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Health disparities (also called healthcare inequality in some countries) refer to gaps in the quality of health and health care across racial, ethnic, sexual orientation and socioeconomic groups.
amfAR releases recommendations to help U.S. states to achieve goals of National HIV/AIDS Strategy

amfAR releases recommendations to help U.S. states to achieve goals of National HIV/AIDS Strategy

Major achievements have been made in the domestic HIV/AIDS response as a result of increased realignment and coordination of efforts at the federal level. However, that level of consistent coordination and alignment has yet to take place in most states. In an effort to identify what needs to be done, amfAR, The Foundation for AIDS Research, in collaboration with the National HIV/AIDS Initiative at the O'Neill Institute for National and Global Health Law at Georgetown Law, has released a set of recommendations for how states across the U.S. can improve HIV prevention and care outcomes in an effort to achieve the goals identified within the National HIV/AIDS Strategy. [More]
Innovative course helps make medical students more confident about dealing with health disparities

Innovative course helps make medical students more confident about dealing with health disparities

An innovative three-month elective course has helped make some first-year medical students at Albert Einstein College of Medicine more confident about dealing with health disparities they'll likely encounter as physicians, according to a follow-up study published online today in the journal Academic Medicine. [More]
Moffitt researchers find cancer healthcare disparities in LGBTQ community

Moffitt researchers find cancer healthcare disparities in LGBTQ community

The Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender/Transsexual, Queer/Questioning (LGBTQ) community is a growing and medically-underserved minority population in the United States, with 3 to 12 percent of the population estimated to identify as LGBTQ. [More]
Global efforts help improve quality of nursing home care for racial, ethnic minority residents

Global efforts help improve quality of nursing home care for racial, ethnic minority residents

A new study of nursing homes has found that, while disparities continue to exist, the quality of care in homes with higher concentrations of racial and ethnic minority residents has improved and that this progress appears to be linked to increases in Medicaid payments. [More]
Georgia State and Morehouse partner to reduce diabetes, cardiovascular disease rates in southwest Atlanta

Georgia State and Morehouse partner to reduce diabetes, cardiovascular disease rates in southwest Atlanta

The School of Public Health at Georgia State University has received nearly $400,000 in grant funds to support a three-year effort to reduce rates of diabetes and cardiovascular disease in African-American neighborhoods in southwest Atlanta. [More]
Study: Around 6% survive cardiac arrest outside of hospital setting

Study: Around 6% survive cardiac arrest outside of hospital setting

Cardiac arrest strikes almost 600,000 people each year, killing the vast majority of those individuals, says a new report from the Institute of Medicine. Every year in the U.S., approximately 395,000 cases of cardiac arrest occur outside of a hospital setting, in which less than 6 percent survive. Approximately 200,000 cardiac arrests occur each year in hospitals, and 24 percent of those patients survive. Estimates suggest that cardiac arrest is the third leading cause of death in the U.S. behind cancer and heart disease. [More]
Study shows wide geographic variation in use of 'clotbuster' for stroke treatment

Study shows wide geographic variation in use of 'clotbuster' for stroke treatment

It looks like a crazy quilt spread over the continent. But a new map of emergency stroke care in America shows just how much of a patchwork system we still have for delivering the most effective stroke treatment. [More]
Chronic disease, mental health issues affect low-income African-Americans, Latinos and Hispanics

Chronic disease, mental health issues affect low-income African-Americans, Latinos and Hispanics

Chronic disease and mental health issues disproportionately affect low-income African-Americans, Latinos and Hispanics, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Two new studies by the UCLA Center for Culture, Trauma and Mental Health Disparities shed light on the causes and impacts of this disparity. [More]
Studies compare self-reported health between unemployed and working populations

Studies compare self-reported health between unemployed and working populations

In an international context, Norway stands as an egalitarian country with only small class and income disparities, in which everyone basically has equal access to universal health care. [More]
Questionnaire predicts chances of middle-aged people living until 2020

Questionnaire predicts chances of middle-aged people living until 2020

People aged between 40 and 70 years can now answer a set of simple questions to calculate their personalised 5-year mortality risk and what is referred to as an “Ubble age” – the age where the average mortality risk in the population is most similar to the estimated risk... [More]
New study shows average New Yorker sits more than seven hours a day

New study shows average New Yorker sits more than seven hours a day

The Big Apple is one of the most walkable cities in the nation, providing many opportunities for physical activity, and New Yorkers are more likely to exercise regularly than the average U.S. adult. But they are also sitting far more than what is considered healthy. [More]
Racial socialization in early childhood may increase child's ability to excel in school

Racial socialization in early childhood may increase child's ability to excel in school

A child's ability to succeed academically is one of the strongest determinants of his or her future quality of life. In particular, it has been directly linked to overall longevity and several other critical health outcomes. [More]
UM researcher receives grant to examine effects of CBT on racial/ethnic minority smokers

UM researcher receives grant to examine effects of CBT on racial/ethnic minority smokers

Numerous studies have shown that African Americans and Hispanics are less likely than Caucasians to quit smoking, even if they participate in cessation interventions. [More]
Scientists identify molecular 'lock' that enables Ebola virus to gain entry to cells

Scientists identify molecular 'lock' that enables Ebola virus to gain entry to cells

An international team including scientists from Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University and the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases has identified the molecular "lock" that the deadly Ebola virus must pick to gain entry to cells. [More]
CWRU's Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing receives grant to study multiple chronic conditions

CWRU's Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing receives grant to study multiple chronic conditions

Case Western Reserve University's Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing will begin training predoctoral and postdoctoral researchers to study people with multiple chronic illnesses in hopes of discovering better methods for managing such a complex combination of illnesses. [More]
Shiftworkers more likely to develop metabolic disorders

Shiftworkers more likely to develop metabolic disorders

Shiftwork is an occupational health risk of growing significance because it is becoming more common and because of its potential influence on health outcomes, possibly increasing health differences between workers of higher vs lower socioeconomic status. [More]
Misperceptions about miscarriage are widespread, survey finds

Misperceptions about miscarriage are widespread, survey finds

A survey of more than 1,000 U.S. adults has found that misperceptions about miscarriage and its causes are widespread. Results of the survey, conducted by researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University and Montefiore Health System, show that feelings of guilt and shame are common after a miscarriage and that most people erroneously believe that miscarriages are rare. [More]
Montefiore and Einstein researchers to present data on obesity, asthma and autism at PAS 2015

Montefiore and Einstein researchers to present data on obesity, asthma and autism at PAS 2015

Researchers from the Children's Hospital at Montefiore and Albert Einstein College of Medicine will present data from more than 50 studies that explore topics including obesity, asthma and autism at the annual meeting of the Pediatric Academic Societies. [More]
New Northwestern Medicine study shows that patient portals could widen gap in health disparities

New Northwestern Medicine study shows that patient portals could widen gap in health disparities

Online sites that offer secure access to one's medical record, often referred to as patient portals, are increasingly important for doctor and patient communication and routine access to health care information. But patient portals could widen the gap in health disparities among the most vulnerable patients, according to a new Northwestern Medicine study. [More]
Preventive intervention improves knowledge, attitudes about sexual risk among adolescent boys than girls

Preventive intervention improves knowledge, attitudes about sexual risk among adolescent boys than girls

Boys aged between 12-14 years old showed improved knowledge and attitudes about sexual risk after a preventive intervention, compared to girls of the same age, according to a study presented yesterday at the Pediatric Academic Societies Annual Meeting. [More]
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