Health Disparities News and Research RSS Feed - Health Disparities News and Research

Health disparities (also called healthcare inequality in some countries) refer to gaps in the quality of health and health care across racial, ethnic, sexual orientation and socioeconomic groups.
Study finds racial disparities among children with Crohn's disease

Study finds racial disparities among children with Crohn's disease

A study published recently in the IBD Journal found significant differences in hospital readmissions, medication usage, and both medical and surgical complications of children with Crohn's disease related to race. In the study, black children had a 1.5 times higher frequency of hospital readmissions because of Crohn's disease compared to white children. [More]
Trained navigators can help patients overcome inequities in healthcare system

Trained navigators can help patients overcome inequities in healthcare system

Traversing the healthcare system can be daunting for almost anyone. Add in the many obstacles that low-income uninsured populations face, and it becomes tremendously more difficult. But a new Northwestern Medicine study shows that guidance from trained navigators can help patients overcome healthcare inequities. [More]
UTHealth study explores use of app to help improve health of minority stroke patients

UTHealth study explores use of app to help improve health of minority stroke patients

A clinical trial investigating the use of a physician-monitored app to help first-time minority stroke patients become healthier has begun at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. [More]
Einstein researchers find possible clue to why older mothers have babies born with Down syndrome

Einstein researchers find possible clue to why older mothers have babies born with Down syndrome

Researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University have found a possible clue to why older mothers face a higher risk for having babies born with conditions such as Down syndrome that are characterized by abnormal chromosome numbers. [More]
Loyola researchers receive grant to improve health of low-income minorities

Loyola researchers receive grant to improve health of low-income minorities

Loyola University Chicago health sciences researchers have received a $500,000 grant from the George M. Eisenberg Foundation for Charities, based in Arlington Heights, Ill., for a 10-year study to improve the health of low-income minority residents in communities surrounding Loyola's Health Sciences Campus in Maywood. [More]
Centene Foundation for Quality Healthcare awards grants to support MIHS programs

Centene Foundation for Quality Healthcare awards grants to support MIHS programs

The Centene Foundation for Quality Healthcare announced today that it awarded $50,000 in community impact grants to help four programs that support the underserved, including a unique hospital-based domestic violence prevention effort. [More]
Researchers develop novel approach to identify potential antimalarial drugs

Researchers develop novel approach to identify potential antimalarial drugs

Each year nearly 600,000 people--mostly children under age five and pregnant women in sub-Saharan Africa--die from malaria, caused by single-celled parasites that grow inside red blood cells. The most deadly malarial species--Plasmodium falciparum--has proven notoriously resistant to treatment efforts. [More]

Diversity Jobs Report: Healthcare sector offers positive news for diverse professionals seeking employment in US

Today Professional Diversity Network , Inc. releases its monthly Diversity Jobs Report (DJR), which analyzes the employment situation for women, minorities, veterans, LGBT and disabled professionals. [More]
Howard K. Koh receives CADCA's 2015 National Leadership Award

Howard K. Koh receives CADCA's 2015 National Leadership Award

In recognition of his significant contributions to public health and tobacco prevention, and his long-standing support of community-based drug prevention, Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America (CADCA) will present Howard K. Koh M.D., M.P.H. with its 2015 National Leadership Award. [More]
Two genetic mutations can interact to reduce risk for heart attack

Two genetic mutations can interact to reduce risk for heart attack

Researchers have determined that two mutations on a single gene can interact in a way that lowers the carrier's risk for a heart attack. [More]

IOMC receives initial funding to help eliminate health disparities in Chicago's underserved communities

The Institute of Medicine of Chicago (IOMC) has announced the receipt of initial funding to pursue its new initiative designed to help eliminate health disparities in Chicago's underserved communities. [More]
GW Cancer Institute selected to study health disparities in cancer care

GW Cancer Institute selected to study health disparities in cancer care

The George Washington University Cancer Institute received a $97K grant from Genentech to address health disparities in cancer care. [More]
TOSH Program aims to improve oral-systemic health

TOSH Program aims to improve oral-systemic health

Improving oral health is a leading population health goal; however, curricula preparing health professionals have a dearth of oral health content and clinical experiences. Funded by a grant from the Health Resources and Service Administration, New York University College of Nursing's Teaching Oral-Systemic Health Program is working to build interprofessional oral health workforce capacity which addresses a significant public health issue, increases oral health care access, and improves oral-systemic health across the lifespan. [More]

Dental researchers encourage parents to seek dental care for children

Dental researchers hope to vastly improve oral health in children by countering a common misperception that dental care for baby teeth isn't important because they just fall out anyway. [More]
ASCB honors UTSA adjunct professor with E. B. Wilson Medal

ASCB honors UTSA adjunct professor with E. B. Wilson Medal

William Brinkley, adjunct professor of biology in the UTSA College of Sciences, was recently honored with the E. B. Wilson Medal from the American Society for Cell Biology. The medal, the organization's highest honor for far-reaching contributions to cell biology over a lifetime in science, was presented to Brinkley at the 54th Annual Meeting in Philadelphia. [More]
28th Annual Ruth K. Palmer Research Symposium to focus on health inequities

28th Annual Ruth K. Palmer Research Symposium to focus on health inequities

The 28th Annual Ruth K. Palmer Research Symposium will address "Inequities in Health: From Cells to Community." [More]
Shriners Hospitals for Children-Chicago, UI Health to provide specialized pediatric medical services

Shriners Hospitals for Children-Chicago, UI Health to provide specialized pediatric medical services

Shriners Hospitals for Children-Chicago and the University of Illinois Hospital & Health Sciences System have signed an affiliation agreement to enhance their existing partnership and provide expanded pediatric specialty medical services to their patients. [More]
Researchers explore lifespan variability between races

Researchers explore lifespan variability between races

Eliminating health disparities between races is a goal of many groups and organizations, but a team of sociologists suggests that finding the reasons for the differences in the timing of black and white deaths may be trickier than once thought. [More]
GHC, DSM highlight the growing issue of micronutrient deficiency in the U.S.

GHC, DSM highlight the growing issue of micronutrient deficiency in the U.S.

Global Health Corps and DSM called attention to the growing issue of micronutrient deficiency in the U.S. in a press conference with Barbara Bush, CEO of GHC, Hugh Welsh, President of DSM North America, Newark Municipal Council President Mildred Crump and Jim White, Executive Director of Covenant House New Jersey. [More]
Sleep-related breathing problems, lack of sleep may increase risk of childhood obesity

Sleep-related breathing problems, lack of sleep may increase risk of childhood obesity

Sleep-related breathing problems and chronic lack of sleep may each double the risk of a child becoming obese by age 15, according to new research from Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University. The good news is that both sleep problems can be corrected. [More]