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American Cancer Society, World Lung Foundation unveil ‘The Tobacco Atlas, Fifth Edition’

American Cancer Society, World Lung Foundation unveil ‘The Tobacco Atlas, Fifth Edition’

The Tobacco Atlas, Fifth Edition ("The Atlas"), and its companion mobile app and website TobaccoAtlas.org, were unveiled today by the American Cancer Society and World Lung Foundation at the 16th World Conference on Tobacco or Health. [More]
Selten Pharma's SPI-026 granted FDA Orphan Drug Designation for treatment of PAH

Selten Pharma's SPI-026 granted FDA Orphan Drug Designation for treatment of PAH

Selten Pharma, Inc., a privatively held biopharmaceutical company focused on the development and commercialization of therapies for the treatment of rare diseases, announced today that its lead compound tacrolimus (SPI-026) has been granted Orphan Drug Designation by the U.S. Food & Drug Administration for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). [More]
Finding could improve global efforts to prevent HIV transmission, save lives

Finding could improve global efforts to prevent HIV transmission, save lives

People who recently have been infected with HIV may not be as highly infectious as previously believed, a finding that could improve global efforts to prevent HIV transmission and save lives. In particular, the finding bolsters the strategy of treating patients with antiretroviral drugs before the onset of AIDS to prevent transmission. [More]
Medical experts aim to offer lifesaving treatments to eliminate preventable deaths from AKI by 2025

Medical experts aim to offer lifesaving treatments to eliminate preventable deaths from AKI by 2025

Preventable deaths caused by acute kidney injury (AKI) could be nearly eliminated in just 10 years, according to leading medical experts. This often forgotten condition - which affects around 13 million people every year and contributes to 1.7 million deaths annually - is preventable and can be treated for as little as $US150 per patient. [More]
Comprehensive review of sex hormones' role in female reproductive tract

Comprehensive review of sex hormones' role in female reproductive tract

Charles R. Wira, PhD, and colleagues at Dartmouth's Geisel School of Medicine have presented a comprehensive review of the role of sex hormones in the geography of the female reproductive tract and evidence supporting a "window of vulnerability" to HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs). [More]
Study: Countries most affected by Ebola outbreak may soon have 100,000 more measles cases

Study: Countries most affected by Ebola outbreak may soon have 100,000 more measles cases

An international study involving the University of Southampton suggests there could be a rise in measles cases of 100,000 across the three countries most affected by the Ebola outbreak in West Africa due to health system disruptions. [More]
Common herpes drug Valacyclovir decreases HIV-1 levels

Common herpes drug Valacyclovir decreases HIV-1 levels

Case Western Reserve researchers are part of an international team that has discovered that a common herpes drug reduces HIV-1 levels — even when patients do not have herpes. [More]
MGH study suggests that bariatric surgery can reduce risk of asthma attacks

MGH study suggests that bariatric surgery can reduce risk of asthma attacks

A study led by Massachusetts General Hospital investigators suggests that bariatric surgery can significantly reduce the risk of asthma attacks - also called exacerbations - in obese patients with asthma. [More]
GHTC report confronts key challenge of renewing US leadership in global health technology

GHTC report confronts key challenge of renewing US leadership in global health technology

​Today, the world is looking to the United States for cutting-edge diagnostics, drugs, and vaccines that could have the last word on an Ebola outbreak that is down but not out. But those innovations are the product of past US investments in research and development (R&D). [More]
Ebola crisis increases susceptibility to measles, other vaccine-preventable illnesses

Ebola crisis increases susceptibility to measles, other vaccine-preventable illnesses

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health researchers say that major disruptions in the health care systems in West Africa caused by the Ebola crisis have led to significant decreases in vaccinations for childhood diseases, increasing susceptibility to measles and other vaccine-preventable illnesses. [More]
Penn researcher named a recipient of 2015 Paul Ehrlich and Ludwig Darmstaedter Prize

Penn researcher named a recipient of 2015 Paul Ehrlich and Ludwig Darmstaedter Prize

University of Pennsylvania cancer and HIV expert Carl June, MD, has been named one of two recipients of the 2015 Paul Ehrlich and Ludwig Darmstaedter Prize for his outstanding work in cancer immunotherapy. Since 1952, the Paul Ehrlich and Ludwig Darmstaedter Prize has been awarded to scientists who have made great advancements in the fields in which Paul Ehrlich worked, in particular immunology, cancer research, microbiology, and chemotherapy. [More]
WHO releases first-ever guidance for chronic hepatitis B treatment

WHO releases first-ever guidance for chronic hepatitis B treatment

WHO today issued its first-ever guidance for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B, a viral infection which is spread through blood and body fluids, attacking the liver and resulting in an estimated 650 000 deaths each year - most of them in low- and middle-income countries. [More]
UC San Diego scientist selected to receive Linda E. Saltzman New Investigator Award

UC San Diego scientist selected to receive Linda E. Saltzman New Investigator Award

Jamila K. Stockman, PhD, MPH, assistant professor of medicine and global public health at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine has been selected to receive the Linda E. Saltzman New Investigator Award. [More]
TSRI researchers create picture of whole dynein-dynactin structure

TSRI researchers create picture of whole dynein-dynactin structure

A team led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute has determined the basic structural organization of a molecular motor that hauls cargoes and performs other critical functions within cells. [More]
Brazil's first open-access research facility to be established at UNICAMP

Brazil's first open-access research facility to be established at UNICAMP

Open-access research into drug discovery has arrived in South America, with a ground-breaking collaboration between leading scientists in North America, Europe and Brazil to provide completely free and open research results to the world. [More]
CUGH conference brings world's leading researchers together to tackle global health challenges

CUGH conference brings world's leading researchers together to tackle global health challenges

The sixth annual Consortium of Universities for Global Health conference is creating a stir by bringing together some of the world's leading researchers to tackle many of the biggest global health challenges we face. [More]
Mylan releases Fentanyl Transdermal System 37.5, 62.5 and 87.5 mcg/hr in U.S.

Mylan releases Fentanyl Transdermal System 37.5, 62.5 and 87.5 mcg/hr in U.S.

Mylan N.V. and Mylan Inc. today announced the U.S. launch of its Fentanyl Transdermal System 37.5, 62.5 and 87.5 mcg/hr, adding to its existing offering of Fentanyl Transdermal System 12, 25, 50, 75 and 100 mcg/hr. [More]
Fourth patient dosed in Benitec Biopharma's Phase I/IIa hepatitis C trial

Fourth patient dosed in Benitec Biopharma's Phase I/IIa hepatitis C trial

Benitec Biopharma, a biopharmaceutical company focused on providing potentially curative therapies with its proprietary gene-silencing technology called ddRNAi or "expressed RNAi," today announced that the fourth patient in the company's Phase I/IIa dose escalation clinical trial of its lead program TT-034 for treating hepatitis C was dosed at the Duke Clinical Research Unit. [More]
Simple low-cost intervention could help reduce HIV-related deaths in Africa

Simple low-cost intervention could help reduce HIV-related deaths in Africa

A new approach to care for patients with advanced HIV in Tanzania and Zambia, combining community support and screening for a type of meningitis, has reduced deaths by 28%. [More]
Salk scientists move one step closer to creating drug that could prevent HIV virus

Salk scientists move one step closer to creating drug that could prevent HIV virus

Imagine a single drug that could prevent human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, treat patients who have already contracted HIV, and even remove all the dormant copies of the virus from those with the more advanced disease. It sounds like science fiction, but Salk scientists have gotten one step closer to creating such a drug by customizing a powerful defense system used by many bacteria and training this scissor-like machinery to recognize the HIV virus. [More]
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