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Acquired immune deficiency syndrome or acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a disease of the human immune system caused by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).

This condition progressively reduces the effectiveness of the immune system and leaves individuals susceptible to opportunistic infections and tumors. HIV is transmitted through direct contact of a mucous membrane or the bloodstream with a bodily fluid containing HIV, such as blood, semen, vaginal fluid, preseminal fluid, and breast milk.
Study examines links between spending on social services and AIDS deaths in U.S.

Study examines links between spending on social services and AIDS deaths in U.S.

Despite considerable advances in the prevention and treatment of HIV/AIDS over the past 30 years, HIV infection rates have remained stagnant in the United States for the past decade. A study by researchers at the Yale Global Health Leadership Institute examines links between spending on social services and public health and AIDS deaths in the United States. [More]
Cistus extracts attack HIV and Ebola viruses

Cistus extracts attack HIV and Ebola viruses

Scientists at the Helmholtz Zentrum München discover that extracts of the medicinal plant Cistus incanus (Ci) prevent human immunodeficiency viruses from infecting cells. Active antiviral ingredients in the extracts inhibit docking of viral proteins to cells. Antiviral activity of Cistus extracts also targets Ebola- and Marburg viruses. [More]
Study provides new insights into breast cancer metastasis

Study provides new insights into breast cancer metastasis

It has long been thought that cancer metastasizes, or spreads, when a single cancer cell escapes from the original tumor, travels through the bloodstream and sets up shop in distant organs. However, a growing body of evidence suggests that these bad actors don't travel alone; instead they migrate through the body in cellular clusters, like gangs. [More]
Using centrifugal elutriation and flow cytometry to answer biological questions: an interview with Peter Lopez

Using centrifugal elutriation and flow cytometry to answer biological questions: an interview with Peter Lopez

Flow Cytometry, the measurement of various cellular characteristics as they flow through a measuring apparatus, has so many applications that it's hard to know where to begin. [More]
Text message reminders may help reduce people’s blood pressure

Text message reminders may help reduce people’s blood pressure

The study, of over 1300 adults with high blood pressure in the Cape Town area, compared text message reminders and interactive text messaging to a control group receiving standard care. The results appear online in the American Heart Association journal Circulation. [More]
Profectus begins Phase 1 clinical study of VesiculoVax-vectored Ebola virus vaccine

Profectus begins Phase 1 clinical study of VesiculoVax-vectored Ebola virus vaccine

Profectus BioSciences, Inc., a clinical-stage vaccine company developing novel vaccines for the prevention and treatment of infectious diseases and the treatment of cancer, announced today the initiation of a Phase 1 clinical study of Profectus' VesiculoVax-vectored Ebola virus vaccine. [More]
Mylan releases generic version of Felbatol Tablets in U.S.

Mylan releases generic version of Felbatol Tablets in U.S.

Mylan N.V. today announced the U.S. launch of Felbamate Tablets USP, 400 mg and 600 mg, which is the generic version of Meda Pharms' Felbatol Tablets. Mylan received final approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for its Abbreviated New Drug Application (ANDA) for this product. [More]
Sedentary behavior associated with poor cardiovascular health, diabetes in people with severe obesity

Sedentary behavior associated with poor cardiovascular health, diabetes in people with severe obesity

Sedentary behavior is associated with poor cardiovascular health and diabetes in adults with severe obesity, independent of how much exercise they perform, a University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health-led study showed for the first time. [More]
Researchers use quick screening method to identify, test promising anti-Ebola drugs

Researchers use quick screening method to identify, test promising anti-Ebola drugs

A quick screening method has been used for the first time in a standard open laboratory to identify and test promising anti-Ebola drugs. This approach increases the possibility of finding new therapies faster. [More]

Modeling research shows adding a vaccine to HIV/AIDS response necessary to conclusively end the epidemic

Adding a vaccine to the comprehensive HIV/AIDS response is essential to conclusively ending the epidemic, according to modeling research published today. [More]
Nearly 7 in 10 middle and high school students exposed to e-cigarette ads

Nearly 7 in 10 middle and high school students exposed to e-cigarette ads

About 7 in 10 middle and high school students – more than 18 million young people – see e-cigarette advertising in stores, online, in newspapers and magazines, or on television and in movies, according to a new CDC Vital Signs report. [More]
Mylan announces U.S. launch of generic Ortho Tri-Cyclen Lo Tablets

Mylan announces U.S. launch of generic Ortho Tri-Cyclen Lo Tablets

Mylan N.V. today announced the U.S. launch of Norgestimate and Ethinyl Estradiol Tablets USP, 0.18 mg/0.025 mg, 0.215 mg/0.025 mg, and 0.25 mg/0.025 mg, which is the generic version of Janssen's Ortho Tri-Cyclen Lo Tablets. [More]

Mylan announces launch of Linezolid Tablets, 600 mg in U.S.

Mylan N.V. today announced the U.S. launch of Linezolid Tablets, 600 mg, which is the generic version of Pfizer's Zyvox Tablets. Mylan received final approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for its Abbreviated New Drug Application (ANDA) for this product, which is indicated in adults and children for the treatment of certain infections caused by susceptible Gram-positive bacteria. [More]
Medication poisoning threatens young children in poor areas

Medication poisoning threatens young children in poor areas

Children younger than 5 who live in economically disadvantaged areas had a greater risk of medication poisoning that resulted in referral to a health care facility, according to scientists at the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health and the University of California, San Diego. These areas were rural and experienced high unemployment, along with lower rates of high school graduation and lower household income. [More]
New footage shows how AIDS vaccine candidate recruits immune cells to destroy infected cells

New footage shows how AIDS vaccine candidate recruits immune cells to destroy infected cells

Using innovative technology, scientists from the Institut Pasteur and Inserm have filmed in vivo the process by which an AIDS vaccine candidate, developed by the French Vaccine Research Institute and the ANRS, triggers the immune response. [More]
ATS commends President Obama for release of National Action Plan to combat TB

ATS commends President Obama for release of National Action Plan to combat TB

The American Thoracic Society applauds President Barack Obama and the Administration for the release of the National Action Plan to Combat Drug Resistant Tuberculosis (TB) today. [More]
Candidiasis needs to be treated early, aggressively to help vulnerable hospitalized patients

Candidiasis needs to be treated early, aggressively to help vulnerable hospitalized patients

One of the most common causes of healthcare-associated infections, candidiasis is a serious, life-threatening fungal infection that needs to be treated early, aggressively and appropriately, note updated guidelines released by the Infectious Diseases Society of America and published in the journal Clinical Infectious Diseases. [More]
Study offers new view of how cancer cells transform normal cells through 'metastatic hijacking'

Study offers new view of how cancer cells transform normal cells through 'metastatic hijacking'

Metastasis - or the spread of cancer from one part of the body to other parts - accounts for more than 90 percent of cancer-related deaths. Although the cells that seed metastasis and the sites that they tend to travel to have been increasingly studied over the years, little has been known about how cancer migrates from a primary site, such as breast tissue, to a secondary site, such as the brain or bone marrow. [More]
TSRI scientists track how HIV-fighting antibodies develop over time

TSRI scientists track how HIV-fighting antibodies develop over time

In a new study, a team led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute tracked how a family of these HIV-fighting antibodies develops over time. The research shows how a future vaccine might trigger the immune system to produce these antibodies more effectively. [More]
Shingles vaccine can help protect elderly patients with end-stage renal disease

Shingles vaccine can help protect elderly patients with end-stage renal disease

Elderly patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) who received the shingles vaccine were half as likely to develop shingles compared to those who were not vaccinated. The new study from Kaiser Permanente, published in Clinical Infectious Diseases, also found the best protection against shingles was achieved when patients received the vaccination shortly after beginning dialysis. [More]
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