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Allergen chip helps early detection of allergies

Allergen chip helps early detection of allergies

People can become allergically sensitized straight from birth. "Early screening is therefore important to detect allergies early so that steps can be taken to prevent serious forms of illness developing," say the MedUni Vienna allergy researchers, speaking on the occasion of World Immunology Day on 29 April and the current WHO World Immunization Week. [More]
Expanded Medicaid coverage shows increase in health insurance rates among low-income adults

Expanded Medicaid coverage shows increase in health insurance rates among low-income adults

Researchers at UCLA have that found states that expanded Medicaid coverage under the Affordable Care Act saw a significant increase in rates of health insurance among low-income adults compared with states that did not expand the program. [More]
False-positive mammogram results may have varied effects on subsequent screening behavior of women

False-positive mammogram results may have varied effects on subsequent screening behavior of women

Depending on when they received their last mammogram, women who receive a false-positive result are more or less likely to get screened at recommended intervals, according to preliminary findings from a University of North Carolina Comprehensive Cancer Center study. [More]
Developing countries face health financing crisis due to low domestic investment, stagnating international aid

Developing countries face health financing crisis due to low domestic investment, stagnating international aid

Two major studies published in The Lancet reveal the health financing crisis facing developing countries as a result of low domestic investment and stagnating international aid, which could leave millions of people without access to even the most basic health services. [More]
Marriage may help prolong survival in cancer patients

Marriage may help prolong survival in cancer patients

New research has uncovered a link between being married and living longer among cancer patients, with the beneficial effect of marriage differing by race/ethnicity and place of birth. Published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the findings have important public health implications, given the rising numbers of unmarried individuals in the United States in addition to the growing aging population. [More]
Study links cancer survivorship to marriage, birthplace, race and ethnicity

Study links cancer survivorship to marriage, birthplace, race and ethnicity

Previous studies have shown that married patients with cancer fare better than unmarried cancer patients, surviving more often and longer. In a new study, published April 11 in the journal Cancer, researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine report that the benefits of being married vary by race and ethnicity, with male non-Hispanic white bachelors experiencing the worst outcome. This group had a 24 percent higher mortality rate than their married counterparts. [More]
Promotora visits increase breast cancer screening among Latina women

Promotora visits increase breast cancer screening among Latina women

Latina women were nearly twice as likely to be screened for breast cancer after they were visited in their homes by trained community health workers, known as Promotoras, according to a study published in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention. [More]
Health inequities become a persistent challenge as world’s urban population continues to grow

Health inequities become a persistent challenge as world’s urban population continues to grow

New data on the health of city-dwellers in almost 100 countries show that as the world’s urban population continues to grow, health inequities - especially between the richest and poorest urban populations - are a persistent challenge, according to a report by the World Health Organization and the United Nations Human Settlements Programme. [More]
Endocrine Society issues recommendations to improve care for people with diabetes

Endocrine Society issues recommendations to improve care for people with diabetes

To provide integrated care for people who have diabetes and may be at risk of developing related medical complications, the U.S. health care system needs to continue building effective multidisciplinary care team models, according to new recommendations issued by the Endocrine Society today. [More]
Crash risk higher among truck drivers not adhering to sleep apnea treatment

Crash risk higher among truck drivers not adhering to sleep apnea treatment

Truck drivers who have obstructive sleep apnea and who do not attempt to adhere to a mandated treatment program have a fivefold increase in the risk of a severe crash, according to a new study co-authored by Virginia Tech Transportation Institute researchers and featured in the March 21 online edition of the journal Sleep. [More]
Indego exoskeleton receives FDA certification for U.S. use

Indego exoskeleton receives FDA certification for U.S. use

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has given clearance to market and sell the powered lower-limb exoskeleton created by a team of Vanderbilt engineers and commercialized by the Parker Hannifin Corporation for both clinical and personal use in the United States. [More]
High coronary artery calcium score puts people at greater risk for cancer, kidney disease and COPD

High coronary artery calcium score puts people at greater risk for cancer, kidney disease and COPD

A 10-year follow-up study of more than 6,000 people who underwent heart CT scans suggests that a high coronary artery calcium score puts people at greater risk not only for heart and vascular disease but also for cancer, chronic kidney disease and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). [More]
Study: 40% of U.S. infants from low-income families do not receive rotavirus vaccination

Study: 40% of U.S. infants from low-income families do not receive rotavirus vaccination

Rotavirus (RV) infection is the leading cause of diarrheal disease in young children worldwide, causing more than half a million deaths of children aged <5 years annually, according to the World Health Organization. There are two safe and effective RV vaccines, pentavalent Rotateq (Merck) and monovalent Rotarix (GSK), yet global coverage remains below 20% of children. [More]
New recommendations call for creating novel approach to health care

New recommendations call for creating novel approach to health care

Researchers at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, along with experts from across the country, have developed a set of policy recommendations that would improve the quality of behavioral health care patients receive in clinical settings. [More]
Research: Nearly half of children in the U.S. live close to poverty line

Research: Nearly half of children in the U.S. live close to poverty line

Nearly half of children in the United States live dangerously close to the poverty line, according to new research from the National Center for Children in Poverty (NCCP) at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health. [More]
Black men have higher rate and probability of PSA screening compared to non-Hispanic whites

Black men have higher rate and probability of PSA screening compared to non-Hispanic whites

African American men have the highest rate of prostate cancer and shorter survival time compared to other racial/ethnic groups in the U.S. Their mortality rate is more than twice that of their white counterparts. Early diagnosis through PSA screening may help forestall consequent morbidity and mortality. [More]

Chubb named top 2015 New-Product Pacesetter by Advisen for contributions in product innovation

Chubb has been named the top 2015 New-Product Pacesetter by Advisen, an insurance news source for the insurance industry, for its contributions in product innovation. [More]
New definitions and clinical criteria for sepsis, septic shock

New definitions and clinical criteria for sepsis, septic shock

Clifford S. Deutschman, MS, MD, vice chair of research in the Department of Pediatrics at Cohen Children's Medical Center and an investigator at The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research , presented new definitions and clinical criteria for sepsis and septic shock at the Society of Critical Care Medicine's 45th Critical Care Congress in Orlando, FL. [More]
Majority of LAHNC patients rely on lifestyle-altering cost-coping strategies to manage treatment

Majority of LAHNC patients rely on lifestyle-altering cost-coping strategies to manage treatment

The majority of patients with locally advanced head and neck cancers (LAHNC) rely on cost-coping strategies that alter their lifestyle in order to manage the financial burden of their care, according to research presented at the 2016 Multidisciplinary Head and Neck Cancer Symposium. [More]
Uninsured and Medicaid patients have higher overall and cancer-specific mortality rates

Uninsured and Medicaid patients have higher overall and cancer-specific mortality rates

Compared to patients with non-Medicaid insurance, uninsured patients and patients with Medicaid are more likely to present with advanced stages of head and neck cancer and have higher overall and cancer-specific mortality rates, according to research presented at the 2016 Multidisciplinary Head and Neck Cancer Symposium. [More]
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