Health Disparities News and Research RSS Feed - Health Disparities News and Research

Health disparities (also called healthcare inequality in some countries) refer to gaps in the quality of health and health care across racial, ethnic, sexual orientation and socioeconomic groups.
Race and ethnicity influence outcomes of patients with motor complete SCI

Race and ethnicity influence outcomes of patients with motor complete SCI

Researchers have published a study examining racial and ethnic influences in the outcomes of patients with motor complete spinal cord injury (SCI). The article, "Racial and ethnic disparities in functioning at discharge and follow-up among patients with motor complete SCI," was published online ahead of print on August 2 by the Archives of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation. [More]
Study: Low birth weight may put African American women at higher risk for type 2 diabetes

Study: Low birth weight may put African American women at higher risk for type 2 diabetes

African American women born at a low or very low birth weight may be at a higher risk for developing type 2 diabetes. The findings, which appear in Diabetes Care, may explain in part the higher occurrence of type 2 diabetes in African American populations, which has a high prevalence of low birth weight. [More]
Study links high cortisol in infants with socioeconomic status of mothers during pregnancy

Study links high cortisol in infants with socioeconomic status of mothers during pregnancy

Women who are poor experience higher cortisol levels in pregnancy and give birth to infants with elevated levels of the stress hormone, putting them at greater risk for serious disease later in life, according to a new research from the University of Colorado Denver. [More]
Research highlights influence of neighborhoods on older Mexican-American men's problem drinking

Research highlights influence of neighborhoods on older Mexican-American men's problem drinking

LSU Sociology Professor Samuel Stroope is the lead author of a new study, "Neighborhood Ethnic Composition and Problem Drinking among Older Mexican American Men," that will appear in the Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health. [More]
Researchers awarded $3.3 million NIH grant to study role of genetics in protecting against frailty

Researchers awarded $3.3 million NIH grant to study role of genetics in protecting against frailty

Frailty is a common condition associated with old age, characterized by weight loss, weakness, decreased activity level and reduced mobility, which together increase the risk of injury and death. Yet, not all elderly people become frail; some remain vigorous and robust well into old-age. [More]
American Journal of Public Health special issue to highlight health disparities among Veterans Affairs

American Journal of Public Health special issue to highlight health disparities among Veterans Affairs

In an online-only, open access special issue of the American Journal of Public Health, researchers investigate issues of health equity, quality and disparities within the Veterans Affairs health care system. [More]

Majority of African American women willing to take part in medical research

If a research survey of African American professional women is any indication, attitudes may be changing towards participation in medical research. [More]
Bacteria that aid in digestion help keep intestinal lining intact

Bacteria that aid in digestion help keep intestinal lining intact

Scientists at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University have found that bacteria that aid in digestion help keep the intestinal lining intact. [More]
Montefiore-Einstein investigators to present new findings from eight abstracts at IFHNOS 2014

Montefiore-Einstein investigators to present new findings from eight abstracts at IFHNOS 2014

Clinicians and researchers from Montefiore Medical Center and the Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University will present new findings from eight abstracts at the International Federation of Head and Neck Oncologic Societies World Congress being held July 26 - July 30 in New York. [More]
Study: Slow walking, memory complaints may predict future dementia

Study: Slow walking, memory complaints may predict future dementia

A study involving nearly 27,000 older adults on five continents found that nearly 1 in 10 met criteria for pre-dementia based on a simple test that measures how fast people walk and whether they have cognitive complaints. [More]
Blacks with depression and diabetes receive inadequate mental health treatment

Blacks with depression and diabetes receive inadequate mental health treatment

A new study in General Hospital Psychiatry confirms that Blacks with depression plus another chronic medical condition, such as Type 2 diabetes or high blood pressure, do not receive adequate mental health treatment. [More]

New innovative set of recommendations to keep older adults safe during future disasters

Drawing on the lessons of Superstorm Sandy, a new report from The New York Academy of Medicine (NYAM), "Resilient Communities: Empowering Older Adults in Disasters and Daily Life," presents an innovative set of recommendations to strengthen and connect formal and informal support systems to keep older adults safe during future disasters. [More]

Newborns' health indicators improve despite economic, health disparities

Something extraordinary is happening to poor pregnant women such as Verret: They're giving birth to healthier babies. While other economic and health disparities have widened, giving way to huge national debates about inequality, pregnant women at the lowest rung of the nation's economic ladder are bucking that trend. [More]
Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine expands support to Médecins Sans Frontières and Save the Children training schemes

Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine expands support to Médecins Sans Frontières and Save the Children training schemes

Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine (LSTM) is expanding its support to the training schemes of two of the UK’s leading aid agencies: Médecins Sans Frontières/Doctors Without Borders (MSF) and Save the Children. LSTM’s expertise will enhance and recognise the Continuous Professional Development (CPD) of both agencies leading to further professionalisation of their frontline staff and improved staff retention rates. [More]
First Edition: July 22, 2014

First Edition: July 22, 2014

Reporting for Kaiser Health News, Susan Jaffe writes: "Medicare officials have allowed patients at dozens of hospitals participating in pilot projects across the country to be exempted from the controversial requirement that limits nursing home coverage to seniors admitted to a hospital for at least three days. [More]
Black women who strongly identified with race more likely to feel anxious in healthcare setting

Black women who strongly identified with race more likely to feel anxious in healthcare setting

A first-of-its-kind study by researchers at USC and Loyola Marymount University (LMU) has found evidence that the persistent health disparities across race may, in part, be related to anxiety about being confronted by negative racial stereotypes while receiving healthcare. [More]
Viewpoints: GOP's 'cynical' lawsuit against Obama; debt crisis is not over

Viewpoints: GOP's 'cynical' lawsuit against Obama; debt crisis is not over

There's not much that Republicans like about the 2010 Affordable Care Act, but one thing they particularly dislike is the requirement that employers with 50 or more full-time workers provide comprehensive health insurance. [More]
Rates of stroke incidence, subsequent death decrease among black and white U.S. adults

Rates of stroke incidence, subsequent death decrease among black and white U.S. adults

In a study that included a large sample of black and white U.S. adults from several communities, rates of stroke incidence and subsequent death decreased from 1987 to 2011, with decreases varying across age-groups, according to a study in the July 16 issue of JAMA. [More]
Baxter International acquires drug candidate developed to treat sickle cell disease

Baxter International acquires drug candidate developed to treat sickle cell disease

A drug candidate developed by researchers at the NIH's National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences and its collaborators to treat sickle cell disease has been acquired by Baxter International's BioScience business. [More]
Viewpoints: Hobby Lobby decision celebrated and panned; gender and religious politics explored

Viewpoints: Hobby Lobby decision celebrated and panned; gender and religious politics explored

In ruling 5 to 4 that "closely held" companies can refuse on religious grounds to include contraceptives in their employees' health plans, the Supreme Court has needlessly interfered with an important provision of the Affordable Care Act. And it has done more than that (7/1). [More]