Health Disparities News and Research RSS Feed - Health Disparities News and Research

Health disparities (also called healthcare inequality in some countries) refer to gaps in the quality of health and health care across racial, ethnic, sexual orientation and socioeconomic groups.
Evidence-based interventions provide promising strategies for reducing racial, ethnic health disparities

Evidence-based interventions provide promising strategies for reducing racial, ethnic health disparities

Evidence-based interventions at the local and national levels provide promising strategies for reducing racial and ethnic health disparities related to HIV infection rates, immunization coverage, motor vehicle injuries and deaths, and smoking, according to a new report by the CDC's Office of Minority Health and Health Equity. [More]

Study indicates that culture or genetics could be blamed for obesity disparities in women

Racial disparities in obesity rates among the third of U.S. adults considered obese are often blamed on socioeconomic status because of its influence on diet and physical activity, but new findings from the University of Alabama at Birmingham published in Obesity suggest otherwise — particularly for women. [More]

Study analyzes data to assess health disparities of transgender individuals

Transgender individuals are medically underserved and their healthcare needs incompletely understood in part because they represent a subpopulation whose health is rarely monitored by U.S. national surveillance systems. [More]
Depression linked to poor self-management in patients with diabetes

Depression linked to poor self-management in patients with diabetes

Adult patients with diabetes who trust their medical provider and feel included in treatment decisions are significantly more likely to take and maintain a newly prescribed antidepressant medication, according to a new study in the Journal of General Internal Medicine. [More]
UIC receives grant to improve wellness and preventive care for adults with developmental disabilities

UIC receives grant to improve wellness and preventive care for adults with developmental disabilities

The University of Illinois at Chicago has received a five-year, $4.4 million federal grant to find ways to improve wellness and preventive care for adults with developmental disabilities. [More]
New analysis finds less research attention is given to diseases of developing world

New analysis finds less research attention is given to diseases of developing world

Death is not distributed equally around the world. In high-income countries, people typically die in old age of chronic diseases such as cancer or cardiovascular problems. In low-income countries, death comes primarily from infectious and perinatal diseases, and strikes at a young age. [More]
Higher education level linked with decreased fracture incidence among non-white women

Higher education level linked with decreased fracture incidence among non-white women

If you are a middle-aged African-American or Asian woman, your social class may play a significant role in how likely you are to suffer bone fractures, a UCLA-led study suggests. [More]

Mobile phones with tobacco screening guidelines offer cessation counseling

Smartphones and tablets may hold the key to getting more clinicians to screen patients for tobacco use and advise smokers on how to quit. Even though tobacco use is the leading cause of preventable disease and death in the U.S., clinicians often don't ask about smoking during patient exams. [More]
Diabetic Ketoacidosis is disproportionately high among youth

Diabetic Ketoacidosis is disproportionately high among youth

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), a life-threatening but preventable condition, remains an important problem for youth with diabetes and their families. Diabetic ketoacidosis is due to a severe lack of insulin and it is often the presenting symptom of type 1 diabetes. It can also be present at the onset of type 2 diabetes. [More]
Einstein faculty members present recent research at AACR Annual Meeting

Einstein faculty members present recent research at AACR Annual Meeting

From uncovering the role nerve cells play in metastasis to identifying new cancer-causing genes, researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University made notable advances in the understanding and potential treatment of cancer during the past year. [More]
Study highlights importance of stress management, healthy lifestyle habits for people with migraine

Study highlights importance of stress management, healthy lifestyle habits for people with migraine

Migraine sufferers who experienced reduced stress from one day to the next are at significantly increased risk of migraine onset on the subsequent day, according to a new study conducted by researchers at the Montefiore Headache Center and Albert Einstein College of Medicine at Yeshiva University. [More]
NIH awards $28M grant to establish new center for excellence to find treatment for Ebola virus

NIH awards $28M grant to establish new center for excellence to find treatment for Ebola virus

The National Institutes of Health has awarded a five-year, $28 million grant to establish a new center for excellence to find an antibody "cocktail" to fight two types of viruses that cause severe hemorrhagic fever, including the deadly Ebola virus. The project involves researchers from 15 institutions, including Kartik Chandran, Ph.D., and Jonathan Lai, Ph.D., at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University. Einstein will receive approximately $4 million of the total grant. [More]
Playing science-based mobile gaming app for 25 minutes can reduce anxiety

Playing science-based mobile gaming app for 25 minutes can reduce anxiety

Playing a science-based mobile gaming app for 25 minutes can reduce anxiety in stressed individuals, according to research published in Clinical Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. [More]

State highlights: Wash. state cost and quality bills; Okla. privatized Medicaid; Fla. malpractice law overturned

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Researchers to send 48 microbes to International Space Station

Researchers to send 48 microbes to International Space Station

Microbes collected from Northern California and throughout the nation will soon blast into orbit for research and a microgravity growth competition on the International Space Station (ISS). [More]
PCORI to award $7 million contract to Chicago coalition to establish clinical data research network

PCORI to award $7 million contract to Chicago coalition to establish clinical data research network

On December 17, 2013, the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) announced its intention to award an 18-month, $7 million contract to a Chicago area coalition of 20 health and hospital organizations including Loyola University Health System. [More]

Highlights: Calif. retiree health costs rise; more abortion clinic closings in Texas; Wash. insurance bills roadblock

A selection of health policy stories from California, Texas, Washington state, Illinois, Virginia and Georgia. [More]
Research roundup: Health care and prisoners; hospitalized patients' surrogates; suicides in the army

Research roundup: Health care and prisoners; hospitalized patients' surrogates; suicides in the army

As a group, jail-involved individuals, which we define here as people with a history of arrest and jail admission in the recent past, carry a heavy illness burden, with high rates of infectious and chronic disease as well as mental illness and substance use. [More]

Aetna honored with 2014 Innovation in Reducing Health Care Disparities Award

Aetna was honored today by the National Business Group on Health (NBGH) with the 2014 Innovation in Reducing Health Care Disparities Award. Aetna is a three-time recipient of the award that recognizes organizations for their commitment to equality in health care and exceptional support for cultural diversity. [More]
E-cigarettes: New route to conventional smoking and nicotine addiction for teenagers

E-cigarettes: New route to conventional smoking and nicotine addiction for teenagers

E-cigarettes, promoted as a way to quit regular cigarettes, may actually be a new route to conventional smoking and nicotine addiction for teenagers, according to a new UC San Francisco study. [More]