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Genetics is the study of genes and heredity. Heredity is the passing of genetic information and traits (such as eye color and an increased chance of getting a certain disease) from parents to offspring.
New study could point to potential ways to address defects in learning, memory

New study could point to potential ways to address defects in learning, memory

Just as some people seem built to run marathons and have an easier time going for miles without tiring, others are born with a knack for memorizing things, from times tables to trivia facts. These two skills—running and memorizing—are not so different as it turns out. [More]
Study suggests possibility of developing personalized treatments for brain cancer

Study suggests possibility of developing personalized treatments for brain cancer

DNA mutations can cause cancer but in some cases, more mutations may mean a better prognosis for patients. A Yale-led comprehensive genomic analysis of more than 700 brain tumors has revealed one such subtype of the most malignant brain tumor, called glioblastoma, or GBM. This subtype possesses thousands of tumor-specific DNA errors or mutations instead of dozens observed in most glioblastoma cases. It is also associated with longer survival. [More]
MGH investigators identify inflammatory molecule that plays key role in lupus

MGH investigators identify inflammatory molecule that plays key role in lupus

Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) investigators have identified an inflammatory molecule that appears to play an essential role in the autoimmune disorder systemic lupus erythematosus, commonly known as lupus. [More]
High Throughput ChIP Sequencing

High Throughput ChIP Sequencing

Chromatrap®, a business unit of Porvair Sciences, has announced a major product launch at the European Human Genetics Conference (Glasgow, UK) and the Festival of Genomics (Boston, USA) on the 6th June 2015 and 22nd-24th June 2015 respectively [More]
Amgen's Vectibix (panitumumab) receives EC approval for treatment patients with WT RAS mCRC

Amgen's Vectibix (panitumumab) receives EC approval for treatment patients with WT RAS mCRC

Amgen today announced that the European Commission approved a new use of Vectibix (panitumumab) as first-line treatment in combination with FOLFIRI for the treatment of adult patients with wild-type (WT) RAS metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). [More]
Researchers discover genetic factors key to POMC cells

Researchers discover genetic factors key to POMC cells

The little voice inside your head that tells you to eat, or stop eating, isn't a little voice - it's actually a cluster of about 10,000 specialized brain cells. And now, an international team of scientists has found tiny triggers inside those cells that give rise to this "voice", and keep it speaking throughout life. [More]
Mayo Clinic-led researchers combine genetic variants to improve identification of women with breast cancer

Mayo Clinic-led researchers combine genetic variants to improve identification of women with breast cancer

Recent large-scale genomic analyses have uncovered dozens of common genetic variants that are associated with breast cancer. Each variant, however, contributes only a tiny amount to a person's overall risk of developing the disease. [More]
New approach could help identify novel drug targets to combat lethal fungal infections

New approach could help identify novel drug targets to combat lethal fungal infections

By modifying the CRISPR-Cas genome editing system, Whitehead Institute researchers are now able to manipulate Candida albicans' genome systematically--an approach that could help identify novel targets for therapies against this serious pathogen for which there are a limited number of anti-fungal agents. [More]
Case Western Reserve researchers explore ways to treat, cure TB

Case Western Reserve researchers explore ways to treat, cure TB

After discovering a unique group of people resistant to tuberculosis (TB) infection, Case Western Reserve researchers are leading an international team dedicated to understanding exactly how they fight off a disease that claims 1.5 million lives each year. [More]
Mouse model may help understand the physiology behind complex brain disorders

Mouse model may help understand the physiology behind complex brain disorders

Complex brain disorders, such as autism or schizophrenia, still puzzle scientists because their causes lie hidden in early events of brain development, which are still poorly understood. [More]
NASH patients more likely to have increased intestinal permeability, shows study

NASH patients more likely to have increased intestinal permeability, shows study

Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), the more severe form of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) that can progress to liver fibrosis and cirrhosis, is associated with leakiness of the intestinal wall, which in turn may worsen liver disease, according to research published in Cellular and Molecular Gastroenterology and Hepatology, the new basic science journal of the American Gastroenterological Association. [More]
International researchers examine efficacy of rVSV-ZEBOV-GP Ebola vaccine

International researchers examine efficacy of rVSV-ZEBOV-GP Ebola vaccine

The World Health Organisation declared the Ebola virus outbreak a public health emergency in August 2014; since then the development of vaccines against Ebola virus has been fast tracked. [More]
Canada's VSV-EBOV Ebola vaccine proves safe, effective in Phase 1 clinical trial

Canada's VSV-EBOV Ebola vaccine proves safe, effective in Phase 1 clinical trial

The Honourable Rona Ambrose, Minister of Health, and Canada's Chief Public Health Officer, Dr. Gregory Taylor, today welcomed the news of promising trial outcomes of Canada's VSV-EBOV Ebola vaccine. The results of several studies and trials bring the world closer to ending this global outbreak through the provision of a commercially available vaccine. [More]
Low doses of imatinib drug can push immune system to combat bacterial infections

Low doses of imatinib drug can push immune system to combat bacterial infections

Low doses of the anti-cancer drug imatinib can spur the bone marrow to produce more innate immune cells to fight against bacterial infections, Emory researchers have found. [More]
UTSA biologist recognized for showing leadership in advancing the discipline of reproductive biology

UTSA biologist recognized for showing leadership in advancing the discipline of reproductive biology

John McCarrey, professor of biology in the UTSA College of Sciences, has been selected to receive the Distinguished Service Award from the Society for the Study of Reproduction. [More]
Northwestern Medicine opens multidisciplinary treatment center for patients battling Huntington's disease

Northwestern Medicine opens multidisciplinary treatment center for patients battling Huntington's disease

Northwestern Medicine recently launched a multidisciplinary center dedicated to the comprehensive treatment of patients battling Huntington's disease. The new center will focus on both patient care and research of the inherited disease that causes the progressive breakdown of nerve cells in the brain. [More]

Research reveals stark variation in genetic tests for inherited eye disease in England

New research from The University of Manchester published in the Journal of Community Genetics reveals a stark variation in genetic testing services for inherited eye disease in England. [More]

Study shows stark variation in genetic testing services for inherited eye conditions in England

New research from The University of Manchester published in the Journal of Community Genetics reveals a stark variation in genetic testing services for inherited eye disease in England. [More]
Researchers report correlative links between family income, brain structure in children

Researchers report correlative links between family income, brain structure in children

Characterizing associations between socioeconomic factors and children's brain development, a team including investigators from nine universities across the country reports correlative links between family income and brain structure. Relationships between the brain and family income were strongest in the lowest end of the economic range - suggesting that interventional policies aimed at these children may have the largest societal impact. [More]
Minimally invasive laparoscopic surgery significantly lowers health care costs

Minimally invasive laparoscopic surgery significantly lowers health care costs

Adding to the clinical benefits and improved patient outcomes associated with minimally invasive surgery, Medtronic highlighted a study published in the March 25 online edition of JAMA Surgery. The new study demonstrated that patients who underwent laparoscopic colectomy procedures required fewer days of health care utilization and the health care system spent less on their acute and follow-up care than those who underwent traditional open surgery. [More]
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