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Acquired immune deficiency syndrome or acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a disease of the human immune system caused by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).

This condition progressively reduces the effectiveness of the immune system and leaves individuals susceptible to opportunistic infections and tumors. HIV is transmitted through direct contact of a mucous membrane or the bloodstream with a bodily fluid containing HIV, such as blood, semen, vaginal fluid, preseminal fluid, and breast milk.
Shingles vaccine can help protect elderly patients with end-stage renal disease

Shingles vaccine can help protect elderly patients with end-stage renal disease

Elderly patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) who received the shingles vaccine were half as likely to develop shingles compared to those who were not vaccinated. The new study from Kaiser Permanente, published in Clinical Infectious Diseases, also found the best protection against shingles was achieved when patients received the vaccination shortly after beginning dialysis. [More]
Global Health Impact Index can measure actual impact of drugs worldwide

Global Health Impact Index can measure actual impact of drugs worldwide

Billions of dollars have been spent on developing drugs and supplying them around the world, but which companies' drugs are actually making an impact? The Global Health Impact Index, headed by Binghamton University Associate Professor Nicole Hassoun and highlighted in a new article published Friday in PLOS ONE, addresses this issue by ranking pharmaceutical companies based on their drugs' impact on global health. [More]
Four journalists from China and India win 2016 EurekAlert! Fellowships for International Science Reporters

Four journalists from China and India win 2016 EurekAlert! Fellowships for International Science Reporters

Four early-career journalists from China and India have emerged from the fiercest competition to date to win the 2016 EurekAlert! Fellowships for International Science Reporters. [More]
Access to harm reduction programs vey low in rural and suburban areas affected by HIV infections

Access to harm reduction programs vey low in rural and suburban areas affected by HIV infections

Access to harm reduction programs such as syringe exchange is lowest in rural and suburban areas, where rates of addiction to heroin and other opioids are on the rise, according to a study led by researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published online today in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. [More]
AIDS treatment can improve well-being of HIV-negative people

AIDS treatment can improve well-being of HIV-negative people

In rural Malawi, roughly 10 percent of the adult population has HIV. At the peak of the epidemic, in the 1990s and early 2000s, nearly everyone knew someone infected with or affected by the virus, what demographer Hans-Peter Kohler of the University of Pennsylvania describes as a generalized epidemic. [More]
Sangamo presents Phase 2 data from two ongoing clinical trials of SB-728-T for treatment of HIV/AIDS

Sangamo presents Phase 2 data from two ongoing clinical trials of SB-728-T for treatment of HIV/AIDS

Sangamo BioSciences, Inc., the leader in therapeutic genome editing, announced the presentation of Phase 2 data from two of the Company's ongoing clinical trials (SB-728-1101 Cohort 3* and SB-728-mR-1401) of SB-728-T, which is being developed for the functional control of HIV/AIDS. [More]
WHO launches new comprehensive analysis of global health trends

WHO launches new comprehensive analysis of global health trends

The World Health Organization (WHO) today launched a new comprehensive analysis of global health trends since 2000 and an assessment of the challenges for the next 15 years. [More]
FIRS calls for continued international support to end AIDS epidemic by 2030

FIRS calls for continued international support to end AIDS epidemic by 2030

World AIDS Day, held annually on the first day of December each year since 1988, is an opportunity for people around the world to join in the fight, show their support for those living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and commemorate the lives of those who have died. [More]

World Hepatitis Alliance highlights need to recognise impact of coinfection between HIV and viral hepatitis

Viral hepatitis is one of the leading causes of non-AIDS-related deaths among people living with HIV, yet often goes undiagnosed. Similar to HIV, the hepatitis B and hepatitis C viruses are blood-borne, having similar transmission routes like sexual contact for hepatitis B and injection drug use and sexual contact for hepatitis C. [More]
WHO recommends new strategies to treat HIV patients, reduce new infections

WHO recommends new strategies to treat HIV patients, reduce new infections

The world is poised to end the AIDS epidemic by 2030 – provided it can accelerate the pace of progress achieved globally over the past 15 years, according to a new World Health Organization (WHO) report. [More]

Scientists show how malaria parasites invade the liver

Scientists at the Center for Infectious Disease Research recently uncovered a critical piece in the puzzle of how malaria parasites infect their host. The work, recently published in Science Magazine, reveals the details of how the malaria parasite invades its initial target organ, the liver. Without infection of the liver, the parasites cannot multiply or spread to the blood. Infection of the blood causes illness, spread of the disease, and, ultimately, death. [More]
Health insurance coverage for transgender people is cost-effective, study finds

Health insurance coverage for transgender people is cost-effective, study finds

A new analysis led by the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health suggests that while most U.S. health insurance plans deny benefits to transgender men and women for medical care necessary to transition to the opposite sex, paying for sex reassignment surgery and hormones is actually cost-effective. [More]
Mylan releases Clozapine Orally Disintegrating Tablets in U.S.

Mylan releases Clozapine Orally Disintegrating Tablets in U.S.

Mylan N.V. today announced the U.S. launch of Clozapine Orally Disintegrating Tablets, 25 mg and 100 mg, the generic version of Jazz Pharmaceutical's FazaClo. [More]
Scientists identify mechanism that may help prostate cancer cells escape effects of cancer drugs

Scientists identify mechanism that may help prostate cancer cells escape effects of cancer drugs

Advanced prostate cancer is a disease notoriously resistant to treatment. New research by scientists at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and the University of California, San Francisco sheds light on a new mode of drug resistance to emerging therapies in metastatic prostate cancer. [More]
Achieving healthy weight before pregnancy can reduce risk of infant death

Achieving healthy weight before pregnancy can reduce risk of infant death

Achieving a healthy weight before becoming pregnant and gaining an appropriate amount of weight during pregnancy significantly reduce the risk of the baby dying in his or her first year of life, according to new research from the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health. [More]
TSRI researchers have new weapons to combat HIV

TSRI researchers have new weapons to combat HIV

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have new weapons in the fight against HIV. Their new study, published November 17, 2015 as the cover article of the journal Immunity, describes four prototype antibodies that target a specific weak spot on the virus. Guided by these antibodies, the researchers then mimicked the molecular structure of a protein on HIV when designing their own potential HIV vaccine candidate. [More]
Mylan announces U.S. launch of generic AXERT tablets

Mylan announces U.S. launch of generic AXERT tablets

Mylan N.V. today announced the U.S. launch of Almotriptan Tablets USP, 6.25 mg and 12.5 mg, the generic version of Janssen Pharmaceutical's AXERT. [More]

New US bipartisan study advocates promoting global health to advance wide range of American interests

A new US bipartisan study advocates promoting global health to both "do the right thing" and advance wide-ranging foreign policy interests. [More]
Public policy needed to reduce stem cell tourism, say experts

Public policy needed to reduce stem cell tourism, say experts

The continued marketing and use of experimental stem cell-based interventions inside and outside the United States is problematic and unsustainable, according to a new paper by science policy and bioethics experts at Rice University's Baker Institute for Public Policy and Wake Forest University. [More]

EGPAF, EJAF launch new project to expand HIV treatment, prevention efforts for adolescents in Africa

The Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation and the Elton John AIDS Foundation today launched a new project to expand HIV treatment and prevention efforts for adolescents in urban settings in Kenya and Zambia. [More]
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