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Study highlights ongoing global epidemic of HIV among gay men

Study highlights ongoing global epidemic of HIV among gay men

Gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men continue to have disproportionately high burdens of HIV infection in countries of low, middle and high income around the world, a new study led by the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health suggests. [More]
Study shows wealthier Americans receive more health care than lower-income groups

Study shows wealthier Americans receive more health care than lower-income groups

Inequality in the use of health care has increased dramatically in recent years, with wealthier Americans, who tend to be healthier, now consuming the most care, according to a study published today [Wednesday, July 6] in the July issue of Health Affairs. [More]
Genetic test detects colon cancer-linked DNA in blood to predict disease recurrence risk

Genetic test detects colon cancer-linked DNA in blood to predict disease recurrence risk

Scientists at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center and University of Melbourne report they have used a genetic test that spots bits of cancer-related DNA circulating in the blood to accurately predict the likelihood of the disease's return in some — but not all — of a small group of patients with early-stage colon cancer. [More]
Bringing healthcare home: an interview with Dr Andrew Lin

Bringing healthcare home: an interview with Dr Andrew Lin

The goal of CliniCloud is to bring healthcare home. For us, what that means is a patient-centered and patient-modeled healthcare system, where we focus on the fact that consumers want access to healthcare and to a doctor. We're building an ecosystem around the tools and the software to really enable that to happen as conveniently and as affordably as possible. [More]
Study shows increase in costs of hospitalization for people with private insurance

Study shows increase in costs of hospitalization for people with private insurance

Even if you have what you might think of as good health insurance, your next hospital stay could cost you more than $1,000 out of your own pocket. [More]
African Americans perceive depression as weakness rather than health condition

African Americans perceive depression as weakness rather than health condition

Depression in African Americans, according to Sirry Alang, assistant professor of sociology and anthropology at Lehigh University, is expressed in ways that are inconsistent with symptoms of depression laid out in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. [More]
Telephone counseling can help make cancer genetic services more accessible to rural women

Telephone counseling can help make cancer genetic services more accessible to rural women

Ever since Angelina Jolie used cancer genetic counseling and testing to learn about her risk for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer, many other women have chosen to do the same. [More]
Study evaluates rate of depression in mothers based on different onset times

Study evaluates rate of depression in mothers based on different onset times

Postpartum depression--a household term since actress Brooke Shields went public in 2005 about her struggle with it--is indeed serious. But depression that begins before or during pregnancy is often more severe because it lasts longer and usually goes undetected until the doctor screens for it after the birth of the baby, according to a new Northwestern Medicine study. [More]
CHD rates decrease significantly in the U.S.

CHD rates decrease significantly in the U.S.

Significant improvements seen across multiple sociodemographic groups, according to a new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine [More]
Comprehensive workplace hand hygiene program helps reduce medical insurance claims for illnesses

Comprehensive workplace hand hygiene program helps reduce medical insurance claims for illnesses

A workplace outcome study published in The Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine found that offices equipped with alcohol-based hand sanitizers and hand sanitizing wipes throughout the building and at employees' desks resulted in 24.3 percent fewer healthcare claims for hand hygiene preventable illnesses -- such as cold, flu and respiratory illnesses -- than the office and employees in the control group without these products. [More]
Children in foster care still face quality challenges in antipsychotic medication use

Children in foster care still face quality challenges in antipsychotic medication use

Significant quality challenges persist in antipsychotic medication use for children in foster care and other Medicaid-insured children, according to a new Rutgers University-New Brunswick study published in Health Affairs. [More]
Financial pressures prevent access to much-needed care for cancer patients

Financial pressures prevent access to much-needed care for cancer patients

Financial pressures kept cancer patients from filling prescription medications and attending their doctors' visits, University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers found in a new study. [More]
Understanding chemotherapy cost differences could help patients in making informed decisions

Understanding chemotherapy cost differences could help patients in making informed decisions

Costs associated with different breast cancer chemotherapy regimens can vary significantly, regardless of effectiveness, according to new research from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. Understanding cost differences should help guide informed discussions between patients and physicians when considering chemotherapy options. [More]
Study finds increased risk of mortality in black, Hispanic cancer patients

Study finds increased risk of mortality in black, Hispanic cancer patients

Hispanic white and non-Hispanic black cancer patients between ages 15 and 29 may be more likely than same-aged white patients to die of their disease, according to a University of Colorado Cancer Center study presented at the American Society for Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting 2016. [More]
Study uncovers racial, working class discrimination in private mental health care market

Study uncovers racial, working class discrimination in private mental health care market

A new study suggests that psychotherapists discriminate against prospective patients who are black or working class. [More]
Heart failure patients who receive influenza vaccine less likely to develop dementia

Heart failure patients who receive influenza vaccine less likely to develop dementia

Influenza vaccination is associated with a lower risk of dementia in patients with heart failure, according to a study in more than 20 000 patients presented today at Heart Failure 2016 and the 3rd World Congress on Acute Heart Failure by Dr Ju-Chi Liu, director of the Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Medicine, Taipei Medical University - Shuang Ho Hospital, in New Taipei City, Taiwan. [More]
More than 7 in 10 older hip fracture patients not aware of having osteoporosis

More than 7 in 10 older hip fracture patients not aware of having osteoporosis

More than 7 in 10 older adults who suffer hip fractures aren't told they have the bone-weakening disease osteoporosis - despite the fact that hip fractures nearly always signify the presence of this potentially debilitating condition, according to revealing new research by Northwell Health physicians. [More]

New data-driven simulator may help families select best health insurance policies

Using technologies originally developed to evaluate complex investments and portfolios, a new data-driven simulator is being developed to help individuals and families evaluate health plans and select the health insurance policies most likely to meet their projected needs, with realistic cost estimates under a wide range of potential healthcare outcomes. [More]
Physicians come together for single-payer national health insurance reform

Physicians come together for single-payer national health insurance reform

In a dramatic show of physician support for deeper health reform - and for making a decisive break with the private insurance model of financing medical care - 2,231 physicians called today [Thursday, May 5] for the creation of a publicly financed, single-payer national health program that would cover all Americans for all medically necessary care. [More]
Early viral respiratory infections may increase type 1 diabetes risk in children

Early viral respiratory infections may increase type 1 diabetes risk in children

Viral respiratory infections during the first six months of life are associated with an increased risk for type 1 diabetes. This is the conclusion reached by a team of scientists at the Helmholtz Zentrum München during a study published in the current issue of the renowned US magazine 'JAMA'. [More]
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