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Nearly half of newly-infected HIV patients experience neurologic issues

Nearly half of newly-infected HIV patients experience neurologic issues

A team led by researchers from UCSF and Yale has found that half of people newly infected with HIV experience neurologic issues. These neurologic findings are generally not severe and usually resolve after participants started anti-retroviral therapy. [More]
WHO urges all countries to establish blood services based on voluntary non-remunerated blood donations

WHO urges all countries to establish blood services based on voluntary non-remunerated blood donations

Voluntary, unpaid blood donations must be increased rapidly in more than half the world’s countries in order to ensure a reliable supply of safe blood for patients whose lives depend on it, the World Health Organization said on World Blood Donor Day. [More]
Study captures interactions of HIV-infected immune cells in living animal

Study captures interactions of HIV-infected immune cells in living animal

By watching brightly glowing HIV-infected immune cells move within mice, researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai have shown how infected immune cells latch onto an uninfected sister cell to directly transmit newly minted viral particles. [More]
Utah researchers find way to use power of protease to destroy budding AIDS virus

Utah researchers find way to use power of protease to destroy budding AIDS virus

When new AIDS virus particles bud from an infected cell, an enzyme named protease activates to help the viruses mature and infect more cells. That's why modern AIDS drugs control the disease by inhibiting protease. [More]
Unique method opens door to development of simple diagnostic tests for myriad diseases

Unique method opens door to development of simple diagnostic tests for myriad diseases

Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh have developed a unique method for detecting antibodies in the blood of patients in a proof-of-principle study that opens the door to development of simple diagnostic tests for diseases for which no microbial cause is known, including auto-immune diseases, cancers and other conditions. [More]
Study finds non-disclosure of sexual orientation among behaviorally bisexual men

Study finds non-disclosure of sexual orientation among behaviorally bisexual men

Research conducted at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health and Public Health Solutions examined the reasons why men who have had sex with both men and women choose not to disclose their sexual orientation -- particularly to their wives and girlfriends. [More]
Scientists explore effects of physiological fluid shear on dangerous type of Salmonella

Scientists explore effects of physiological fluid shear on dangerous type of Salmonella

Once inside the human body, infectious microbes like Salmonella face a fluid situation. They live in a watery world, surrounded by liquid continually flowing over and abrading their cell surfaces--a property known as fluid shear. [More]
Thailand certified free of mother-to-child transmission of HIV and syphilis

Thailand certified free of mother-to-child transmission of HIV and syphilis

Thailand has been officially certified free of the transmission of HIV and syphilis from mothers to their children. [More]
Lifestyle intervention program can increase physical activity levels of adults at risk for type 2 diabetes

Lifestyle intervention program can increase physical activity levels of adults at risk for type 2 diabetes

Adults at risk for type 2 diabetes or heart disease or both can substantially increase their physical activity levels through participating in a lifestyle intervention program developed at the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health for use in community-settings, such as senior centers or worksites. [More]
Study finds differences in hospitalization trends for gout and rheumatoid arthritis

Study finds differences in hospitalization trends for gout and rheumatoid arthritis

While hospitalizations related to rheumatoid arthritis have dropped considerably over the past two decades, hospitalizations primarily associated with gout have increased dramatically. [More]
Screening for syphilis in persons at risk for infection provides substantial benefit

Screening for syphilis in persons at risk for infection provides substantial benefit

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force has found convincing evidence that screening for syphilis infection in asymptomatic, nonpregnant persons at increased risk for infection provides substantial benefit. The report appears in the June 7 issue of JAMA. [More]
Common angina drug can stimulate patient's own white blood cells to combat cryptococcosis

Common angina drug can stimulate patient's own white blood cells to combat cryptococcosis

A drug, more commonly used in the treatment of angina, could be the focus of a new strategy in fighting the fatal fungal infection cryptococcosis [More]
New systems-based strategy may help accelerate TB drug discovery

New systems-based strategy may help accelerate TB drug discovery

The rise in multi-drug resistant (MDR) and extremely drug resistant (XDR) strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) is becoming a major cause of global health concern for treating tuberculosis, which affects a third of the global population. [More]

NHS England takes too long to commission PrEP for HIV prevention

An effective treatment that can prevent HIV infection and reduce the human and financial costs of the preventable condition is taking too long to be commissioned and made available on the NHS, warns Deborah Gold, chief executive of the National Aids Trust, in an article published by The BMJ today. [More]
Improved research tool may open door to effective HIV vaccine designs

Improved research tool may open door to effective HIV vaccine designs

Vaccines are usually medicine's best defense against the world's deadliest microbes. However, HIV is so mutable that it has so far effectively evaded both the human immune system and scientists' attempts to make an effective vaccine to protect against it. [More]
Overweight adolescents can increase physical activity by using their built environment

Overweight adolescents can increase physical activity by using their built environment

A program encouraging overweight or obese adolescents to increase their physical activity through use of their everyday environment, rather than organized classes or sports programs, produced significant increases in participants' daily physical activity that were sustained for at least three to four months. [More]
Fasnall drug appears to inhibit tumor growth by promoting cancer cell death

Fasnall drug appears to inhibit tumor growth by promoting cancer cell death

A promising new compound appears to impede a process that fuels breast cancer in mice, a discovery that could have implications in the treatment of a host of cancers. [More]
UBC study finds lower HIV testing rates among gay men living in small cities

UBC study finds lower HIV testing rates among gay men living in small cities

Men who live outside major Canadian cities and have sex with other men are less likely to get an HIV test than their metropolitan counterparts, a UBC study shows. [More]
RNA molecular dynamics research provides key insights into new treatments for retroviral diseases

RNA molecular dynamics research provides key insights into new treatments for retroviral diseases

New molecular dynamics research into how RNA folds into hairpin-shaped structures called tetraloops could provide important insights into new treatments for retroviral diseases. [More]
Gonorrhoea infections increase across Europe

Gonorrhoea infections increase across Europe

Since 2008, the overall rate of reported gonorrhoea infections has more than doubled across Europe, going up from 8 per 100 000 population to 20 cases per 100 000 persons in 2014. [More]
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