Health Disparities News and Research RSS Feed - Health Disparities News and Research

Health disparities (also called healthcare inequality in some countries) refer to gaps in the quality of health and health care across racial, ethnic, sexual orientation and socioeconomic groups.
Lack of female clinicians may influence muslim women to delay or forgo medical care

Lack of female clinicians may influence muslim women to delay or forgo medical care

A new study of American Muslim women from diverse ethnic and racial backgrounds found that the majority of women had delayed seeking medical care due to a perceived lack of female clinicians. [More]
Research shows how breastfeeding rates differ among white, black and Hispanic mothers

Research shows how breastfeeding rates differ among white, black and Hispanic mothers

Chapman University has published research on how breastfeeding rates differ among white, black and Hispanic mothers. [More]
New home-based intervention aims to improve health outcomes of children of South Asian immigrants

New home-based intervention aims to improve health outcomes of children of South Asian immigrants

More than one-third of Bronx residents are born outside of the United States. Often separated from family, challenged by language barriers, unfamiliar with health resources, and burdened by poverty, they are at high risk for health problems. And these risks extend to their young children. [More]
Group intervention may be effective in improving overall health of aging lesbian, bisexual women

Group intervention may be effective in improving overall health of aging lesbian, bisexual women

The Bay Area has long been one of the nation's leading advocates for LGBT equality and community support. Recent studies, however, reveal that one population -- aging lesbian and bisexual women -- are overlooked in the realm of health care and the promotion of healthy lifestyle choices tailored to their needs. [More]
BU researcher receives grant to better understand breast cancer in African-American women

BU researcher receives grant to better understand breast cancer in African-American women

Why do African-American women die at a higher rate and experience more aggressive breast tumors than white women? Researchers from Boston University's Slone Epidemiology Center (SEC) have received funding from the National Cancer Institute to explore this question. [More]
Study finds delayed onset of illness for centenarians than younger counterparts

Study finds delayed onset of illness for centenarians than younger counterparts

Research has shown that the human lifespan has the potential to be extended. But would this merely mean people living longer in poor health? The upbeat findings from a new study in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society indicate that those extra years could well be healthy ones [More]
Global summit aims to develop sustainable network to support nursing and midwifery clinical research

Global summit aims to develop sustainable network to support nursing and midwifery clinical research

On July 18-19, 2016, Columbia Global Centers | Amman and Columbia University School of Nursing will host the Global Nursing and Midwifery Clinical Research Development Initiative in Amman, Jordan. [More]
Discrimination linked to heavy and hazardous drinking

Discrimination linked to heavy and hazardous drinking

In the late 1980s, researchers across the United States began reporting a link between discrimination against African Americans and poor cardiovascular health within the African American population. [More]
Unwelcoming healthcare environments may affect cervical cancer screening among LGBT people

Unwelcoming healthcare environments may affect cervical cancer screening among LGBT people

A new study found that certain factors affect cervical cancer screening among lesbian and bisexual women and transgender men. Some of these factors overlap with the general female population, whereas others are specific to the lesbian, bisexual, or queer identity. [More]
LGB adults experience higher rates of distress, impaired physical health than heterosexuals

LGB adults experience higher rates of distress, impaired physical health than heterosexuals

In one of the largest, most representative health surveys conducted to date, lesbian, gay and bisexual adults reported substantially higher rates of severe psychological distress, heavy drinking and smoking, and impaired physical health than did heterosexuals. [More]
Media-awareness campaign aims to reduce binge drinking among ethnic-minority emerging adults

Media-awareness campaign aims to reduce binge drinking among ethnic-minority emerging adults

Health-promotion and disease-prevention efforts can no longer use a one-size-fits-all approach. Efforts targeting emerging adult populations - encompassing late adolescence and early adulthood - must embrace and utilize multi-pronged, multi-media approaches in order to be successful. [More]
NIH funds novel substance abuse treatment program that targets marginalized populations

NIH funds novel substance abuse treatment program that targets marginalized populations

The creators of a novel substance abuse treatment program have received an infusion of funding from a federal agency for an expanded study of their intervention, which targets marginalized populations who struggle with problems such as racism, sexism, poverty and histories of incarceration. [More]
Study helps identify traits that may cause elders to need help with medications

Study helps identify traits that may cause elders to need help with medications

As age increases, older adults can develop problems taking their medications. But until now, few studies have examined the traits that might cause elders to need help with their medications, or how widespread a problem this might be. [More]
Patient navigators could help improve comprehensive cancer screening rates among low-income, ethnic minorities

Patient navigators could help improve comprehensive cancer screening rates among low-income, ethnic minorities

A clinical trial conducted by Massachusetts General Hospital investigators has found that the use of patient navigators - individuals who assist patients in receiving health care services - may improve comprehensive cancer screening rates among patient populations not likely to receive recommended screenings. [More]
Black children more likely to have postsurgical complications after urologic surgery

Black children more likely to have postsurgical complications after urologic surgery

Black children who undergo urologic surgery are more likely than white children to have postsurgical complications and hospital-acquired infections 30 days after the surgery. [More]

Alcohol-sleep relationship may vary by race and sex, study finds

A new study found that alcohol-sleep relationship differed importantly by race and sex. [More]
Surgeons take first step towards eliminating surgical care disparities

Surgeons take first step towards eliminating surgical care disparities

Surgeons and researchers, responding to the known prevalence of inequalities in U.S. surgical care, have taken the first steps toward eliminating surgical care disparities by grouping their causes into themes and identifying modifiable contributing factors. [More]
U.S. study shows adults with diabetes born in 1940s living longer with less disability

U.S. study shows adults with diabetes born in 1940s living longer with less disability

Older Americans with diabetes born in the 1940s are living longer and with less disability performing day to day tasks than those born 10 years earlier, according to new research published in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology journal. [More]
Advanced imaging technique helps predict recovery in concussion patients

Advanced imaging technique helps predict recovery in concussion patients

Using an advanced imaging technique, researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Montefiore Health System were able to predict which patients who'd recently suffered concussions were likely to fully recover. [More]
Study finds positive support from all racial/ethnic groups for physician-assisted death

Study finds positive support from all racial/ethnic groups for physician-assisted death

Physician-assisted death was supported by a majority of California and Hawaii residents, regardless of their ethnicity, who responded to an online survey, according to a study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine. [More]
Advertisement