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FDA clears AliveCor's automated detectors that record and display ECG rhythm

FDA clears AliveCor's automated detectors that record and display ECG rhythm

AliveCor, Inc. announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has granted the company clearance for two new algorithms giving users instant feedback on their electrocardiogram (ECG) recordings and expanding its automated interpretation service offerings. [More]
Study finds that African-American people with colon cancer have lower survival rates

Study finds that African-American people with colon cancer have lower survival rates

African-American people diagnosed with colon cancer have consistently lower survival rates compared with white patients, despite a nationwide decline in colon cancer deaths overall. [More]
AliveCor receives CE Mark clearance for algorithm to detect atrial fibrillation

AliveCor receives CE Mark clearance for algorithm to detect atrial fibrillation

AliveCor, Inc. announced today it has received CE Mark clearance for its automated analysis process (algorithm) to detect atrial fibrillation (AF), the most common heart rhythm disturbance and a leading cause of stroke. The latest version of the AliveECG app for users in the United Kingdom and Ireland now provides patients with real-time AF detection in electrocardiogram (ECG) recordings using the AliveCor Heart Monitor. [More]
Meridian Health prepares for ninth annual Paint the Town Pink event

Meridian Health prepares for ninth annual Paint the Town Pink event

Meridian Health is gearing up for the ninth annual Paint the Town Pink event and is seeking community members to get involved in committees throughout Monmouth and Ocean counties. An informational mixer will take place on Thursday, January 22, 2015 at Townsquare Media Broadcast Studios (home of 94.3 the Point and 92.7 WOBM), in Toms River at 6:30 p.m. [More]
Leading cardiac specialists propose new guidelines for donor heart allocation

Leading cardiac specialists propose new guidelines for donor heart allocation

A group of leading cardiac specialists has proposed new guidelines for the allocation of donor hearts to patients awaiting transplant. The changes are aimed at improving the organ distribution process to increase the survival rate of patients awaiting transplant and posttransplant. [More]
Individualized, patient-centered care needed to treat and monitor people with chronic pain

Individualized, patient-centered care needed to treat and monitor people with chronic pain

An independent panel convened by the National Institutes of Health concluded that individualized, patient-centered care is needed to treat and monitor the estimated 100 million Americans living with chronic pain. To achieve this aim, the panel recommends more research and development around the evidence-based, multidisciplinary approaches needed to balance patient perspectives, desired outcomes, and safety. [More]
Georgia State University awarded contract to improve mental health services for Georgia's youth

Georgia State University awarded contract to improve mental health services for Georgia's youth

Georgia State University's School of Public Health has received a five-year, $800,000 contract from the Georgia Department of Education to coordinate Youth Mental Health First Aid Training (YMHFA) and other professional development efforts designed to improve services for Georgia's youth. [More]
Inovalon announces list of organizations supported through its charitable contributions during 2014

Inovalon announces list of organizations supported through its charitable contributions during 2014

Inovalon Holdings, Inc., a leading technology company providing advanced analytics and data-driven intervention platforms to the healthcare industry, today announced the list of organizations supported through its charitable contributions during 2014. [More]
Research: Reducing emergency surgery for common procedures could cut health care costs

Research: Reducing emergency surgery for common procedures could cut health care costs

New research indicates that reducing emergency surgery for three common procedures by 10 percent could cut $1 billion in health care costs over 10 years. [More]
COUNTDOWN research consortium focuses on neglected tropical diseases

COUNTDOWN research consortium focuses on neglected tropical diseases

The COUNTDOWN research consortium has been launched today following a £7 million grant allocation from the UK Department for International Development earlier in the year. [More]
WHO reviews health services in Ebola-affected countries

WHO reviews health services in Ebola-affected countries

On 10-11 December 2014, Ministers of Health and Finance of Ebola-affected countries, international organizations and development partners assembled for a high-level meeting on how to strengthen systems of health in Ebola-affected countries and agreed on what needs to be done to rebuild and strengthen essential health services in these countries. [More]

Hospice of the Western Reserve, Hospice of Dayton partner to provide quality care for all Ohioans

Ohio's two largest hospice care providers - Hospice of the Western Reserve and Hospice of Dayton - have announced a collaborative initiative to ensure delivery of the highest quality of care for all Ohioans. The partnership will focus on creating best practice standards for hospice and palliative care, proactively sharing quality data, benchmarking performance to continuously improve care delivery and creating the most skilled workforce. [More]
Diplomat announces new partnership with Novation through Hospital Specialty Rx Program

Diplomat announces new partnership with Novation through Hospital Specialty Rx Program

Diplomat, the nation's largest independent specialty pharmacy, has announced a new partnership with Novation through their Hospital Specialty Rx Program. [More]
STSI researchers launch study to examine root cause of sudden unexpected death

STSI researchers launch study to examine root cause of sudden unexpected death

Researchers at the Scripps Translational Science Institute have launched a clinical trial aimed at cracking one of the toughest mysteries in forensic science -- sudden unexplained death. [More]
New study compares characteristics of hospice patients in nursing homes and community settings

New study compares characteristics of hospice patients in nursing homes and community settings

As hospice for nursing home patients grows dramatically, a new study from the Regenstrief Institute and the Indiana University Center for Aging Research compares the characteristics of hospice patients in nursing homes with hospice patients living in the community. The study also provides details on how hospice patients move in and out of these two settings. [More]
Treatment guidelines lacking for Ebola patients, say infectious diseases experts

Treatment guidelines lacking for Ebola patients, say infectious diseases experts

As the Ebola Virus Diseases (EVD) epidemic continues to rage in West Africa, infectious diseases experts call attention to the striking lack of treatment guidelines. With over 16,000 total cases and more than 500 new infections reported per week, and probable underreporting of both cases and fatalities, the medical community still does not have specific approved treatment in place for Ebola, according to an editorial published in the International Journal of Infectious Diseases. [More]

Banner Health chooses Craneware's Chargemaster Corporate Toolkit to support ongoing growth

With healthcare consolidation on the rise, Craneware, Inc., the healthcare market leader in automated revenue integrity solutions, today announced that Banner Health, one of the largest not-for-profit healthcare systems in the US, has selected Craneware's Chargemaster Corporate Toolkit to support its ongoing growth and efficient integration across newly acquired facilities. [More]
Report: Governments have strong economic incentives to invest in early childhood nutrition

Report: Governments have strong economic incentives to invest in early childhood nutrition

There are strong economic incentives for governments to invest in early childhood nutrition, reports a new paper from the University of Waterloo and Cornell University. Published for the Copenhagen Consensus Centre, the paper reveals that every dollar spent on nutrition during the first 1,000 days of a child's life can provide a country up to $166 in future earnings. [More]
Better planning needed to improve mother-infant outcomes in hospitals, say CHOP researchers

Better planning needed to improve mother-infant outcomes in hospitals, say CHOP researchers

What does it mean for expectant mothers and hospitals when there are large-scale closures of maternity units? A new study led by researchers at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia provides an inside view from hospital staff members in Philadelphia, where 13 out of 19 obstetric units closed in a 15-year period. [More]
Corrective information can successfully reduce false beliefs about flu vaccines

Corrective information can successfully reduce false beliefs about flu vaccines

With health systems in the U.S., U.K., and around the world trying to increase vaccination levels, it is critical to understand how to address vaccine hesitancy and counter myths about vaccine safety. A new article in the journal "Vaccine" concludes, however, that correcting myths about vaccines may not be the most effective approach to promoting immunization among vaccine skeptics. [More]