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Genetics is the study of genes and heredity. Heredity is the passing of genetic information and traits (such as eye color and an increased chance of getting a certain disease) from parents to offspring.
Researchers find that nanopores in material MoS2 could sequence DNA more accurately

Researchers find that nanopores in material MoS2 could sequence DNA more accurately

Gene-based personalized medicine has many possibilities for diagnosis and targeted therapy, but one big bottleneck: the expensive and time-consuming DNA-sequencing process. [More]
Scientists identify gene that regulates sleep and wake rhythms

Scientists identify gene that regulates sleep and wake rhythms

Scientists at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies have identified a gene that regulates sleep and wake rhythms. [More]
Research: Oxidative stress predicts hip fracture in postmenopausal women

Research: Oxidative stress predicts hip fracture in postmenopausal women

Oxidative stress is a significant predictor for hip fracture in postmenopausal women, according to new research led by University of Cincinnati (UC) epidemiologists. [More]
Human genetics expert wins 2014 Basser Global Prize for BRCA-related research

Human genetics expert wins 2014 Basser Global Prize for BRCA-related research

Twenty years after the first identification of the BRCA1 gene, the University of Pennsylvania's Basser Research Center for BRCA will honor the geneticist credited with its founding with the second annual Basser Global Prize. [More]
New model provides insight into neurofunctional mechanisms of autism

New model provides insight into neurofunctional mechanisms of autism

An analysis of autism research covering genetics, brain imaging, and cognition led by Laurent Mottron of the University of Montreal has overhauled our understanding of why autism potentially occurs, develops and results in a diversity of symptoms. [More]
Blood expression levels of genes targeted by stress hormones could be biomarker for developing PTSD

Blood expression levels of genes targeted by stress hormones could be biomarker for developing PTSD

Blood expression levels of genes targeted by the stress hormones called glucocorticoids could be a physical measure, or biomarker, of risk for developing Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), according to a study conducted in rats by researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published August 11 in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS). [More]
Cardium announces review in Journal of Cardiovascular Pharmacology finds gene therapy for subset of heart disease patients ‘highly warranted’

Cardium announces review in Journal of Cardiovascular Pharmacology finds gene therapy for subset of heart disease patients ‘highly warranted’

Cardium Therapeutics, an operating unit of Taxus Cardium Pharmaceuticals Group Inc. (Trading Symbol: CRXM) has announced the publication of a review article in the Journal of Cardiovascular Pharmacology that concludes a gene therapy product promoting the growth of blood vessels is “highly warranted” to treat about 1 million U.S. heart-disease patients and 6 million more worldwide who are either ineligible or poor candidates for traditional angioplasty, stent placement or bypass surgery. [More]
Study suggests ways to treat cognitive deficits before psychiatric symptoms develop

Study suggests ways to treat cognitive deficits before psychiatric symptoms develop

Researchers at the University of Montreal and CHU Sainte-Justine Research Centre have traced the origins of ADHD, substance abuse and conduct disorder, and found that they develop from the same neurocognitive deficits, which in turn explains why they often occur together. [More]
23andMe, Pfizer partner to explore genetic factors associated with IBD

23andMe, Pfizer partner to explore genetic factors associated with IBD

23andMe, the leading personal genetics company today announced an agreement with Pfizer Inc. in which the companies will aim to enroll 10,000 people with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) in a research initiative designed to explore the genetic factors associated with the onset, progression, severity and response to treatments for IBD. [More]
Epigenetics has a large say in blood formation

Epigenetics has a large say in blood formation

Blood stem cells have the potential to turn into any type of blood cell, whether it be the oxygen-carrying red blood cells, or the many types of white blood cells of the immune system that help fight infection. [More]
Findings may lead to new tools in understanding human cognitive development, neuropsychiatric disorders

Findings may lead to new tools in understanding human cognitive development, neuropsychiatric disorders

How genes affect intelligence is complicated. Multiple genes, many yet unknown, are thought to interact among themselves and with environmental factors to influence the diverse abilities involved in intelligence. [More]
CAP awards accreditation to The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia Pathology & Laboratory Medicine

CAP awards accreditation to The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia Pathology & Laboratory Medicine

The Accreditation Committee of the College of American Pathologists (CAP) has awarded accreditation to The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia Pathology & Laboratory Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania based on results of a recent on-site inspection as part of the CAP's Accreditation Programs. [More]
New approach to knocking out parasite's genes

New approach to knocking out parasite's genes

Plasmodium falciparum, the parasite that causes malaria, has proven notoriously resistant to scientists' efforts to study its genetics. [More]
Schizophrenia-linked genetic variations and the developing brain: an interview with Prof. Guo-li Ming

Schizophrenia-linked genetic variations and the developing brain: an interview with Prof. Guo-li Ming

How much is currently known about what happens in the developing brain that puts people at risk of schizophrenia? [More]
GW researcher awarded grant to develop a model system to study PN infection

GW researcher awarded grant to develop a model system to study PN infection

According to a recent World Health Organization report of the leading causes of death worldwide, one-third of all deaths are due to infectious and parasitic diseases. There are currently no vaccines for parasitic nematode (PN), or worm infections in humans, and development of new drugs and vaccines will stall until researchers have a better understanding of PN biology. [More]
Articles describe barriers to, potential of greater adoption of complex care management

Articles describe barriers to, potential of greater adoption of complex care management

The care of patients with complex medical needs is widely regarded as one of the key factors driving increased U.S. health costs, and it is generally accepted that 10 to 15 percent of Medicare patients account for 65 to 75 percent of all Medicare spending. [More]
Researchers awarded $3.3 million NIH grant to study role of genetics in protecting against frailty

Researchers awarded $3.3 million NIH grant to study role of genetics in protecting against frailty

Frailty is a common condition associated with old age, characterized by weight loss, weakness, decreased activity level and reduced mobility, which together increase the risk of injury and death. Yet, not all elderly people become frail; some remain vigorous and robust well into old-age. [More]
Individuals with work related stress are at higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes

Individuals with work related stress are at higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes

Workplace stress can have a range of adverse effects on health with an increased risk of cardio-vascular diseases in the first line. [More]
Scientists solve key mystery in cancer research

Scientists solve key mystery in cancer research

A chance meeting between two leading UK and US scientists could have finally helped solve a key mystery in cancer research. [More]
Researchers find that animal's ability to endure internal parasite strongly influences reproductive success

Researchers find that animal's ability to endure internal parasite strongly influences reproductive success

In the first evidence that natural selection favors an individual's infection tolerance, researchers from Princeton University and the University of Edinburgh have found that an animal's ability to endure an internal parasite strongly influences its reproductive success. [More]