Health Disparities News and Research RSS Feed - Health Disparities News and Research

Health disparities (also called healthcare inequality in some countries) refer to gaps in the quality of health and health care across racial, ethnic, sexual orientation and socioeconomic groups.
Novel project to develop new models of care for depression in older adults

Novel project to develop new models of care for depression in older adults

UC Davis and the University of Washington are implementing a project to develop innovative new models of care for depression in older adults through a $2.5 million grant from the California-based Archstone Foundation, a private grant-making organization whose mission is to contribute toward the preparation of society in meeting the needs of an aging population. [More]
Experts to share innovative approaches to improve kidney health at ASN Kidney Week 2014

Experts to share innovative approaches to improve kidney health at ASN Kidney Week 2014

The world's largest gathering of kidney health professionals-Kidney Week 2014-will take place November 11-16 in Philadelphia, PA. The annual meeting of the American Society of Nephrology, Kidney Week will showcase new scientific and clinical advances in nephrology from across the globe. [More]
Viewpoints: New insurers suggest health law success; slow response on Ebola

Viewpoints: New insurers suggest health law success; slow response on Ebola

Before Obamacare launched, conservative outlets warned that the law would collapse as insurers shunned the overpriced, overregulated insurance exchanges. [More]
First nationwide study to examine impact of holistic review across multiple health professions

First nationwide study to examine impact of holistic review across multiple health professions

On September 30, 2014, in Washington, DC, higher education and health leaders will release a report that is the first to examine nationwide the impact and use of holistic review-a university admissions process that assesses an applicant's unique experiences alongside traditional measures of academic achievement such as grades and test scores-for students pursuing careers in the health professions. [More]

Wealthiest older Americans worse off than poorest counterparts in other countries, study finds

The Affordable Care Act - "Obamacare" - was signed into law in 2010 and promised the largest overhaul of the U.S. healthcare system since the 1960s. Designed to provide medical care to uninsured Americans, it has been widely decried as an unwarranted intrusion into the affairs of private businesses and individuals. [More]
Brainwave EEG test could be the key to accurate, precise identification of children with autism

Brainwave EEG test could be the key to accurate, precise identification of children with autism

A new study by researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University suggests that measuring how fast the brain responds to sights and sounds could help in objectively classifying people on the autism spectrum and may help diagnose the condition earlier. [More]
Improvements in NICU nursing care could boost health outcomes for underweight black infants

Improvements in NICU nursing care could boost health outcomes for underweight black infants

The health outcomes and quality of care for underweight black infants could greatly improve with more nurses on staff at hospitals with higher concentrations of black patients, according to a new study co-led by a Rutgers researcher. [More]
Milken Institute SPH to hold Latino Health Disparities Conference on September 25, 2014

Milken Institute SPH to hold Latino Health Disparities Conference on September 25, 2014

Milken Institute School of Public Health (Milken Institute SPH) at the George Washington University will hold a conference on September 25 to highlight the disproportionate health challenges faced by many Latino communities and families--with a focus on possible solutions. [More]
Most prevalent form of discrimination is due to mental illness and homelessness

Most prevalent form of discrimination is due to mental illness and homelessness

Vulnerable populations in ethnically diverse Toronto reported more discrimination by health care workers based on their housing status, mental health or substance abuse issues than race, a new study has found. [More]
Researchers receive $23.8 million from CMS to improve HIV prevention and care

Researchers receive $23.8 million from CMS to improve HIV prevention and care

Researchers at the George Washington University (GW) were awarded a grant estimated to be funded at $23.8 million from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) to study a new model that aims to improve HIV prevention and care while lowering healthcare costs. [More]
Financial hardships identified as potential predictors of health risk behaviors

Financial hardships identified as potential predictors of health risk behaviors

Financial hardship, or feeling that one can't make ends meet, may be more predictive of health risk behaviors than actual income levels for people with low-incomes, finds a recent study in the American Journal of Health Promotion. [More]

Study: Sexual risk behaviors of young Hispanic people vary with degree of acculturation

A new study in the Journal of Adolescent Health finds that the sexual risk behaviors of young Hispanic people living in the U.S. vary considerably with their degree of acculturation (as defined by where they were born and the language they speak). [More]
Researchers call for implementation of taxes and subsidies to improve dietary quality

Researchers call for implementation of taxes and subsidies to improve dietary quality

In a Viewpoint published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association, a team of Boston researchers call for the implementation of taxes and subsidies to improve dietary quality in the United States. [More]

Articles focus on lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender older adults and aging

"Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) Aging: The Role of Gerontological Social Work", a special triple issue from the Journal of Gerontological Social Work is now available for FREE ACCESS all of September 2014. [More]
Researchers develop potential antibody therapy for Sudan ebolavirus

Researchers develop potential antibody therapy for Sudan ebolavirus

Researchers from Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University and other institutions have developed a potential antibody therapy for Sudan ebolavirus (SUDV), one of the two most lethal strains of Ebola. [More]
Race and ethnicity influence outcomes of patients with motor complete SCI

Race and ethnicity influence outcomes of patients with motor complete SCI

Researchers have published a study examining racial and ethnic influences in the outcomes of patients with motor complete spinal cord injury (SCI). The article, "Racial and ethnic disparities in functioning at discharge and follow-up among patients with motor complete SCI," was published online ahead of print on August 2 by the Archives of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation. [More]
Study: Low birth weight may put African American women at higher risk for type 2 diabetes

Study: Low birth weight may put African American women at higher risk for type 2 diabetes

African American women born at a low or very low birth weight may be at a higher risk for developing type 2 diabetes. The findings, which appear in Diabetes Care, may explain in part the higher occurrence of type 2 diabetes in African American populations, which has a high prevalence of low birth weight. [More]
Study links high cortisol in infants with socioeconomic status of mothers during pregnancy

Study links high cortisol in infants with socioeconomic status of mothers during pregnancy

Women who are poor experience higher cortisol levels in pregnancy and give birth to infants with elevated levels of the stress hormone, putting them at greater risk for serious disease later in life, according to a new research from the University of Colorado Denver. [More]
Research highlights influence of neighborhoods on older Mexican-American men's problem drinking

Research highlights influence of neighborhoods on older Mexican-American men's problem drinking

LSU Sociology Professor Samuel Stroope is the lead author of a new study, "Neighborhood Ethnic Composition and Problem Drinking among Older Mexican American Men," that will appear in the Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health. [More]
Researchers awarded $3.3 million NIH grant to study role of genetics in protecting against frailty

Researchers awarded $3.3 million NIH grant to study role of genetics in protecting against frailty

Frailty is a common condition associated with old age, characterized by weight loss, weakness, decreased activity level and reduced mobility, which together increase the risk of injury and death. Yet, not all elderly people become frail; some remain vigorous and robust well into old-age. [More]