HIV News and Research RSS Feed - HIV News and Research

Early antiretroviral treatment prevents AIDS- and non-AIDS-related diseases in HIV-infected people

Early antiretroviral treatment prevents AIDS- and non-AIDS-related diseases in HIV-infected people

Starting antiretroviral therapy early not only prevents serious AIDS-related diseases, but also prevents the onset of cancer, cardiovascular disease, and other non-AIDS-related diseases in HIV-infected people, according to a new analysis of data from the Strategic Timing of AntiRetroviral Treatment (START) study, the first large-scale randomized clinical trial to establish that earlier antiretroviral treatment benefits all HIV-infected individuals. [More]
Young, single South African women adhere well to daily PrEP regimen to prevent HIV infection

Young, single South African women adhere well to daily PrEP regimen to prevent HIV infection

A clinical study funded by the National Institutes of Health has found that young, single black women in South Africa adhered to a daily pill regimen to prevent HIV infection--an HIV prevention strategy known as pre-exposure prophylaxis, or PrEP. This finding is the first strong indication that this population at substantial HIV risk could accept and reliably adhere to daily PrEP dosing. [More]
Beckman Coulter announces expansion of Cellular Accessible Retroviral Evaluation Systems Initiative at International AIDS Society 2015

Beckman Coulter announces expansion of Cellular Accessible Retroviral Evaluation Systems Initiative at International AIDS Society 2015

Beckman Coulter Life Sciences today announces an expansion of its CARES (Cellular Accessible Retroviral Evaluation Systems) Initiative at the 2015 International AIDS Society (IAS) Conference, being held at the Vancouver Convention Centre from July 19-22, 2015 in Vancouver, Canada. CARES focuses on providing innovative solutions for the monitoring of HIV and AIDS treatment in Africa. [More]

Phase II open-label study demonstrates that high-risk populations adhere well to daily regimen of PrEP

Results from HPTN 067, a Phase II, randomized, open-label study, demonstrate most study participants had higher coverage of sex events and better adherence when they were assigned to the daily dosing arm, investigators from the HIV Prevention Trials Network (HPTN) reported today at the 8th International AIDS Society Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention in Vancouver, Canada. [More]
Study findings provide basis for potential development of new methods to control HIV infection

Study findings provide basis for potential development of new methods to control HIV infection

Lower levels of cholesterol in certain immune cells--a result of enhanced cholesterol metabolism within those cells--may help explain why some HIV-infected people are able to naturally control disease progression, according to research that will be presented in a poster at the 8th International AIDS Society Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention (IAS 2015) in Vancouver, Canada, and the pre-conference 2015 Towards an HIV Cure Symposium. [More]
TSRI scientists awarded two grants to develop new therapeutic target to reduce latent HIV infection

TSRI scientists awarded two grants to develop new therapeutic target to reduce latent HIV infection

Scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute have been awarded a pair of grants totaling nearly $2.8 million from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases of The National Institutes of Health to develop a new therapeutic agent to reduce latent levels of HIV that hide from the immune system in infected individuals. [More]
Canadian researchers discover how HIV evades the body's antiviral responses

Canadian researchers discover how HIV evades the body's antiviral responses

A Canadian research team at the IRCM in Montreal, led by molecular virologist Eric A. Cohen, PhD, made a significant discovery on how HIV escapes the body's antiviral responses. The team uncovered how an HIV viral protein known as Vpu tricks the immune system by using its own regulatory process to evade the host's first line of defence. [More]
Study examines self-reported use of bath salts among high school seniors in the U.S.

Study examines self-reported use of bath salts among high school seniors in the U.S.

Recent years have seen an unprecedented growth in number and availability of new synthetic psychoactive drugs in the US and worldwide. In 2014, 101 new psychoactive drugs were identified, worldwide. Such drugs are often sold as "legal" highs or "research chemicals" over the internet or in head shops. Among these new drugs, "bath salts" appear to be one of the more commonly used in the US. [More]
Magnetic nanoparticles may hold key to bringing immunotherapy into successful clinical use

Magnetic nanoparticles may hold key to bringing immunotherapy into successful clinical use

In recent years, researchers have hotly pursued immunotherapy, a promising form of treatment that relies on harnessing and training the body's own immune system to better fight cancer and infection. Now, results of a study led by Johns Hopkins investigators suggests that a device composed of a magnetic column paired with custom-made magnetic nanoparticles may hold a key to bringing immunotherapy into widespread and successful clinical use. [More]
Ebola vaccine study begins in Dakar, Senegal

Ebola vaccine study begins in Dakar, Senegal

A trial to evaluate an Ebola vaccine has begun in Dakar, Senegal, after initial immunisations started at the Jenner Institute, Oxford University. The announcement comes as a conference in Oxford discusses the global response to Ebola and the implications for future drug and vaccine development. [More]
Mylan announces launch of generic Namenda Tablets in U.S.

Mylan announces launch of generic Namenda Tablets in U.S.

Mylan N.V. today announced the U.S. launch of Memantine Hydrochloride Tablets USP, 5 mg and 10 mg, which is the generic version of Forest's Namenda Tablets. [More]
New report highlights key success in global response to preventing AIDS in women, children

New report highlights key success in global response to preventing AIDS in women, children

The Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation applauds today's announcement from the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS that the goal of providing 15 million people with lifesaving antiretroviral therapy (ART) by 2015 has been met nine months ahead of schedule. [More]
Stopping cocaine use may lower levels of ET-1 protein that plays key role in coronary artery disease

Stopping cocaine use may lower levels of ET-1 protein that plays key role in coronary artery disease

For people who use cocaine, stopping or reducing cocaine use is associated with decreased levels of endothelin-1 (ET-1)--a protein that plays a key role in the development of coronary artery disease, reports a study in the Journal of Addiction Medicine, the official journal of the American Society of Addiction Medicine. [More]
VUMC becomes Human Vaccines Project's first scientific hub

VUMC becomes Human Vaccines Project's first scientific hub

Vanderbilt University Medical Center, the Human Vaccines Project and the International AIDS Vaccine Initiative are pleased to announce that VUMC has become the Project's first scientific hub. [More]
Starting anti-HIV treatment early improves survival among patients with newly diagnosed TB

Starting anti-HIV treatment early improves survival among patients with newly diagnosed TB

Starting anti-HIV treatment within two weeks of the diagnosis of tuberculosis, or TB, improved survival among patients with both infections who had very low immune-cell counts, according to an analysis by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Health. [More]

Faith-based health providers crucial in achieving universal health coverage for poor, marginalised people

Faith-based organisations are crucial in achieving the promise of universal health coverage—an adequate standard of health care for all people—especially for poor and marginalised groups, according to a new three-part Series on faith-based health care, published in The Lancet. [More]
Mylan announces launch of Bexarotene 75mg Capsules in U.S.

Mylan announces launch of Bexarotene 75mg Capsules in U.S.

Mylan N.V. today announced the U.S. launch of Bexarotene 75mg Capsules, which is the generic version of Valeant's Targretin Capsules. This product is indicated for the treatment of cutaneous manifestations of cutaneous t-cell lymphoma in patients who are refractory to at least one prior systemic therapy. [More]
TSRI study reveals alternative approach to current anti-HIV strategies

TSRI study reveals alternative approach to current anti-HIV strategies

HIV-infected patients remain on antiretroviral therapy for life because the virus survives over the long-term in infected dormant cells. Interruption of current types of antiretroviral therapy results in a rebound of the virus and clinical progression to AIDS. [More]
Johns Hopkins, IOCB Prague sign drug discovery research agreement

Johns Hopkins, IOCB Prague sign drug discovery research agreement

The Johns Hopkins Drug Discovery (JHDD) program, created with the mission of identifying novel drug targets arising from Johns Hopkins faculty research and translating them into new therapeutics, and the Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry, The Czech Academy of Sciences (IOCB Prague) have entered into a five-year drug discovery research agreement to develop small-molecule and peptide drugs for a range of therapeutic areas including neurological diseases, cancer and gastrointestinal disorders. [More]

Three South Florida research centers receive Campbell Foundation grants for HIV/AIDS studies

New research is taking place all around the world in the fight to find a cure for AIDS. But did you know that some critical research is taking place in our own backyard? That’s why The Campbell Foundation recently provided three South Florida research centers each with $30,000 fast-track grants to assist them with their ground-breaking investigations. [More]
Advertisement