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While there are many causes of glaucoma, most cases are associated with increased intraocular pressure. Loss of vision is usually characterized by a gradual reduction in peripheral vision, which can lead to a tunnel vision effect. Glaucoma affects approximately 100 million people globally and is one of the leading causes of blindness in the world today. An estimated three million Americans have this sight-threatening disease. Because it is painless and advances gradually, many people who have glaucoma or elevated IOP have not been diagnosed. If detected and treated early, vision can usually be preserved.
Shire announces resubmission of lifitegrast NDA to FDA for treatment of dry eye disease in adults

Shire announces resubmission of lifitegrast NDA to FDA for treatment of dry eye disease in adults

Shire plc today announced it has resubmitted the New Drug Application (NDA) to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for its investigational candidate, lifitegrast, for the treatment of signs and symptoms of dry eye disease in adults. Shire resubmitted the NDA in response to the complete response letter (CRL) the company received from the FDA on October 16, 2015. [More]
Incidence of childhood myopia has more than doubled over last 50 years among American children

Incidence of childhood myopia has more than doubled over last 50 years among American children

The largest study of childhood eye diseases ever undertaken in the U.S. confirms that the incidence of childhood myopia among American children has more than doubled over the last 50 years. The findings echo a troubling trend among adults and children in Asia, where 90 percent or more of the population have been diagnosed with myopia, up from 10 to 20 percent 60 years ago. [More]
Age-related macular degeneration: an interview with Cathy Yelf, Macular Society

Age-related macular degeneration: an interview with Cathy Yelf, Macular Society

Age-related macular degeneration is a condition of the macula, a tiny area of the retina at the back of the eye. Your macula is only about the size of the grain of rice, that’s about four millimeters across. [More]
Three new genetic associations identified for primary open angle glaucoma

Three new genetic associations identified for primary open angle glaucoma

Researchers from Massachusetts Eye and Ear/Harvard Medical School and Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine have led an international effort to identify three genetic associations that influence susceptibility to primary open angle glaucoma -- the most common form of adult onset glaucoma and the leading cause of irreversible blindness in the world. [More]
NIH-funded analysis identifies three genes that contribute to most common form of glaucoma

NIH-funded analysis identifies three genes that contribute to most common form of glaucoma

An analysis funded by the National Eye Institute (NEI), part of the National Institutes of Health, has identified three genes that contribute to the most common type of glaucoma. The study increases the total number of such genes to 15. [More]
Head-down yoga positions fatal for glaucoma patients

Head-down yoga positions fatal for glaucoma patients

Glaucoma patients may experience increased eye pressure as the result of performing several different head-down positions while practicing yoga, according to a new study published by researchers at New York Eye and Ear Infirmary of Mount Sinai in the journal PLOS ONE. [More]
Novoron Bioscience receives NIH grant to study novel therapeutic approach for multiple sclerosis

Novoron Bioscience receives NIH grant to study novel therapeutic approach for multiple sclerosis

Novoron Bioscience, Inc., a private biotech company dedicated to developing new therapeutics for disorders of the central nervous system, today announced that the company has been awarded a National Institutes of Health grant under the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program. [More]
Bio Light's IOPtiMate system approved in Canada for treatment of glaucoma

Bio Light's IOPtiMate system approved in Canada for treatment of glaucoma

Bio Light Israeli Life Sciences Investments Ltd., an emerging global ophthalmic company focused on the discovery, development and commercialization of products and product candidates which address ophthalmic conditions, announced today that its IOPtiMate system for the treatment of glaucoma has been approved by the Canadian Medical Devices Bureau, allowing the Company to commercialize the surgical system in Canada. [More]
BioLight announces first sale of IOPtiMate system in Portugal

BioLight announces first sale of IOPtiMate system in Portugal

BioLight Life Sciences Investments Ltd., a firm that invests in, manages and commercializes biomedical innovations in ophthalmology and cancer diagnostics, today announced the first sale of the IOPtiMate system to a medical center located in Portugal. [More]
Dompé’s investigational biotech molecule receives orphan drug designation for treatment of neurotrophic keratitis

Dompé’s investigational biotech molecule receives orphan drug designation for treatment of neurotrophic keratitis

The Dompé biopharmaceutical company announced today that the Committee for Orphan Medicinal Products of the European Medicines Agency (EMA) has officially designated recombinant human Nerve Growth Factor (rhNGF) - the investigational biotech molecule developed by Dompé based on research by Nobel Laureate Rita Levi Montalcini - as an orphan drug for the treatment of neurotrophic keratitis. [More]

OphthaliX completes patient enrollment in CF101 Phase II trial for treatment of glaucoma

OphthaliX Inc., a clinical-stage company focused on developing therapeutic products for the treatment of ophthalmic disorders and a subsidiary of Can-Fite BioPharma Ltd., announced today that it has completed patient enrollment for its Phase II trial of CF101 in the treatment of glaucoma. [More]
Johns Hopkins researchers develop method to turn stem cells into retinal ganglion cells

Johns Hopkins researchers develop method to turn stem cells into retinal ganglion cells

Johns Hopkins researchers have developed a method to efficiently turn human stem cells into retinal ganglion cells, the type of nerve cells located within the retina that transmit visual signals from the eye to the brain. Death and dysfunction of these cells cause vision loss in conditions like glaucoma and multiple sclerosis. [More]
Can-Fite BioPharma reports financial results, provides updates on drug development programs

Can-Fite BioPharma reports financial results, provides updates on drug development programs

Can-Fite BioPharma Ltd., a biotechnology company with a pipeline of proprietary small molecule drugs being developed to treat inflammatory diseases, cancer and sexual dysfunction, today reported financial results for the nine months ended September 30, 2015 and updates on its drug development programs. [More]
BioLight signs joint financing agreement with two Asia-based venture capital firms

BioLight signs joint financing agreement with two Asia-based venture capital firms

BioLight Life Sciences Investments, a company focused primarily on the discovery, development and commercialization of breakthrough ophthalmic diagnostics and therapeutics, announced today that it has entered into a joint financing agreement (the "Agreement") with two Asia-based venture capital firms (the "New Investors"), pursuant to which BioLight and the New Investors will make a direct equity investment in BioLight's IOPtima Ltd. subsidiary via a private placement. [More]
Impax's NUMIENT granted EC marketing authorization for symptomatic treatment of adult patients with Parkinson's disease

Impax's NUMIENT granted EC marketing authorization for symptomatic treatment of adult patients with Parkinson's disease

Impax Laboratories, Inc. today announced that the European Commission has granted marketing authorization for NUMIENT (Levodopa and Carbidopa), a modified-release oral capsule formulation for the symptomatic treatment of adult patients with Parkinson's disease. [More]
Researchers find ranibizumab drug as effective alternative to laser therapy for treating diabetic retinopathy

Researchers find ranibizumab drug as effective alternative to laser therapy for treating diabetic retinopathy

In a randomized clinical trial of more than 300 participants, researchers from Johns Hopkins and elsewhere have found that ranibizumab — a drug most commonly used to treat retinal swelling in people with diabetes — is an effective alternative to laser therapy for treating the most severe, potentially blinding form of diabetic retinal disease. Results of the government-sponsored study also show that the drug therapy carries fewer side effects than the currently used laser treatment. [More]
AAO recognizes outstanding eye physicians and surgeons for innovation in patient care

AAO recognizes outstanding eye physicians and surgeons for innovation in patient care

The American Academy of Ophthalmology will pay tribute to outstanding eye physicians and surgeons who have made significant achievements in various areas of the profession. These range from scientific innovation and humanitarian service to education and advocacy. The honorees will be recognized AAO 2015, the Academy's 119th annual meeting in Las Vegas. [More]
Drug used to treat Parkinson's and related diseases may delay or prevent macular degeneration

Drug used to treat Parkinson's and related diseases may delay or prevent macular degeneration

In a major scientific breakthrough, a drug used to treat Parkinson's and related diseases may be able to delay or prevent macular degeneration, the most common form of blindness among older Americans. [More]
Charles Bonnet syndrome: an interview with Dr. Dominic ffytche

Charles Bonnet syndrome: an interview with Dr. Dominic ffytche

Charles Bonnet syndrome is the name we give to the visual hallucinations associated with eye disease. There are lots of different causes of visual hallucinations. Many different medical problems and medications can cause them, but, when the cause is eye disease, it's referred to as Charles Bonnet Syndrome after Charles Bonnet, who was a natural philosopher in the 18th century. [More]
Saint Louis University ophthalmologist offers tips to manage night vision issues

Saint Louis University ophthalmologist offers tips to manage night vision issues

Owls and cats are at an advantage as the days get darker, but humans may notice their vision takes a hit during their evening commute home as daylight hours shrink. [More]
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