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Study explores outcomes of lung transplantations after implementing need-based allocation system

Study explores outcomes of lung transplantations after implementing need-based allocation system

Since implementation of a medical need-based allocation system of donor lungs in 2005, double-lung transplantation has been associated with better graft survival than single-lung transplantation in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF); at 5 years, there has been no survival difference between single- and double-lung transplant recipients in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), according to a study in the March 3 issue of JAMA. [More]
Brain scientists map changes in communication between nerve cells in rats

Brain scientists map changes in communication between nerve cells in rats

Lights, sound, action: we are constantly learning how to incorporate outside sensations into our reactions in specific situations. In a new study, brain scientists have mapped changes in communication between nerve cells as rats learned to make specific decisions in response to particular sounds. The team then used this map to accurately predict the rats' reactions. These results add to our understanding of how the brain processes sensations and forms memories to inform behavior. [More]
Extending use of bupropion before quitting reduces smoking behavior

Extending use of bupropion before quitting reduces smoking behavior

Smokers may be more likely to successfully quit their habit if simple adjustments were made to how an existing anti-smoking medication is prescribed, according to a new study by a University at Buffalo research team. [More]
Higher intake of lycopene may lower risk of renal cell carcinoma in postmenopausal women

Higher intake of lycopene may lower risk of renal cell carcinoma in postmenopausal women

A higher intake by postmenopausal women of the natural antioxidant lycopene, found in foods like tomatoes, watermelon and papaya, may lower the risk of renal cell carcinoma, a type of kidney cancer. [More]
Study explores use of antipsychotic medications among pediatric patients

Study explores use of antipsychotic medications among pediatric patients

More kids nationwide are taking medications designed to treat such mental illnesses as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, and pediatricians and psychiatrists at the University of Vermont want to know why. [More]
Findings may explain why HIV cure strategies have failed

Findings may explain why HIV cure strategies have failed

A major hurdle to curing people of HIV infection is the way the virus hides in a reservoir composed primarily of dormant immune cells. [More]
Final agenda for upcoming HxRefactored Conference announced

Final agenda for upcoming HxRefactored Conference announced

Health 2.0 and Mad*Pow announce the final agenda for the upcoming HxRefactored Conference, April 1-2 in Boston, Massachusetts. HxRefactored is a revolutionary design and technology conference gathering over 600 designers, developers, and entrepreneurs in health care for two days of thought provoking panels, workshops and discussions on how to improve the quality of the health experience. [More]
NIAID partners with Liberian government to test ZMapp drug for Ebola virus disease

NIAID partners with Liberian government to test ZMapp drug for Ebola virus disease

In partnership with the Liberian government, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases today launched a clinical trial to obtain safety and efficacy data on the investigational drug ZMapp as a treatment for Ebola virus disease. The study, which will be conducted in Liberia and the United States, is a randomized controlled trial enrolling adults and children with known Ebola virus infection. [More]
Active shooter incidents growing in U.S. hospitals

Active shooter incidents growing in U.S. hospitals

A new Viewpoint article in The Journal of the American Medical Association questions whether the notion of the community hospital as a sanctuary from violence may have become too quaint. The fatal shooting death of a Boston surgeon Jan. 20, 2015, the authors note, was another in what appears to be an increasingly frequent series of "active shooter" incidents in U.S. health care facilities. [More]
UMass Amherst biologist partners with Chinese scientist to develop novel drug platform

UMass Amherst biologist partners with Chinese scientist to develop novel drug platform

Margaret Riley, an evolutionary biologist at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and pioneer in fighting antibiotic-resistant bacteria, announced this week that she is partnering with a Chinese scientist to develop a new drug platform, pheromonicins. The Chinese government is committing $400 million per year to support the newly created Pheromonicin Institute of Beijing. [More]
UTHealth study explores use of app to help improve health of minority stroke patients

UTHealth study explores use of app to help improve health of minority stroke patients

A clinical trial investigating the use of a physician-monitored app to help first-time minority stroke patients become healthier has begun at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. [More]
Patients with symptoms of mental illness less likely to receive advice from health care providers

Patients with symptoms of mental illness less likely to receive advice from health care providers

More than half of patients with symptoms of mental illness - and nearly one-third of those who also had diabetes - said their health care providers had never told them to exercise or reduce their intake of dietary fat, according to a new study published in Diabetes Educator. [More]
Changes to DNA sequence associated with peanut allergy

Changes to DNA sequence associated with peanut allergy

Research funded by the National Institutes of Health suggests that changes in a small region of chromosome 6 are risk factors for peanut allergy in U.S. children of European descent. The genetic risk area is located among two tightly linked genes that regulate the presentation of allergens and microbial products to the immune system. This study is the first to use a genome-wide screening approach in patients with well-defined food allergy to identify risks for peanut allergy. [More]
Medicago receives task order from HHS BARDA to manufacture anti-Ebola virus monoclonal antibodies

Medicago receives task order from HHS BARDA to manufacture anti-Ebola virus monoclonal antibodies

Medicago, a leading company in the development and production of plant-based vaccines and therapeutics, announced today that it has received a task order from the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services for three anti-Ebola virus monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) with expected performance comparable to that of ZMapp, from Mapp Biopharmaceutical. [More]
Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation announces Quality of Life grants for 75 nonprofit organizations

Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation announces Quality of Life grants for 75 nonprofit organizations

The Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation, a leading nonprofit dedicated to improving quality of life for individuals living with paralysis, announced it has awarded $600,137 in Quality of Life grants to 75 nonprofit organizations nationwide. [More]

Winners of ECRI Institute's 2015 Healthcare Supply Chain Achievement Award announced

ECRI Institute is proud to announce the winners of its fourth annual Healthcare Supply Chain Achievement Award. The prestigious award honors healthcare organizations that demonstrate excellence in overall spend management and in adopting best practice solutions in their supply chain processes. [More]
IDRI Announces $4M BARDA Cooperative Agreement To Establish Adjuvant Hub

IDRI Announces $4M BARDA Cooperative Agreement To Establish Adjuvant Hub

The international outbreak of Ebola in 2014 serves as a reminder for the need to be proactive in preparing for the rapid spread of any newly emerging or re-emerging infectious disease. IDRI today announces it has received $4 million in funding from the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority, part of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, to develop an adjuvant manufacturing hub with both preclinical and clinical expertise to facilitate pandemic influenza preparedness in developing countries. [More]

New doctorate program to study substance use and related social, health consequences

A new Joint Doctoral Program (JDP) in Interdisciplinary Research on Substance Use has been launched by the Division of Global Public Health in the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and San Diego State University's School of Social Work. The program will emphasize research devoted to studying the use and misuse of alcohol and drugs - and related social and health consequences. [More]
NIH-sponsored clinical trials examine safety, acceptability of HIV antiretroviral medicines

NIH-sponsored clinical trials examine safety, acceptability of HIV antiretroviral medicines

Two new clinical trials are examining the safety and acceptability of antiretroviral medicines administered via injection as a means of protecting against HIV infection. The studies are being funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health, and conducted by the NIAID-funded HIV Prevention Trials Network (HPTN). [More]
NIAID expands Tuberculosis Research Units program to drive innovation in TB research

NIAID expands Tuberculosis Research Units program to drive innovation in TB research

The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health, is expanding its Tuberculosis Research Units program in an effort to drive innovation in tuberculosis (TB) research. NIAID is awarding up to $15.2 million in fiscal year 2015 and as much as $105.3 million over seven years to fund four institutions that will act as a collaborative TBRU network. [More]