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Funding improves for maternal, child health compared to donor investments in HIV, TB and malaria

Funding improves for maternal, child health compared to donor investments in HIV, TB and malaria

Funding earmarked for improving maternal and child health in low- and middle-income countries has grown faster since 2010 than funding for HIV, TB, and malaria. [More]
Johns Hopkins study suggests updated universal screening for hepatitis C virus

Johns Hopkins study suggests updated universal screening for hepatitis C virus

A review of blood samples for nearly 5,000 patients seen at The Johns Hopkins Hospital Emergency Department suggests that federal guidelines for hepatitis C virus (HCV) screening may be missing up to a quarter of all cases and argues for updated universal screening. [More]
New research in SIV-exposed monkeys provides insights for development of HIV prevention strategies

New research in SIV-exposed monkeys provides insights for development of HIV prevention strategies

New research in monkeys exposed to SIV, the monkey equivalent of HIV, suggests that the virus spreads rapidly in the body and triggers early host responses that suppress antiviral immunity, thus promoting viral replication. [More]
Researchers develop novel method to store microfluidic devices for CD4 T cell testing

Researchers develop novel method to store microfluidic devices for CD4 T cell testing

Providing vital health care services to people in developing countries without reliable electricity, refrigeration and state-of-the-art medical equipment poses a number of challenges. Inspired by pregnancy tests, researchers from Florida Atlantic University, Stanford University, and Baskent University in Turkey, have developed a novel method to store microfluidic devices for CD4 T cell testing in extreme weather conditions for up to six months without refrigeration. [More]
Hepatitis C treatment can be provided safely, effectively within community-based setting

Hepatitis C treatment can be provided safely, effectively within community-based setting

A new study, presented today, demonstrates treatment for Hepatitis C can be provided safely and effectively within a community-based and non-specialist setting. This illustrates the potential for alternative providers to ease pressure on currently overburdened specialists. The study, sponsored by the National Institutes of Health, was presented at The International Liver Congress 2016 in Barcelona, Spain. [More]
HCV patients with hepatocellular carcinoma history could re-develop illness during or after taking DAAs

HCV patients with hepatocellular carcinoma history could re-develop illness during or after taking DAAs

Data from a new study show that patients with Hepatitis C virus (HCV) taking direct-acting antiviral treatments (DAAs), who have previously fought off hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the most common form of liver cancer,1 had a 'high rate' of re-developing their illness. [More]
Studies offer alternative conclusions on efficacy of DAAs for HIV and HCV co-infected patients

Studies offer alternative conclusions on efficacy of DAAs for HIV and HCV co-infected patients

Two separate studies presented today at The International Liver Congress 2016 in Barcelona, Spain have offered alternative conclusions regarding the efficacy of direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) among patients co-infected with HIV and Hepatitis C virus (HCV). [More]
Prime boost approach can increase possibility of combined HCV and HIV vaccination

Prime boost approach can increase possibility of combined HCV and HIV vaccination

A combined vaccination against Hepatitis C virus (HCV) and HIV moved a step closer, with the results of a study presented at The International Liver Congress 2016 in Barcelona, Spain today. [More]
New data from studies evaluating diagnostic tools, therapies for infectious diseases released at ECCMID 2016

New data from studies evaluating diagnostic tools, therapies for infectious diseases released at ECCMID 2016

New data from ten late-breaking abstracts is released at ECCMID 2016 – the annual meeting of the European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Disease. [More]
Research shows viruses work in groups to attack host cells more effectively

Research shows viruses work in groups to attack host cells more effectively

Research at the Cavanilles Institute of Biodiversity and Evolutionary Biology of the University of Valencia, led by professor Rafael Sanjuán, reveals that viruses work in groups to attack host cells more effectively. The results of this study were published in the journal 'Cell Host & Microbe'. [More]
Innovative HIV vaccine candidate generates protection against repeated AIDS virus exposures

Innovative HIV vaccine candidate generates protection against repeated AIDS virus exposures

Mymetics Corporation, a pioneer in the research and development of virosome-based vaccines to prevent transmission of human infectious diseases across mucosal membranes, announced today that its innovative HIV vaccine candidate has shown to generate significant protection in groups of twelve female monkeys against repeated AIDS virus exposures during part of the preclinical study. [More]
Structure-based approach could lead to effective HIV vaccine

Structure-based approach could lead to effective HIV vaccine

It's been known for some time that the immune system can produce antibodies capable of "neutralizing" HIV, and stopping the AIDS-causing virus dead in its tracks. [More]
First-ever immature antibody found in immune molecules may help combat HIV

First-ever immature antibody found in immune molecules may help combat HIV

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute and collaborating institutions have described the first-ever immature or “teenage” antibody found in a powerful class of immune molecules effective against HIV. [More]
GHIT Fund invests in two innovative malaria eradication tools

GHIT Fund invests in two innovative malaria eradication tools

The Global Health Innovative Technology Fund (GHIT Fund) announced today that it’s investing US$1,383,785 in a pair of innovative malaria eradication tools—a vaccine that could block transmission of two species of the deadly disease and a rapid field test that can reveal a malaria infection in minutes. [More]

Researchers apply robust parameter selection, verification techniques to dynamic HIV model

Physical and biological models often have hundreds of inputs, many of which may have a negligible effect on a model's response. Establishing parameters that can be fixed at nominal values without significantly affecting model outputs is often challenging; sometimes these parameters cannot be simply discerned by the outputs. [More]
Blood test to determine risk of heart disease may benefit middle-aged black women

Blood test to determine risk of heart disease may benefit middle-aged black women

Middle-aged black women have higher levels of a protein in their blood associated with a predictor of heart disease than their white counterparts, even after other factors, such as obesity, are taken into consideration, according to a study conducted by the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health and School of Medicine. [More]
NHS England to provide crucial funding for Janssen's HIV treatment, REZOLSTA

NHS England to provide crucial funding for Janssen's HIV treatment, REZOLSTA

Janssen-Cilag Ltd today announced that NHS England will provide crucial funding for its once-daily, fixed-dose combination of darunavir and the pharmacoenhancer, cobicistat, called REZOLSTA. [More]
Fecal transplants transfer bacterial viruses that appear to be harmless to humans

Fecal transplants transfer bacterial viruses that appear to be harmless to humans

Communities of viruses can be transferred during fecal transplants, according to a study published this week in mBio, an online open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology. Fortunately for patients who use this procedure, the viruses found to be transmitted in this study appear to be harmless to humans. [More]
Research on multiple sexual behaviors among men is lacking

Research on multiple sexual behaviors among men is lacking

Sexual health research focused on men who have sex with men is lacking, according to health researchers, even in the midst of rising rates of sexually transmitted infections, including HIV, in this population. [More]
Failure to complete antibiotics could lead to additional treatment for existing skin infection

Failure to complete antibiotics could lead to additional treatment for existing skin infection

In the first study of its kind, researchers found patients with S. aureus skin and soft tissue infections took, on average, just 57% of their prescribed antibiotic doses after leaving the hospital, resulting in nearly half of them getting a new infection or needing additional treatment for the existing skin infection. [More]
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