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Scientists find novel way for earlier detection of deadly Merkel cell carcinoma

Scientists find novel way for earlier detection of deadly Merkel cell carcinoma

Scientists have found a way to detect earlier if a deadly cancer, Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC), is recurring in patients, according to a paper to be published 11 a.m. Eastern time, Dec. 7, in the journal Cancer. [More]
Experimental T-cell therapy shows promise in preventing AML relapse

Experimental T-cell therapy shows promise in preventing AML relapse

Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center announced promising results from an early trial in which patients with high-risk acute myeloid leukemia received genetically engineered immune cells. [More]
Project to help those living with HIV launched by Beckman Coulter

Project to help those living with HIV launched by Beckman Coulter

Beckman Coulter Life Sciences is launching an international HIV/AIDS award at the 2016 conference for the African Society for Laboratory Medicine (ASLM) being held in Cape Town, South Africa (December 3 to 8). [More]
Researcher to study ethical complexities of involving teens at high risk for HIV in prevention trials

Researcher to study ethical complexities of involving teens at high risk for HIV in prevention trials

An Indiana University nursing researcher has been awarded $1.1 million to study the ethical complexities of involving adolescents ages 14-17 at high risk for HIV in biomedical prevention trials. [More]
Study finds 1 in 5 pediatric celiac disease patients on gluten-free diet sustain persistent intestinal damage

Study finds 1 in 5 pediatric celiac disease patients on gluten-free diet sustain persistent intestinal damage

In surprising findings, researchers from MassGeneral Hospital for Children and Boston Children's Hospital have discovered that nearly one in five children with celiac disease sustained persistent intestinal damage, despite strict adherence to a gluten-free diet. [More]
FIRS calls on governments, health organizations to strengthen response to HIV on World AIDS Day

FIRS calls on governments, health organizations to strengthen response to HIV on World AIDS Day

In recognition of World AIDS Day, held annually on Dec. 1 each year since 1988, the Forum of International Respiratory Societies (FIRS) is calling on governments, health advocates and non-government organizations to strengthen their response to HIV/AIDS. In 2015 AIDS claimed 1.1 million lives. [More]
ECDC: 1 in 7 HIV-infected people in the EU/EEA unaware of disease status

ECDC: 1 in 7 HIV-infected people in the EU/EEA unaware of disease status

With 29 747 newly reported HIV infections in 2015, the EU/EEA notification rate is similar to recent years with an overall insignificant change from 6.6 per 100 000 population in 2006 to 6.3 in 2015 (adjusted for reporting delay). [More]
MGH researchers develop new methods for mapping and measuring solid stress in tumors

MGH researchers develop new methods for mapping and measuring solid stress in tumors

Massachusetts General Hospital investigators have developed new methods for mapping and measuring solid stress - the force exerted by solid and elastic components - within tumors, an accomplishment that may lead to improved understanding of those forces and their consequences and to novel treatment strategies. [More]
MGH researchers uncover mechanism revealing why aspartame may not promote weight loss

MGH researchers uncover mechanism revealing why aspartame may not promote weight loss

A team of Massachusetts General Hospital investigators has found a possible mechanism explaining why use of the sugar substitute aspartame might not promote weight loss. [More]

Scientists develop new model to help eliminate HIV vulnerability among racial/ethnic groups

Although HIV rates are higher among the African American community compared to the White population, research shows that engagement in risky behaviors does not fully account for these differences. [More]
GW researchers awarded $2.2 million NCI grant to study role of HERVs in cancer

GW researchers awarded $2.2 million NCI grant to study role of HERVs in cancer

George Washington University researchers received a $2.2 million grant from the National Cancer Institute to uncover why certain cancer types increase whereas others are unchanged or even decrease in those with HIV infection. [More]
Eminent physician Kenneth Walker receives Georgia Hospital Heroes Lifetime Achievement Award

Eminent physician Kenneth Walker receives Georgia Hospital Heroes Lifetime Achievement Award

Grady Health System Assistant Chief of Internal Medicine and Emory University School of Medicine Professor H. Kenneth Walker, M.D., was awarded the prestigious Georgia Hospital Heroes Lifetime Achievement Award at the Georgia Hospital Association's (GHA) Annual Meeting on Nov. 11. [More]
Testing ability to recognize, remember odors may help identify people at risk for Alzheimer's disease

Testing ability to recognize, remember odors may help identify people at risk for Alzheimer's disease

A non-invasive protocol testing the ability to recognize, remember and distinguish between odors was able to identify older individuals who - according to genetic, imaging and more detailed memory tests - were at increased risk of Alzheimer's disease. [More]
Leishmaniasis infection rates increase among ecotourists, soldiers in the U.S.

Leishmaniasis infection rates increase among ecotourists, soldiers in the U.S.

Driven by burgeoning ecotourism and military campaigns in Iraq and Afghanistan, a parasitic infection called leishmaniasis is showing up in more U.S. patients, often stumping doctors. [More]
CannaCure Florida offers medical cannabis educational conference following legalization of marijuana

CannaCure Florida offers medical cannabis educational conference following legalization of marijuana

CannaCure Florida is proudly offering the most comprehensive medical cannabis educational conference following passage of Florida Amendment 2 legalizing medical marijuana. [More]
MGH researchers find following healthy lifestyle can mitigate genetic risk of heart disease

MGH researchers find following healthy lifestyle can mitigate genetic risk of heart disease

It is well known that following a healthy lifestyle -- not smoking, avoiding excess weight and getting regular exercise - can reduce the risk of heart disease. [More]
Fred Hutchinson opens first-of-its-kind clinic to provide new immunotherapies for cancer patients

Fred Hutchinson opens first-of-its-kind clinic to provide new immunotherapies for cancer patients

Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center today announced the official opening of a first-of-its-kind clinic dedicated to providing innovative immunotherapies for cancer patients in clinical trials. [More]
Americans take obesity as seriously as cancer, new survey finds

Americans take obesity as seriously as cancer, new survey finds

Americans take obesity as seriously as cancer, and say it's an even bigger health threat than heart disease, the nation's leading killer, yet most do not go beyond traditional diets or involve doctors in their largely unsuccessful personal struggles against the disease, according to a new survey by the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery and the independent research organization, NORC at the University of Chicago. [More]
Study reveals way to actively reverse anesthetic-induced unconsciousness

Study reveals way to actively reverse anesthetic-induced unconsciousness

The latest study from a Massachusetts General Hospital/Massachusetts Institute of Technology team investigating the mechanisms underlying general anesthesia finds that stimulating a specific group of neurons in mice produces signs of arousal -- including getting on their feet and walking -- even as the animals continue to receive the anesthetic drug isoflurane. [More]
Novel approach to analyzing brain structures may help predict progression of Alzheimer's disease

Novel approach to analyzing brain structures may help predict progression of Alzheimer's disease

Use of a novel approach to analyzing brain structure that focuses on the shape rather than the size of particular features may allow identification of individuals in early presymptomatic stages of Alzheimer's disease. [More]
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