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Novel PET radiotracer reveals epigenetic activity in the human brain for the first time

Novel PET radiotracer reveals epigenetic activity in the human brain for the first time

A novel PET radiotracer developed at the Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging at Massachusetts General Hospital is able for the first time to reveal epigenetic activity - the process that determines whether or not genes are expressed - within the human brain. [More]
New research examines link between alcohol use and unprotected sex among young women

New research examines link between alcohol use and unprotected sex among young women

It may come as little surprise that alcohol use is widespread among young adults. In the U.S., 70 percent of adults aged 18 to 24 drink alcohol, with 40 percent of women imbibing over the recommended daily limit of 3 drinks per day. [More]
Coordinated treatment for both illnesses could save lives of people with HIV and TB

Coordinated treatment for both illnesses could save lives of people with HIV and TB

Tuberculosis (TB) is a leading killer of people with HIV, and providing therapy for both illnesses simultaneously saves lives - according to new guidelines on the treatment of drug-susceptible TB developed jointly by the American Thoracic Society, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and Infectious Diseases Society of America. [More]
Video selfies of tooth-brushing can help improve oral health care techniques, study shows

Video selfies of tooth-brushing can help improve oral health care techniques, study shows

Recording smart phone video "selfies" of tooth-brushing can help people learn to improve their oral health care techniques, according to a new study. [More]
Noninvasive approach using pulsed electric fields may reduce scarring after burn injuries

Noninvasive approach using pulsed electric fields may reduce scarring after burn injuries

A Massachusetts General Hospital research team has reported that repeated treatment with pulsed electric fields - a noninvasive procedure that does not generate heat - may help reduce the development of scarring. [More]
College students who misuse stimulant medications more likely to exhibit clinical psychiatric dysfunction

College students who misuse stimulant medications more likely to exhibit clinical psychiatric dysfunction

A new study by Massachusetts General Hospital investigators finds that college students who misuse stimulant drugs are more likely to have attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), conduct disorder or substance-use disorder than are students not misusing stimulants. [More]
Three vaccine candidates provide complete protection against Zika virus in rhesus monkeys

Three vaccine candidates provide complete protection against Zika virus in rhesus monkeys

A month after announcing that two promising vaccine candidates provided mice with complete protection against the Zika virus, a research team at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, in collaboration with scientists at Walter Reed Army Institute of Research and the University of São Paulo, now reports achieving complete protection against Zika virus in rhesus monkeys. [More]
New study compares sexual experiences linked to alcohol and marijuana use

New study compares sexual experiences linked to alcohol and marijuana use

A new study, published in Archives of Sexual Behavior by researchers affiliated with New York University's Center for Drug Use and HIV Research, compared self-reported sexual experiences related to use of alcohol and marijuana. [More]
New study analyzes evolution of epigenetic mechanisms from bacteria to humans

New study analyzes evolution of epigenetic mechanisms from bacteria to humans

After the emergence of single-celled organisms some billions of years ago, nature started experimenting with how to diversify gene function without changing the sequence of the DNA, such that the blue print remains conserved, but allows gene products to have different functions. [More]
Researchers report promising vaccine strategy for immunizing against herpes viruses

Researchers report promising vaccine strategy for immunizing against herpes viruses

Oral and genital herpes are caused by the herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and the herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2), which both cause lifelong infection. HSV-2 infection is associated with increased risk for HIV infection. [More]
People with lymphatic filariasis more likely to acquire HIV infection, study shows

People with lymphatic filariasis more likely to acquire HIV infection, study shows

People infected with a parasitic worm called Wuchereria bancrofti in areas where HIV is endemic may be more likely to acquire HIV than people who are not infected with the worm, according to a new study in southwest Tanzania, published in The Lancet. [More]
Research could provide new insights into finding cure for chronic infections

Research could provide new insights into finding cure for chronic infections

New research has taken us a step closer to finding a cure for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), as well as other infections including the glandular fever virus, which is associated with the development of lymphoma. [More]
Researchers develop new hybrid method to study HIV protein involved in disease progression

Researchers develop new hybrid method to study HIV protein involved in disease progression

More than 36 million people worldwide, including 1.2 million in the U.S., are living with an HIV infection. Today's anti-retroviral cocktails block how HIV replicates, matures and gets into uninfected cells, but they can't eradicate the virus. [More]
People with filariasis show two to three-fold increased risk for HIV

People with filariasis show two to three-fold increased risk for HIV

Since the start of the HIV epidemic, there have been speculations as to why HIV and the immunodeficiency syndrome it causes have spread so much more in Africa than in other countries around the world. [More]
Study shows link between inflammatory biomarkers and prevalence of CAD in HIV-infected men

Study shows link between inflammatory biomarkers and prevalence of CAD in HIV-infected men

A cardiac imaging study led by Hossein Bahrami, MD, PhD, assistant professor of cardiovascular medicine at the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California, along with investigators from Johns Hopkins University and five other institutions, showed a correlation between higher inflammatory biomarkers and an increased prevalence of coronary artery disease (CAD) in men infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). [More]
Lower weight late in life linked to greater risk for Alzheimer's disease

Lower weight late in life linked to greater risk for Alzheimer's disease

Researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital and Massachusetts General Hospital have found an association between lower weight and more extensive deposits of the Alzheimer's-associated protein beta-amyloid in the brains of cognitively normal older individuals. [More]
GW researchers identify new way to regulate chronic toxoplasmosis

GW researchers identify new way to regulate chronic toxoplasmosis

New research critical to treatment for chronic toxoplasmosis, one of the most common parasitic diseases worldwide, was published in the Journal of Experimental Medicine. [More]
Early initiation of antiretroviral therapy can considerably reduce total HIV DNA levels

Early initiation of antiretroviral therapy can considerably reduce total HIV DNA levels

A team of researchers, led by Drs. Merlin Robb and Jintanat Ananworanich of the U.S. Military HIV Research Program at the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, has found that when antiretroviral therapy (ART) is initiated during early acute HIV infection, it can significantly reduce total HIV DNA levels in the body, which may have implications for the goal of achieving long-term HIV remission. [More]
New drug prevents vaginal and oral transmission of HIV in pre-clinical animal models

New drug prevents vaginal and oral transmission of HIV in pre-clinical animal models

HIV remains a major health concern for women and children globally. Worldwide, the majority of new HIV infections occur in young women. Each year, 1.5 million women living with HIV become pregnant. [More]
Ortho Clinical Diagnostics to showcase seven posters of vital tests, six products at AACC meeting

Ortho Clinical Diagnostics to showcase seven posters of vital tests, six products at AACC meeting

Ortho Clinical Diagnostics today announced it will present seven scientific posters on its assays and display six products at its booth at the 2016 American Association for Clinical Chemistry annual meeting. [More]
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