchers discover gene associated with congenital anomaly of urinary tract

An interdisciplinary team of researchers under the direction of the University of Bonn Hospital have discovered a gene which is associated with a rare congenital anomaly of the urinary tract called classic bladder exstrophy. [More]
Finding could lead to more effective, less invasive treatment for 'bubble boy' disease

Finding could lead to more effective, less invasive treatment for 'bubble boy' disease

For infants with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), something as simple as a common cold or ear infection can be fatal. Born with an incomplete immune system, kids who have SCID--also known as "bubble boy" or "bubble baby" disease--can't fight off even the mildest of germs. [More]
McGill researchers identify key mechanism by which environmental factors influence traits

McGill researchers identify key mechanism by which environmental factors influence traits

Until now scientists have believed that the variations in traits such as our height, skin colour, tendency to gain weight or not, intelligence, tendency to develop certain diseases, etc., all of them traits that exist along a continuum, were a result of both genetic and environmental factors. But they didn't know how exactly these things worked together. [More]
European scientists identify gene linked with certain types of early-onset epilepsy

European scientists identify gene linked with certain types of early-onset epilepsy

Certain types of early-onset epilepsy are caused by previously unknown mutations of a potassium channel gene, KCNA2. The mutations disrupt the electrical balance in the brain in two ways. In some patients, the flow of potassium is greatly reduced; while in others, it is raised enormously. Both states can lead to hard-to-treat epileptic seizures. Mental and motor development can come to a stop, or even to regress. [More]
Researchers gain new insights into molecular mechanisms affected by weight gain

Researchers gain new insights into molecular mechanisms affected by weight gain

Until now there have been few molecular epidemiological studies regarding the effects of weight changes on metabolism in the general population. In a recent study conducted and funded within the framework of the Competence Network Obesity, researchers at the Institute of Epidemiology II at Helmholtz Zentrum München evaluated molecular data of the KORA study. [More]
CUGH conference brings world's leading researchers together to tackle global health challenges

CUGH conference brings world's leading researchers together to tackle global health challenges

The sixth annual Consortium of Universities for Global Health conference is creating a stir by bringing together some of the world's leading researchers to tackle many of the biggest global health challenges we face. [More]
Researchers take important step in repairing the cerebral cortex of adult mouse

Researchers take important step in repairing the cerebral cortex of adult mouse

A team led by Afsaneh Gaillard (Inserm Unit 1084, Experimental and Clinical Neurosciences Laboratory, University of Poitiers), in collaboration with the Institute of Interdisciplinary Research in Human and Molecular Biology (IRIBHM) in Brussels, has just taken an important step in the area of cell therapy: repairing the cerebral cortex of the adult mouse using a graft of cortical neurons derived from embryonic stem cells. [More]
McGill researchers discover key epigenetic factor that controls development of hippocampus

McGill researchers discover key epigenetic factor that controls development of hippocampus

McGill researchers have discovered, for the first time, the importance of a key epigenetic regulator in the development of the hippocampus, a part of the brain associated with learning, memory and neural stem cells. [More]
MDC scientists identify new molecular signaling pathway that regulates placental development

MDC scientists identify new molecular signaling pathway that regulates placental development

During pregnancy, the mother supplies the fetus with nutrients and oxygen via the placenta. If placental development is impaired, this may lead to growth disorders of the embryo or to life-threatening diseases of the mother such as preeclampsia, a serious condition involving high blood pressure and increased urinary protein excretion. [More]
New study identifies genetic factors for rosacea

New study identifies genetic factors for rosacea

Today marked the publication of the first ever genome-wide association study of rosacea, a common and incurable skin disorder. Led by Dr. Anne Lynn S. Chang of Stanford University's School of Medicine, and co-authored by 23andMe, the study is the first to identify genetic factors for this condition. [More]
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