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Hay fever (pollen allergy) is one of the most common kinds of allergies. About 35 million Americans suffer from hay fever. Pollen is made by trees, grasses, and weeds. During the spring, summer, and fall some plants release pollen into the air you breathe. Your symptoms might be different at different times of the year. It all depends on the kinds of plants that grow where you live and what allergies you have.
Climate change could contribute to increase in hay fever from ragweed pollen for millions

Climate change could contribute to increase in hay fever from ragweed pollen for millions

Climate change could cause new hay fever misery for millions of people across Europe - according to a new report from the FP7-EU project Atopica. [More]
Hygiene hypothesis: a misleading misnomer? An interview with Professor Sally Bloomfield

Hygiene hypothesis: a misleading misnomer? An interview with Professor Sally Bloomfield

Professor Strachan first proposed the hygiene hypothesis back in 1989. Reviewing the evidence, he suggested that one of the causes of the recent rapid rise in allergic diseases in children was lack of exposure to childhood infections [More]
Seasonal allergies may alter the brain, study shows

Seasonal allergies may alter the brain, study shows

Hay fever may do more than give you a stuffy nose and itchy eyes, seasonal allergies may change the brain, says a study published in the open-access journal Frontiers in Cellular Neuroscience. [More]
Genome-wide study sheds light on evolution of pollen allergens

Genome-wide study sheds light on evolution of pollen allergens

A joint University of Adelaide-Shanghai Jiao Tong University study has provided the first broad picture of the evolution and possible functions in the plant of pollen allergens. [More]
Common pesticides linked to allergic and non-allergic wheeze among farmers

Common pesticides linked to allergic and non-allergic wheeze among farmers

New research from North Carolina State University connects several pesticides commonly used by farmers with both allergic and non-allergic wheeze, which can be a sensitive marker for early airway problems. [More]
Eczema can increase patients' risk of developing several other health conditions

Eczema can increase patients' risk of developing several other health conditions

When a patient is diagnosed with eczema, the diagnosis of another medical condition may not be far behind. [More]
Scientists seek to understand impact of pollution on seasonal allergies

Scientists seek to understand impact of pollution on seasonal allergies

A unique collaboration between University of Manchester Scientists is set to advance our understanding of how polluted cities impact on seasonal allergies. [More]
Are your sunglasses safe? An interview with Omar Hassan

Are your sunglasses safe? An interview with Omar Hassan

All sunglasses that carry the CE mark block all UV rays, particularly if they're marked with the UV 400 label. [More]
Childhood exposure to microbes through thumb-sucking, nail-biting may lower risk of allergies

Childhood exposure to microbes through thumb-sucking, nail-biting may lower risk of allergies

Children who suck their thumbs or bite their nails may be less likely to develop allergies, according to a new study from New Zealand's University of Otago. [More]
Vision Express advises Britons to be 'sun safe' when choosing eyewear

Vision Express advises Britons to be 'sun safe' when choosing eyewear

Britons are putting their sight at risk – potentially exposing themselves to cataracts and macular degeneration – by choosing vanity over UV protection when buying sunglasses, new research from Vision Express has revealed. [More]
Pre-treatment with antihistamines may suppress gastrointestinal symptoms of food allergy

Pre-treatment with antihistamines may suppress gastrointestinal symptoms of food allergy

Simultaneous pre-treatment with antihistamines that block both the H1 and H4 antihistamine receptors suppressed the gastrointestinal symptoms of food allergy in mice, according to researchers at National Jewish Health. [More]
Researchers investigate effects of non-allergenic components of pollen on allergy sufferers

Researchers investigate effects of non-allergenic components of pollen on allergy sufferers

Up to now, research into pollen allergies has largely focused on allergens - those components of pollen that trigger hypersensitivity reactions. When it comes into contact with the nasal mucous membrane, however, pollen releases a host of other substances in addition to allergens. [More]
Allergen chip helps early detection of allergies

Allergen chip helps early detection of allergies

People can become allergically sensitized straight from birth. "Early screening is therefore important to detect allergies early so that steps can be taken to prevent serious forms of illness developing," say the MedUni Vienna allergy researchers, speaking on the occasion of World Immunology Day on 29 April and the current WHO World Immunization Week. [More]
WAO to address effects of climate change on pollen allergy season during World Allergy Week 2016

WAO to address effects of climate change on pollen allergy season during World Allergy Week 2016

Warmer weather brings joy to most people but misery for hay fever (pollen allergy) sufferers. For 50 million people in the United States alone, spring means sneezing spasms, itchy and watery eyes, and congestion at an annual cost of 18 billion. [More]
Higher intake of food-based vitamin D during pregnancy linked to reduced risk of allergies in children

Higher intake of food-based vitamin D during pregnancy linked to reduced risk of allergies in children

Higher intake of foods containing vitamin D during pregnancy - but not supplemental vitamin D intake - was associated with reduced risk of development of allergies in children, according to a study led by an investigator from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published today in The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. [More]
AlerSense develops world's first smart airborne allergy and asthma early warning system

AlerSense develops world's first smart airborne allergy and asthma early warning system

AlerSense Incorporated has created the world's first smart airborne allergy and asthma early warning system alerting consumers as particles and toxins build. AlerSense is an in-home unit when, combined with the mobile app, delivers accurate environmental readings, giving asthma and allergy sufferers precious time to remove themselves from, or alter the environment to possibly mitigate or avoid an allergy or asthma attack. [More]
Children with allergic disease have higher risk of heart disease

Children with allergic disease have higher risk of heart disease

Children with allergic disease, particularly asthma and hay fever, have about twice the rate of high blood pressure and high cholesterol, setting them on a course for heart disease at a surprisingly early age, reports a new Northwestern Medicine study. [More]
Researchers identify seven genetic risk loci involved in atopic march

Researchers identify seven genetic risk loci involved in atopic march

There's a typical "career" for some allergic people, and it starts very early on the skin: babies develop atopic dermatitis, food allergies may follow, then comes asthma and later on hay fever. A group of scientists led by Ingo Marenholz and Young-Ae Lee at the Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine in the Helmholtz Association, working with colleagues from several institutions, has now identified seven genetic risk loci for this course of disease. [More]
Breastfeeding may not protect against allergies

Breastfeeding may not protect against allergies

Pregnant women and new mothers receive many messages regarding the benefits of exclusive breastfeeding for babies in the first year of life. Breastfeeding is thought to reduce the risk of allergic rhinitis (hay fever), asthma, food allergies and eczema in children. [More]
Many seasonal allergy sufferers take OTC products rather prescription medications

Many seasonal allergy sufferers take OTC products rather prescription medications

Anyone suffering with seasonal allergies knows the local pharmacy carries shelves full of over-the-counter medications to help manage symptoms. Unfortunately, most seasonal allergy sufferers take over-the counter (OTC) products rather than the treatments they actually prefer - prescription medications. [More]
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