Head Trauma News and Research RSS Feed - Head Trauma News and Research

Head injury refers to trauma to the head. This may or may not include injury to the brain. However, the terms traumatic brain injury and head injury are often used interchangeably in the medical literature.
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More accurate tests could be created to diagnose memory problems

More accurate tests could be created to diagnose memory problems

UEA research finds hope for more accurate diagnosis of memory problems. More accurate tests could be created to diagnose diseases such as Alzheimer's or memory problems stemming from head injuries, leading to earlier intervention, according to new findings from the University of East Anglia (UEA). [More]
Experts at ABTA conference reveal possible causes, risk factors for brain tumors

Experts at ABTA conference reveal possible causes, risk factors for brain tumors

Today, nearly 700,000 people in the U.S. are living with a brain tumor, and yet, when it comes to pinpointing causes or risk factors, scientists are still searching for answers. [More]
Mayo Clinic calls for safer pediatric imaging

Mayo Clinic calls for safer pediatric imaging

The benefits of medical imaging far outweigh the risks when children receive The Right Exam, ordered The Right Way, with The Right Radiation Dose. However, overuse and misuse of imaging change the benefit-risk ratio and Mayo Clinic is leading a collaborative effort to ensure a national protocol is put into action. [More]
Headbanging to Motörhead thought to have caused bleeding in the brain

Headbanging to Motörhead thought to have caused bleeding in the brain

A recent report in the Lancet describes the case of a man who developed bleeding in the brain after headbanging at a Motörhead concert. [More]
Response-adaptive randomization approach can boost patients’ participation in medical studies

Response-adaptive randomization approach can boost patients’ participation in medical studies

It's a classic Catch-22: Medical researchers need to figure out if a promising new treatment is truly better than a current one, by randomly assigning half of a group of patients to get each treatment. [More]
Special issue discusses the value of academic technology transfer beyond money

Special issue discusses the value of academic technology transfer beyond money

The current special issue of Technology and Innovation is devoted to articles on both innovations in rural regions and general articles on technology and innovation, including an article from the National Academy of Inventors (NAI) by McDevitt et al. [More]
Study shows similar outcomes between blast and nonblast-related brain injuries

Study shows similar outcomes between blast and nonblast-related brain injuries

Explosions are the most common cause of traumatic brain injuries in veterans returning from Iraq and Afghanistan. A new study shows that military personnel with mild brain trauma related to such blasts had outcomes similar to those with mild brain injury from other causes, according to researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. [More]

Sports-related concussion heals slower than previously known, says study

Scientists at the Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, have shown that analysis of the cerebrospinal fluid after concussion can be used to determine the magnitude of brain injury and to follow its course. [More]
Most men suffered TBI before becoming homeless

Most men suffered TBI before becoming homeless

Almost half of all homeless men who took part in a study by St. Michael's Hospital had suffered at least one traumatic brain injury in their life and 87 per cent of those injuries occurred before the men lost their homes. [More]
Drug used to treat hypertension prevents post-traumatic epilepsy in rodent model

Drug used to treat hypertension prevents post-traumatic epilepsy in rodent model

Between 10 and 20 percent of all cases of epilepsy result from severe head injury, but a new drug promises to prevent post-traumatic seizures and may forestall further brain damage caused by seizures in those who already have epilepsy. [More]
Research sheds new light onto possible causes of sudden infant death syndrome

Research sheds new light onto possible causes of sudden infant death syndrome

Research at the University of Adelaide has shed new light onto the possible causes of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), which could help to prevent future loss of children's lives. [More]

Research: Child's relationships may be hidden casualty long after head injury

New research has found that a child's relationships may be a hidden casualty long after a head injury. Neuroscientists at Brigham Young University studied a group of children three years after each had suffered a traumatic brain injury - most commonly from car accidents. The researchers found that lingering injury in a specific region of the brain predicted the health of the children's social lives. [More]
Experts in brain and spinal cord injuries to discuss treatment approaches at 23rd Annual Meeting of AMSSM

Experts in brain and spinal cord injuries to discuss treatment approaches at 23rd Annual Meeting of AMSSM

Post-concussion syndrome (PCS) and spinal cord injuries are complex problems that can present with a variety of symptoms or sequelae. [More]
Homeless people who have suffered TBI are more likely to visit Emergency Department

Homeless people who have suffered TBI are more likely to visit Emergency Department

Homeless and vulnerably housed people who have suffered a traumatic brain injury at some point in their life are more likely to visit an Emergency Department, be arrested or incarcerated, or be victims of physical assault, new research has found. [More]
Sea lions exposed to toxin in algae develop form of epilepsy that is similar to humans

Sea lions exposed to toxin in algae develop form of epilepsy that is similar to humans

California sea lions exposed to a toxin in algae develop a form of epilepsy that is similar to one in humans, according to a new study led by Stanford University School of Medicine researchers. [More]
Damage to brain cells plays role in development of epilepsy after traumatic brain injury

Damage to brain cells plays role in development of epilepsy after traumatic brain injury

Traumatic brain injury is a risk factor for epilepsy, though the relationship is not understood. A new study in mice, published in Cerebral Cortex, identifies increased levels of a specific neurotransmitter as a contributing factor connecting traumatic brain injury (TBI) to post-traumatic epilepsy. The findings suggest that damage to brain cells called interneurons disrupts neurotransmitter levels and plays a role in the development of epilepsy after a traumatic brain injury. [More]
Monell Center announces advocacy program to identify biological causes of smell loss

Monell Center announces advocacy program to identify biological causes of smell loss

On Anosmia Awareness Day, the Monell Center announces "A Sense of Hope: The Monell Anosmia Project," a three-year $1.5M fundraising campaign to support a research and advocacy program focused on anosmia, the loss of the sense of smell. [More]
Blast exposure may cause brain damage even without symptoms of TBI

Blast exposure may cause brain damage even without symptoms of TBI

Veterans exposed to explosions who do not report symptoms of traumatic brain injury (TBI) may still have damage to the brain's white matter comparable to veterans with TBI, according to researchers at Duke Medicine and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. [More]

Positive correlation between white matter quality and addition and multiplication proficiency

A new study led by Professor Bert De Smedt (Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences, KU Leuven) has found that healthy 12-year-olds who score well in addition and multiplication have higher-quality white matter tracts. [More]
Loyola University neuropsychologist find little evidence that chronic traumatic encephalopathy actually exists

Loyola University neuropsychologist find little evidence that chronic traumatic encephalopathy actually exists

The media have widely reported that a debilitating neurological condition called chronic traumatic encephalopathy is a well-established disease in retired athletes who played football and other contact sports. [More]