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HIV protein alters activity of networked neurons

HIV protein alters activity of networked neurons

Nearly half of HIV infected patients suffer from impaired neurocognitive function. The HIV protein transactivator of transcription (Tat) is an important contributor to HIV neuropathogenesis because it is a potent neurotoxin that continues to be produced despite treatment with antiretroviral therapy. [More]
EC approves expanded use of Daklinza (daclatasvir) for patients with chronic HCV and HIV co-infection

EC approves expanded use of Daklinza (daclatasvir) for patients with chronic HCV and HIV co-infection

Bristol-Myers Squibb today announced that the European Commission has approved the expanded use of Daklinza, a first-in-class oral, once-a-day pill used in combination with other treatments as an option for adult patients with chronic hepatitis C virus infection who are co-infected with HIV or who have had a prior liver transplant. [More]
HIV persists in the body despite effective antiretroviral therapy

HIV persists in the body despite effective antiretroviral therapy

A team of international scientists led by Northwestern University found that HIV is still replicating in lymphoid tissue, even when it is undetectable in the blood of patients on antiretroviral drugs. [More]
Using centrifugal elutriation and flow cytometry to answer biological questions: an interview with Peter Lopez

Using centrifugal elutriation and flow cytometry to answer biological questions: an interview with Peter Lopez

Flow Cytometry, the measurement of various cellular characteristics as they flow through a measuring apparatus, has so many applications that it's hard to know where to begin. [More]
Ageing 2016 summit to explore various aspects of processes, research on ageing and senescence

Ageing 2016 summit to explore various aspects of processes, research on ageing and senescence

Ageing 2016 will be held from February 9 to 11, 2016 at Cineworld: The O2 Peninsula Square London SE10 0DX United Kingdom. The annual international summit will look at the various aspects of processes and research involved in ageing and senescence. [More]
Scientists demonstrate effectiveness of ART in HIV-infected infants

Scientists demonstrate effectiveness of ART in HIV-infected infants

Recent clinical trials conducted in South Africa have established that babies born with HIV should be treated with antiretroviral therapy (ART) as early as possible, since earlier treatment significantly decreases their mortality and morbidity rates. [More]
Opt-out HIV testing could substantially increase patient acceptance of HIV testing

Opt-out HIV testing could substantially increase patient acceptance of HIV testing

How you offer patients an HIV test has a significant impact on the likelihood of them accepting tests, finds a study published by The BMJ today. [More]
Immunotherapy could be the future of cancer treatments

Immunotherapy could be the future of cancer treatments

For decades most cancers have been treated with the standard of care treatments which typically include surgery, radiation and/or chemotherapy. Now there is talk that immunotherapy represents "the future of cancer treatments." [More]
Johnson & Johnson joins industry-wide call to address growing problem of antimicrobial resistance

Johnson & Johnson joins industry-wide call to address growing problem of antimicrobial resistance

Johnson & Johnson today announced it has joined more than 80 companies and organizations in signing the Declaration on Combating Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR), an industry-wide call to action announced at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland. [More]
Estrogen helps women fight flu virus better than men

Estrogen helps women fight flu virus better than men

Estrogen dramatically reduced the amount of flu virus that replicated in infected cells from women but not from men, a new study by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health shows. [More]
New technique may accelerate development of novel vaccines

New technique may accelerate development of novel vaccines

An interdisciplinary team of Oxford University researchers has devised a new technique to speed up the development of novel vaccines. [More]
Text message reminders may help reduce people’s blood pressure

Text message reminders may help reduce people’s blood pressure

The study, of over 1300 adults with high blood pressure in the Cape Town area, compared text message reminders and interactive text messaging to a control group receiving standard care. The results appear online in the American Heart Association journal Circulation. [More]
Profectus begins Phase 1 clinical study of VesiculoVax-vectored Ebola virus vaccine

Profectus begins Phase 1 clinical study of VesiculoVax-vectored Ebola virus vaccine

Profectus BioSciences, Inc., a clinical-stage vaccine company developing novel vaccines for the prevention and treatment of infectious diseases and the treatment of cancer, announced today the initiation of a Phase 1 clinical study of Profectus' VesiculoVax-vectored Ebola virus vaccine. [More]
Mylan releases generic version of Felbatol Tablets in U.S.

Mylan releases generic version of Felbatol Tablets in U.S.

Mylan N.V. today announced the U.S. launch of Felbamate Tablets USP, 400 mg and 600 mg, which is the generic version of Meda Pharms' Felbatol Tablets. Mylan received final approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for its Abbreviated New Drug Application (ANDA) for this product. [More]
Adaptive, light-activated nanotherapy effective against drug-resistant bacteria

Adaptive, light-activated nanotherapy effective against drug-resistant bacteria

In the ever-escalating evolutionary battle with drug-resistant bacteria, humans may soon have a leg up thanks to adaptive, light-activated nanotherapy developed by researchers at the University of Colorado Boulder. [More]
New discovery may help researchers tackle mitochondrial diseases and age-related diseases

New discovery may help researchers tackle mitochondrial diseases and age-related diseases

Buck Institute faculty Judith Campisi, PhD, says age researchers need to stop thinking of cellular senescence, now accepted as an important driver of aging, as a single phenotype that stems from genotoxic stress. Research from her lab reveals that cellular senescence, a process whereby cells permanently lose the ability to divide, is also induced by signaling from dysfunctional mitochondria - and that the arrested cells secrete a distinctly different "stew" of biologically active factors in a process unrelated to the damaging free radicals that are created in mitochondria as part of oxygen metabolism. [More]
Estrogen may protect women against flu

Estrogen may protect women against flu

The female sex hormone estrogen has anti-viral effects against the influenza A virus, commonly known as the flu, a new study in American Journal of Physiology—Lung Cellular and Molecular Physiology reports. [More]
Sedentary behavior associated with poor cardiovascular health, diabetes in people with severe obesity

Sedentary behavior associated with poor cardiovascular health, diabetes in people with severe obesity

Sedentary behavior is associated with poor cardiovascular health and diabetes in adults with severe obesity, independent of how much exercise they perform, a University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health-led study showed for the first time. [More]
Researchers use quick screening method to identify, test promising anti-Ebola drugs

Researchers use quick screening method to identify, test promising anti-Ebola drugs

A quick screening method has been used for the first time in a standard open laboratory to identify and test promising anti-Ebola drugs. This approach increases the possibility of finding new therapies faster. [More]
AiCure closes $12.25 million in Series A fundraising round

AiCure closes $12.25 million in Series A fundraising round

AiCure, an artificial intelligence company connecting the world's patients to better treatments and improved health, has closed a Series A fundraising round with $12.25 million. The consortium is led by New Leaf Venture Partners, with additional participation from Pritzker Group Venture Capital, Tribeca Venture Partners, and Biomatics Capital, established by Boris Nikolic, former Chief Advisor for Science and Technology to Bill Gates. [More]
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