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Indego exoskeleton receives FDA certification for U.S. use

Indego exoskeleton receives FDA certification for U.S. use

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has given clearance to market and sell the powered lower-limb exoskeleton created by a team of Vanderbilt engineers and commercialized by the Parker Hannifin Corporation for both clinical and personal use in the United States. [More]
High coronary artery calcium score puts people at greater risk for cancer, kidney disease and COPD

High coronary artery calcium score puts people at greater risk for cancer, kidney disease and COPD

A 10-year follow-up study of more than 6,000 people who underwent heart CT scans suggests that a high coronary artery calcium score puts people at greater risk not only for heart and vascular disease but also for cancer, chronic kidney disease and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). [More]
Study: 40% of U.S. infants from low-income families do not receive rotavirus vaccination

Study: 40% of U.S. infants from low-income families do not receive rotavirus vaccination

Rotavirus (RV) infection is the leading cause of diarrheal disease in young children worldwide, causing more than half a million deaths of children aged <5 years annually, according to the World Health Organization. There are two safe and effective RV vaccines, pentavalent Rotateq (Merck) and monovalent Rotarix (GSK), yet global coverage remains below 20% of children. [More]
New recommendations call for creating novel approach to health care

New recommendations call for creating novel approach to health care

Researchers at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, along with experts from across the country, have developed a set of policy recommendations that would improve the quality of behavioral health care patients receive in clinical settings. [More]
Research: Nearly half of children in the U.S. live close to poverty line

Research: Nearly half of children in the U.S. live close to poverty line

Nearly half of children in the United States live dangerously close to the poverty line, according to new research from the National Center for Children in Poverty (NCCP) at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health. [More]
Black men have higher rate and probability of PSA screening compared to non-Hispanic whites

Black men have higher rate and probability of PSA screening compared to non-Hispanic whites

African American men have the highest rate of prostate cancer and shorter survival time compared to other racial/ethnic groups in the U.S. Their mortality rate is more than twice that of their white counterparts. Early diagnosis through PSA screening may help forestall consequent morbidity and mortality. [More]

Chubb named top 2015 New-Product Pacesetter by Advisen for contributions in product innovation

Chubb has been named the top 2015 New-Product Pacesetter by Advisen, an insurance news source for the insurance industry, for its contributions in product innovation. [More]
New definitions and clinical criteria for sepsis, septic shock

New definitions and clinical criteria for sepsis, septic shock

Clifford S. Deutschman, MS, MD, vice chair of research in the Department of Pediatrics at Cohen Children's Medical Center and an investigator at The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research , presented new definitions and clinical criteria for sepsis and septic shock at the Society of Critical Care Medicine's 45th Critical Care Congress in Orlando, FL. [More]
Majority of LAHNC patients rely on lifestyle-altering cost-coping strategies to manage treatment

Majority of LAHNC patients rely on lifestyle-altering cost-coping strategies to manage treatment

The majority of patients with locally advanced head and neck cancers (LAHNC) rely on cost-coping strategies that alter their lifestyle in order to manage the financial burden of their care, according to research presented at the 2016 Multidisciplinary Head and Neck Cancer Symposium. [More]
Uninsured and Medicaid patients have higher overall and cancer-specific mortality rates

Uninsured and Medicaid patients have higher overall and cancer-specific mortality rates

Compared to patients with non-Medicaid insurance, uninsured patients and patients with Medicaid are more likely to present with advanced stages of head and neck cancer and have higher overall and cancer-specific mortality rates, according to research presented at the 2016 Multidisciplinary Head and Neck Cancer Symposium. [More]

Blue Cross Blue Shield Association commits to address nation's growing opioid crisis

Blue Cross Blue Shield Association and top executives from Blue Cross and Blue Shield companies around the country today committed to addressing the nation's growing opioid crisis with an executive-level committee that will investigate its impact on individuals, local communities and the healthcare system as a whole. [More]
Covered California chooses VSP Vision Care to provide access to quality eye care for Californians

Covered California chooses VSP Vision Care to provide access to quality eye care for Californians

Covered California announced today that it has selected VSP Vision Care, the nation's largest healthcare organization by membership, to offer access to vision care coverage for adults throughout the state. [More]
ACC, AHA support implementation of proposed cardiovascular measures, with reservations

ACC, AHA support implementation of proposed cardiovascular measures, with reservations

Quality measures announced today by the Core Quality Measures Collaborative represent a step forward in reducing paperwork and confusion while also allowing providers to focus on measures that impact patient outcomes, the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Heart Association (AHA) said in support of implementation of the proposed cardiovascular measures. But the groups expressed reservations about blood pressure targets included in the measures. [More]
Benefit of using antibody-coated drug-eluting stents for CHD still unclear, shows report

Benefit of using antibody-coated drug-eluting stents for CHD still unclear, shows report

In patients with coronary heart disease requiring a stent implantation, the benefit of treatment with antibody-coated drug-eluting stents (ABC-DES) versus drug-eluting stents without antibody coating (DES) is still unclear. [More]

Survey: 43% of Americans likely to pay more for health insurance in 2016

According to the latest survey conducted by leading personal finance website GOBankingRates.com, 43 percent of Americans expect to pay more for health insurance in 2016, with 23 percent expecting to pay "a little more than the last year" and 20 percent expecting to pay "a lot more than the last year." [More]
UMD investigators assess potential health hazards associated with fracking in Maryland

UMD investigators assess potential health hazards associated with fracking in Maryland

Following their release of a state-commissioned study on the potential public health impacts of fracking in Western Maryland, University of Maryland researchers are helping to inform the conversation about the potential risks associated with unconventional natural gas development and production. [More]
UPMC uses simple gene test to personalize medications for patients undergoing heart catheterization

UPMC uses simple gene test to personalize medications for patients undergoing heart catheterization

Patients who go to UPMC Presbyterian for heart catheterization and who receive a stent to treat clogged arteries are now being screened with a simple blood test to determine if they have a gene variant that makes them less likely to respond to a blood-thinning medication commonly prescribed after the procedure. [More]
Using BMI to measure health incorrectly labels over 54 million Americans as 'unhealthy', study finds

Using BMI to measure health incorrectly labels over 54 million Americans as 'unhealthy', study finds

Over the past few years, body mass index, a ratio of a person's height and weight, has effectively become a proxy for whether a person is considered healthy. Many U.S. companies use their employees' BMIs as a factor in determining workers' health care costs. And people with higher BMIs could soon have to pay higher health insurance premiums, if a rule proposed in April by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission is adopted. [More]
FedMed gains access to Trovagene's Precision Cancer Monitoring tests and service

FedMed gains access to Trovagene's Precision Cancer Monitoring tests and service

Trovagene, Inc., a developer of cell-free molecular diagnostics, announced today that it has entered into an agreement with FedMed, Inc. establishing health benefit access to Trovagene's full line of Precision Cancer Monitoring (PCM) tests and services. [More]
Young African Americans, Hispanics fare worse when faced with Hodgkin lymphoma

Young African Americans, Hispanics fare worse when faced with Hodgkin lymphoma

African American and Hispanic adolescents and young adults fare far worse than their white counterparts when faced with a mostly curable type of cancer, Hodgkin lymphoma, a study by a UC Davis epidemiologist has found. [More]
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