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Genetics is the study of genes and heredity. Heredity is the passing of genetic information and traits (such as eye color and an increased chance of getting a certain disease) from parents to offspring.
Study illustrates how domino effect of one genetic error can contribute to hydrocephalus

Study illustrates how domino effect of one genetic error can contribute to hydrocephalus

The mysterious condition once known as "water on the brain" became just a bit less murky this week thanks to a global research group led in part by a Case Western Reserve researcher. [More]
Doctor maps path of discovery for developing potential anticancer agent

Doctor maps path of discovery for developing potential anticancer agent

The journal Cancer Cell today published research led by Dr. Tak Mak mapping the path of discovery to developing a potential anticancer agent. [More]
Hour-long educational coaching session reduces re-admission odds, cost for Medicare patients

Hour-long educational coaching session reduces re-admission odds, cost for Medicare patients

A new study in Journal of General Internal Medicine reports that an hour-long educational coaching session and two or three follow-up phone calls after a hospital stay reduced re-admission odds by 39 percent among Medicare patients. [More]
Starvation can affect health of descendants of famished individuals

Starvation can affect health of descendants of famished individuals

Evidence from human famines and animal studies suggests that starvation can affect the health of descendants of famished individuals. But how such an acquired trait might be transmitted from one generation to the next has not been clear. [More]
Scientists find single gene that plays surprising role in manipulating aging

Scientists find single gene that plays surprising role in manipulating aging

It is something of an eternal question: Can we slow or even reverse the aging process? Even though genetic manipulations can, in fact, alter some cellular dynamics, little is known about the mechanisms of the aging process in living organisms. [More]
Salk scientists identify gene that fights metastasis of common lung cancer

Salk scientists identify gene that fights metastasis of common lung cancer

Scientists at the Salk Institute have identified a gene responsible for stopping the movement of cancer from the lungs to other parts of the body, indicating a new way to fight one of the world's deadliest cancers. [More]
UH Case Medical Center signs agreement with ARUP to offer DEEPGEN-HIV test

UH Case Medical Center signs agreement with ARUP to offer DEEPGEN-HIV test

University Hospitals (UH) Case Medical Center has signed an agreement with ARUP Laboratories, a major national clinical reference laboratory that offers an extensive menu of highly complex and unique medical tests to hospitals, medical schools, and other nonprofit and commercial organizations throughout the United States. [More]
Researcher finds genetic identifier that may allow clinicians to determine babies at risk for autism

Researcher finds genetic identifier that may allow clinicians to determine babies at risk for autism

A researcher at Seattle Children's Hospital and Research Institute has found a genetic identifier for autism that includes physical features that may eventually allow clinicians to identify babies who are at risk for autism before they are born. [More]
Researchers find link between genetic makeup and nation's happiness

Researchers find link between genetic makeup and nation's happiness

Genetics could be the key to explaining nation's levels of happiness, according to research from the University of Warwick. [More]
Deadly neurodegenerative disease treated in worms gives hope for humans

Deadly neurodegenerative disease treated in worms gives hope for humans

An untreatable and deadly neurodegenerative disease has been modelled and treated in worms by University of Liverpool researchers, suggesting a cure could be found for humans. [More]
Single injection of protein FGF1 enough to restore blood sugar levels

Single injection of protein FGF1 enough to restore blood sugar levels

In mice with diet-induced diabetes—the equivalent of type 2 diabetes in humans—a single injection of the protein FGF1 is enough to restore blood sugar levels to a healthy range for more than two days. [More]
Thirteen scientists receive grant to identify new treatments, cure for psoriasis

Thirteen scientists receive grant to identify new treatments, cure for psoriasis

Thirteen scientists received a total of $1.05 million in funding from the National Psoriasis Foundation for projects that aim to identify new treatments and a cure for psoriasis—an autoimmune disease that appears on the skin, affecting 7.5 million Americans—and psoriatic arthritis—an inflammatory arthritis that affects the joints and tendons, occurring in up to 30 percent of people with psoriasis. [More]
Study finds that friends who are not biologically related still resemble each other genetically

Study finds that friends who are not biologically related still resemble each other genetically

If you consider your friends family, you may be on to something. A study from the University of California, San Diego, and Yale University finds that friends who are not biologically related still resemble each other genetically. [More]
Researchers reveal molecular interplay between Roquin and RNA

Researchers reveal molecular interplay between Roquin and RNA

The Roquin protein, discovered in 2005, controls T-cell activation and differentiation by regulating the expression of certain mRNAs. In doing so, it helps to guarantee immunological tolerance and prevents immune responses against the body's own structures that can lead to autoimmune disease. [More]
Fatty acid transport proteins genetically linked to schizophrenia and ASD

Fatty acid transport proteins genetically linked to schizophrenia and ASD

Using diverse methodologies, neuroscientists from the RIKEN Brain Science Institute report that defects in Fatty Acid Binding Proteins (FABPs) may help to explain the pathology in some cases of schizophrenia and autism spectrum disorders. [More]
Mount Sinai awarded AHA grant to prevent heart disease among NYC children and parents

Mount Sinai awarded AHA grant to prevent heart disease among NYC children and parents

Mount Sinai Heart at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai has been awarded a $3.8 million grant by the American Heart Association to promote cardiovascular health among high-risk New York City children, and their parents, living in Harlem and the Bronx. With assistance from the NYC Administration for Children's Services, the research team's mission is to reduce each child's future risk of obesity, heart attack, stroke, and type 2 diabetes. [More]
Research reveals why HIV remains a long-lasting infection

Research reveals why HIV remains a long-lasting infection

HIV, the virus that causes AIDS, has the ability to integrate into the human genome, making it extremely difficult to cure the infection. A new study by scientists at Seattle Children's Research Institute, University of Washington and Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center found that when HIV integrates into genes involved with cancer, these cells tend to reproduce to a greater extent than others HIV-infected cells. [More]
Cryptococcus gattii evolves as it spreads to temperate climates

Cryptococcus gattii evolves as it spreads to temperate climates

Cryptococcus gattii, a virulent fungus that has invaded the Pacific Northwest is highly adaptive and warrants global "public health vigilance," according to a study by an international team led by the Translational Genomics Research Institute. [More]
New avenues for treatment of Alzheimer's disease

New avenues for treatment of Alzheimer's disease

Judes Poirier, PhD, C.Q., from the Douglas Mental Health Institute and McGill University in Montr-al (Canada) and his team have discovered that a relatively frequent genetic variant actually conveys significant protection against the common form of Alzheimer's disease and can delay the onset of the disease by as much as 4 years. [More]

85% of African American adults expressed interest in genetic testing for AD susceptibility

Alcohol dependence (AD) has a genetic component and testing can determine a person's genetic risk for susceptibility to AD. [More]