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Penn Center for Global Health honors Ernest Madu with inaugural Global Health Champion award

Penn Center for Global Health honors Ernest Madu with inaugural Global Health Champion award

The Center for Global Health in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania is pleased to honor Ernest Madu, MD, chairman and CEO of the Heart Institute of the Caribbean with its first annual Global Health Champion Award. [More]
Crick researchers find promising target for new tuberculosis drugs

Crick researchers find promising target for new tuberculosis drugs

Scientists led by Dr Luiz Pedro Carvalho at the Francis Crick Institute in London have found a promising new target in the search for new tuberculosis drugs. In the process, they say they've proven the strengths of a new research technique called metabolomics. [More]
Researchers develop innovative technique for detecting HIV hiding places in infected patients

Researchers develop innovative technique for detecting HIV hiding places in infected patients

Discovery of a novel, advanced technique to identify the rare cells where human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) hides in patients taking antiretroviral therapy (ART). This is an important step forward in the search for a HIV/AIDS cure. [More]
Americans believe cancer to be major health care challenge, Mayo Clinic survey reveals

Americans believe cancer to be major health care challenge, Mayo Clinic survey reveals

While Zika remains a hot topic in the news, a new survey by Mayo Clinic reveals that Americans believe the country's most significant health care challenge is cancer. [More]
Study shows holes in HIV's protective glycan shield could be vital in designing vaccine candidates

Study shows holes in HIV's protective glycan shield could be vital in designing vaccine candidates

A new study from scientists at The Scripps Research Institute shows that "holes" in HIV's defensive sugar shield could be important in designing an HIV vaccine. [More]
TSRI, IAVI scientists reveal new reductionist vaccine strategy to fight against HIV

TSRI, IAVI scientists reveal new reductionist vaccine strategy to fight against HIV

A series of new studies led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute and the International AIDS Vaccine Initiative describe a potential vaccination strategy to jump-start the selection and evolution of broadly effective antibodies to prevent HIV infection. [More]
International researchers discover 44 novel gene sites linked to hypertension

International researchers discover 44 novel gene sites linked to hypertension

In papers receiving advance online publication in Nature Genetics, two international multi-institutional research teams describe identifying a total of 44 novel gene sites associated with hypertension or high blood pressure. [More]
Virginia Mason offers totally laparoscopic advanced surgery for removing tumors from pancreas

Virginia Mason offers totally laparoscopic advanced surgery for removing tumors from pancreas

Virginia Mason now offers the totally laparoscopic Whipple procedure as an advanced surgical option for removing tumors from the head of the pancreas. [More]
Right dose of CAR T cells and lymphodepletion can achieve good response rates for NHL patients

Right dose of CAR T cells and lymphodepletion can achieve good response rates for NHL patients

In a paper published today in Science Translational Medicine, researchers from Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center shared data from an early-phase study of patients with advanced non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) who received JCAR014, a Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) T cell treatment, and chemotherapy. [More]
Study finds cord blood transplant recipients appear to have better outcomes against leukemia

Study finds cord blood transplant recipients appear to have better outcomes against leukemia

Umbilical cord blood transplants may have advantages beyond offering an alternative stem cell source for leukemia patients without a traditional donor match, according to a study published today in The New England Journal of Medicine. [More]
Research supports potential role for cognitive activity in prevention of Alzheimer's disease

Research supports potential role for cognitive activity in prevention of Alzheimer's disease

Are there any ways of preventing or delaying the development of Alzheimer's disease or other forms of age-associated dementia? While several previously published studies have suggested a protective effect for cognitive activities such as reading, playing games or attending cultural events, questions have been raised about whether these studies reveal a real cause-and-effect relationship or if the associations could result from unmeasured factors. [More]
European scientists invent new microscope for rapid detection of deadly infections

European scientists invent new microscope for rapid detection of deadly infections

A group of European scientists have invented a microscope that will allow the fastest ever detection of life-threatening infections caused by bacteria, such as E. coli or Staphylococcus, and conditions such as Meningitis, saving millions of lives every year. [More]
Research reveals people in Sub-Saharan Africa satisfied with their sex lives

Research reveals people in Sub-Saharan Africa satisfied with their sex lives

People in Africa's Sub-Sahara region, a relatively undeveloped area, are generally satisfied with their sex lives, with the most common rating -- reported by 18 percent of survey respondents -- being a perfect "10," according to Baylor University research to be presented Monday, Aug. 22, at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association in Seattle. [More]
KU partners with Peace Corps to offer web-based tools to volunteers working in Africa to boost health

KU partners with Peace Corps to offer web-based tools to volunteers working in Africa to boost health

The University of Kansas is partnering with the Peace Corps to provide custom, web-based resources to staff and volunteers in Africa who are working to boost health and development. [More]
Stem cells derived from bone marrow provide better quality of life to transplant patients

Stem cells derived from bone marrow provide better quality of life to transplant patients

A large, nationwide study published in the journal JAMA Oncology found that people who received transplants of cells collected from a donor's bone marrow the original source for blood stem cell transplants, developed decades ago had better self-reported psychological well-being, experienced fewer symptoms of a common post-transplant side effect called graft-vs.-host disease and were more likely to be back at work five years after transplantation than those whose transplanted cells were taken from the donor's bloodstream. [More]
MGH investigators discover key molecules essential for sensing proteasome dysfunction

MGH investigators discover key molecules essential for sensing proteasome dysfunction

Maintaining appropriate levels of proteins within cells largely relies on a cellular component called the proteasome, which degrades unneeded or defective proteins to recycle the components for the eventual assembly of new proteins. [More]
Scientists identify potential mechanism that paves way for improved treatment of fungal infections

Scientists identify potential mechanism that paves way for improved treatment of fungal infections

By identifying new compounds that selectively block mitochondrial respiration in pathogenic fungi, Whitehead Institute scientists have identified a potential antifungal mechanism that could enable combination therapy with fluconazole, one of today's most commonly prescribed fungal infection treatments. [More]

Peer outreach improves diagnosis and treatment of HIV among sex workers

Sex workers were more likely to regularly visit health clinics for testing and treatment of HIV, AIDS and other sexually transmitted infections after being approached by a peer outreach worker, according to research from the University of Houston. [More]
Novel PET radiotracer reveals epigenetic activity in the human brain for the first time

Novel PET radiotracer reveals epigenetic activity in the human brain for the first time

A novel PET radiotracer developed at the Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging at Massachusetts General Hospital is able for the first time to reveal epigenetic activity - the process that determines whether or not genes are expressed - within the human brain. [More]
Coordinated treatment for both illnesses could save lives of people with HIV and TB

Coordinated treatment for both illnesses could save lives of people with HIV and TB

Tuberculosis (TB) is a leading killer of people with HIV, and providing therapy for both illnesses simultaneously saves lives - according to new guidelines on the treatment of drug-susceptible TB developed jointly by the American Thoracic Society, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and Infectious Diseases Society of America. [More]
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