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Access to health insurance can increase social cohesion in communities, study shows

Access to health insurance can increase social cohesion in communities, study shows

A new study shows that access to health insurance can help hold a community together socially, and lack of it can contribute to the fraying of neighborhood cohesion. [More]
Princeton University researchers find disparity in hospital admission rates for publicly insured children

Princeton University researchers find disparity in hospital admission rates for publicly insured children

Hospitals are less likely to admit children covered by public insurance such as Medicaid than privately insured children with similar symptoms, especially when hospitals beds are scarce. [More]
Johns Hopkins researchers identify barriers to young men's sexual and reproductive health

Johns Hopkins researchers identify barriers to young men's sexual and reproductive health

Johns Hopkins researchers who conducted a dozen focus groups with 70 straight and gay/bisexual Hispanic and African-American males ages 15 to 24 report that gaining a better understanding of the context in which young men grow up will allow health care providers to improve this population's use of sexual and reproductive health care. [More]
HUB and Dutch health insurance companies to test use of organoid technology for CF treatment

HUB and Dutch health insurance companies to test use of organoid technology for CF treatment

Hubrecht Organoid Technology (HUB), and the health insurance companies CZ, Zilveren Kruis, and Menzis announced today that they will start a €3 million validation trial for use of HUB Organoid Technology to test if it can be used to determine the response of Cystic Fibrosis (CF) patients to new drug therapies. [More]
Bundled payment models can reduce Medicare, hospital costs without compromising quality of care

Bundled payment models can reduce Medicare, hospital costs without compromising quality of care

Bundled payment models can push Medicare and health system costs down considerably without sacrificing quality of care, according to new research from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. [More]
Study reports volume and cost of in-home care for children with special medical conditions

Study reports volume and cost of in-home care for children with special medical conditions

U.S. families provide nearly $36 billion annually in uncompensated medical care at home to children who have special health care needs, such as muscular dystrophy and cystic fibrosis, according to a large national study. [More]
Military health system to test U-M-developed V-BID approach

Military health system to test U-M-developed V-BID approach

A health care reform idea originated by University of Michigan faculty will get a major test among members of the nation's military and their families, thanks to a provision in the national defense spending bill signed by President Obama on Friday. [More]
Cost of treatment leaves cancer patients in debt

Cost of treatment leaves cancer patients in debt

Cancer patients are ending up in debt because they have to cover the costs of treatment as well as other care related expenses, researchers report at the ESMO Asia 2016 Congress in Singapore. [More]
Families are probably not financially burdened by their childrens' Down Syndrome medical care

Families are probably not financially burdened by their childrens' Down Syndrome medical care

The first study to analyze the out-of-pocket costs to families for the medical care of children and adolescents with Down syndrome finds that monthly costs - averaged over the first 18 years of life - are less than $100 a month more than the costs for care of a typically developing child. The report published in American Journal of Medical Genetics, Part A also finds that the additional costs are lower when the child is older. [More]
Many U.S. children do not receive evidence-based care for obesity despite USPSTF recommendations

Many U.S. children do not receive evidence-based care for obesity despite USPSTF recommendations

Six years following the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendation that clinicians screen and treat (or refer) children age six and older for obesity, most U.S. children still do not receive evidence-based care for obesity. [More]
Cost effective moisturizers could help prevent eczema in high-risk newborns

Cost effective moisturizers could help prevent eczema in high-risk newborns

What if it was possible to prevent your child from getting eczema -- a costly, inflammatory skin disorder -- just by applying something as inexpensive as petroleum jelly every day for the first six months of his or her life? [More]
Latina women with breast cancer likely to experience many gaps in survivorship care, research suggests

Latina women with breast cancer likely to experience many gaps in survivorship care, research suggests

Breast cancer patients in one of the United States' largest and fastest-growing ethnic minority groups are likely to experience numerous gaps in care following their primary treatment, research from Oregon State University suggests. [More]
Study finds upward trend in stroke rates among younger generations

Study finds upward trend in stroke rates among younger generations

Older baby boomers—those born between 1945 and 1954—can proudly boast a new label: the "stroke-healthiest generation," according to a Rutgers study that found the lowest incidence of ischemic stroke in this age group within the past 20 years. [More]
Brazil makes progress in reducing gap in health status, but inequalities persist

Brazil makes progress in reducing gap in health status, but inequalities persist

Brazil, through a combination of public policies and its Unified Health System, has significantly improved access to medical care for a wide swath of its population, but more can be done to eradicate health inequalities there, according to a special edition of the International Journal for Equity in Health. [More]

Public's health insurance and financial literacy linked to higher levels of coverage

Uninsured individuals who had greater knowledge about health insurance and financial issues were more likely to gain coverage after health insurance exchanges opened under the federal Affordable Care Act, according to a new RAND Corporation study. [More]
Hog workers carrying livestock-related, drug-resistant bacteria may be developing skin infections

Hog workers carrying livestock-related, drug-resistant bacteria may be developing skin infections

New Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health-led research suggests that some workers at industrial hog production facilities are not only carrying livestock-associated, antibiotic-resistant bacteria in their noses, but may also be developing skin infections from these bacteria. [More]
Study compares reach of quitlines to number of tobacco users for different racial/ethnic groups

Study compares reach of quitlines to number of tobacco users for different racial/ethnic groups

Quitlines, hotlines that provide free cessation services for smokers, appear to be reaching minority populations that typically underutilize cessation treatments and have high smoking prevalence, particularly African Americans and American Indians/Alaska Natives. [More]
New research finds increasing prevalence of clinical depression among adolescents

New research finds increasing prevalence of clinical depression among adolescents

The rate of adolescents reporting a recent bout of clinical depression grew by 37 percent over the decade ending in 2014, with one in six girls reporting an episode in the past year, new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health-led research suggests. [More]
New software and 3D printers may enable cost-effective production of insoles for diabetes patients

New software and 3D printers may enable cost-effective production of insoles for diabetes patients

In the past, insoles for patients with diabetes were hand-made by orthopedic shoemakers. In the future, these specialist shoemakers will be able to produce insoles more cost-effectively thanks to new software and the use of 3D printers. [More]
Six pioneering French companies to exhibit in innovation zone at Medica 2016

Six pioneering French companies to exhibit in innovation zone at Medica 2016

In a global market worth almost €200 billion (around £173 billion) a year, the medical devices and in vitro diagnostics sector is particularly innovative in France. Across the Channel, the sector is comprised of over a thousand companies, employing almost 65,000 people with expertise encompassing medicine, mechanics, material physics and digital technologies. [More]
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