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Genetics is the study of genes and heredity. Heredity is the passing of genetic information and traits (such as eye color and an increased chance of getting a certain disease) from parents to offspring.
Endocrine Society selects 18 endocrinologists as winners of 2016 Laureate Awards

Endocrine Society selects 18 endocrinologists as winners of 2016 Laureate Awards

The Endocrine Society today announced it has chosen 18 accomplished endocrinologists as winners of the organization's prestigious 2016 Laureate Awards. [More]
New interactive tool helps researchers explore genetic underpinnings of cancer

New interactive tool helps researchers explore genetic underpinnings of cancer

Brown University computer scientists have developed a new interactive tool to help researchers and clinicians explore the genetic underpinnings of cancer. [More]
Amgen announces submission of supplemental New Drug Application to FDA for Kyprolis (carfilzomib)

Amgen announces submission of supplemental New Drug Application to FDA for Kyprolis (carfilzomib)

Amgen today announced the submission of a supplemental New Drug Application (sNDA) to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for Kyprolis (carfilzomib) for Injection to seek an expanded indication for the treatment of patients with a form of blood cancer, relapsed multiple myeloma, who have received at least one prior therapy. [More]
NeoGenomics' revenue increases 18% to $24.3 million in second quarter 2015

NeoGenomics' revenue increases 18% to $24.3 million in second quarter 2015

NeoGenomics, Inc., a leading provider of cancer-focused genetic testing services, today reported its results for the second quarter of 2015. [More]
Deep Genomics set to bring the power of deep learning technologies to genomics

Deep Genomics set to bring the power of deep learning technologies to genomics

Evolution has altered the human genome over hundreds of thousands of years -- and now humans can do it in a matter of months. [More]
Researchers discover experimental drug that treats hot flashes, other menopausal symptoms without side effects

Researchers discover experimental drug that treats hot flashes, other menopausal symptoms without side effects

Researchers have discovered an experimental medication that treats hot flashes and other menopausal symptoms without the life-threatening risks of hormone replacement therapy, according to a team led by a UNT Health Science Center scientist. [More]
Infants born with mutation in PLVAP gene develop severe protein losing enteropathy

Infants born with mutation in PLVAP gene develop severe protein losing enteropathy

Newborn children born with a mutation in the Plasmalemma Vesicle Associated Protein (PLVAP) gene develop severe protein losing enteropathy, according to a case study1 published in Cellular and Molecular Gastroenterology and Hepatology, the basic science journal of the American Gastroenterological Association. [More]
Genetic variation influences survival in patients with multiple myeloma

Genetic variation influences survival in patients with multiple myeloma

As part of a multi-institutional effort, researchers with Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah have found that multiple myeloma patients with a genetic variation in the gene FOPNL die on average 1-3 years sooner than patients without it. [More]
Study shows regions of genome underlying IBD consistent around the world

Study shows regions of genome underlying IBD consistent around the world

The first genetic study of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) to include individuals from diverse populations has shown that the regions of the genome underlying the disease are consistent around the world. This study, conducted under the auspices of the International IBD Genetics Consortium, included nearly 10,000 DNA samples from people of East Asian, Indian or Iranian descent and an existing set of 86,640 samples drawn from across Europe, North America and Oceania. [More]
New model helps to answer longstanding question in cancer science

New model helps to answer longstanding question in cancer science

A paper published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences argues against the commonly held "accumulation of mutations" model of oncogenesis in favor of a model that depends on evolutionary pressures acting on populations of cells. [More]
Study reveals potential new therapeutic target for depression treatment

Study reveals potential new therapeutic target for depression treatment

Increasing the levels of a signaling molecule found in the brain can positively alter response to stress, revealing a potential new therapeutic target for treatment of depression, UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers said. [More]
New genomic fingerprint may predict prostate cancer risk in African American men

New genomic fingerprint may predict prostate cancer risk in African American men

African American men are more likely to develop prostate cancer than European American men, and are also more than twice as likely to die from it. Although there are many reasons that contribute to this health disparity, new research shows that African American men may have a distinctly different type of prostate cancer than European American men, according to new genomic fingerprinting results. [More]
TGen, NAU to jointly develop quick, affordable and accurate test to diagnose Lyme disease

TGen, NAU to jointly develop quick, affordable and accurate test to diagnose Lyme disease

Focus On Lyme, an initiative sponsored by the Leadership Children's Foundation of Gilbert, Ariz., has donated $75,000 to the Translational Genomics Research Institute to support research into the development of a quick, affordable and accurate method of diagnosing Lyme disease. [More]
Duke study finds that gut worms can protect babies' brains from chronic inflammation

Duke study finds that gut worms can protect babies' brains from chronic inflammation

A Duke University study in rats finds that gut worms can protect babies' brains from long-term learning and memory problems caused by newborn infections. [More]
MD Anderson researchers find high prevalence of hereditary CRC among people diagnosed before the age of 35

MD Anderson researchers find high prevalence of hereditary CRC among people diagnosed before the age of 35

Hereditary colorectal cancers, caused by inherited gene mutations, are relatively rare for most patients. However, researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have discovered a particularly high prevalence of hereditary cancers among those diagnosed with the disease before the age of 35. They suggest that these patients should undergo genetic counseling to determine if their families may be at an elevated risk. [More]
Alzheimer's Association recognizes four scientists with Lifetime Achievement Awards at AAIC 2015

Alzheimer's Association recognizes four scientists with Lifetime Achievement Awards at AAIC 2015

The Alzheimer's Association recognizes four leading scientists for their contributions to advancing Alzheimer's disease and dementia research. The awards were presented during the opening session at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference 2015 in Washington, D.C. [More]
Study finds mechanism that identifies cause of intellectual disabilities in autism, Rett syndrome

Study finds mechanism that identifies cause of intellectual disabilities in autism, Rett syndrome

The term intellectual disability covers a large number of clinical entities, some with known cause and others of uncertain origin. For example Down syndrome is due to an extra copy of chromosome 21 and Rett syndrome is in part caused by a mutation in the control switch gene called MeCP2. [More]
Research: 'Pill on a string' could help detect early signs of oesophageal cancer

Research: 'Pill on a string' could help detect early signs of oesophageal cancer

A 'pill on a string' developed by researchers at the University of Cambridge could help doctors detect oesophageal cancer - cancer of the gullet - at an early stage, helping them overcome the problem of wide variation between biopsies, suggests research published today in the journal Nature Genetics. [More]
New approach holds great promise for developing effective treatments for human mitochondrial diseases

New approach holds great promise for developing effective treatments for human mitochondrial diseases

Using existing drugs, such as lithium, to restore basic biological processes in human cells and animal models, researchers may have broken a long-standing logjam in devising effective treatments for human mitochondrial diseases. [More]
Antibiotics may increase risk of juvenile arthritis

Antibiotics may increase risk of juvenile arthritis

Taking antibiotics may increase the risk that a child will develop juvenile arthritis, according to a study from Rutgers University, University of Pennsylvania and Nemours A.I. duPont Hospital for Children published today in Pediatrics. [More]
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