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Mayo Clinic scientists create mouse model of ALS, FTD caused by mutations in C9ORF72 gene

Mayo Clinic scientists create mouse model of ALS, FTD caused by mutations in C9ORF72 gene

Scientists at Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, Florida created a novel mouse that exhibits the symptoms and neurodegeneration associated with the most common genetic forms of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, Lou Gehrig's disease), both of which are caused by a mutation in the a gene called C9ORF72. [More]
New microfluidic chip can capture rare clusters of circulating tumor cells

New microfluidic chip can capture rare clusters of circulating tumor cells

Researchers have developed a microfluidic chip that can capture rare clusters of circulating tumor cells, which could yield important new insights into how cancer spreads. The work was funded by the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, part of the National Institutes of Health. [More]

WHO Regional Office for the Eastern Mediterranean press release: WHO delivers additional medicines and medical supplies into Yemen

WHO is also providing a shipment of anti-malaria medicines from the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria sufficient for 44 950 treatment courses of malaria... [More]
Kent researchers assess how smartphone uses interfere with treadmill exercise

Kent researchers assess how smartphone uses interfere with treadmill exercise

Kent State University researchers Jacob Barkley, Ph.D., and Andrew Lepp, Ph.D., as well as Kent State alumni Michael Rebold, Ph.D., and Gabe Sanders, Ph.D., assessed how common smartphone uses - texting and talking - interfere with treadmill exercise. [More]
MRI screening helps in accurate and rapid stroke treatment

MRI screening helps in accurate and rapid stroke treatment

Time is critical when it comes to stroke, and early treatment is associated with better outcomes. According to the Screening with MRI for Accurate and Rapid stroke Treatment (SMART) study, small changes in quality improvement procedures enabled clinicians to use MRI scans to diagnose stroke patients before giving acute treatment, within 60 minutes of hospital arrival. [More]
Secondhand exposure to cannabis smoke under extreme conditions impairs cognitive performance

Secondhand exposure to cannabis smoke under extreme conditions impairs cognitive performance

Secondhand exposure to cannabis smoke under "extreme conditions," such as an unventilated room or enclosed vehicle, can cause nonsmokers to feel the effects of the drug, have minor problems with memory and coordination, and in some cases test positive for the drug in a urinalysis. [More]
FDA licenses Protein Sciences' Pearl River, NY facility to manufacture Flublok influenza vaccine

FDA licenses Protein Sciences' Pearl River, NY facility to manufacture Flublok influenza vaccine

Protein Sciences Corporation announced that on May 12, 2015 the U.S. Food and Drug Administration licensed its Pearl River, NY manufacturing facility for the commercial manufacturing of Flublok influenza vaccine. Flublok is the world's first licensed influenza vaccine made using modern recombinant technology. [More]

Emergency preparedness pays off as Kathmandu hospitals respond to earthquakes

As of today, more than 8200 people are reported to have been killed in the earthquakes and over 19,000 injured... [More]
Scientists uncover mechanism behind 'tubulin code'

Scientists uncover mechanism behind 'tubulin code'

Driving down the highway, you encounter ever-changing signs -- speed limits, exits, food and gas options. Seeing these roadside markers may cause you to slow down, change lanes or start thinking about lunch. In a similar way, cellular structures called microtubules are tagged with a variety of chemical markers that can influence cell functions. [More]
9-Valent HPV vaccine can potentially prevent 80% of cervical cancers in the U.S.

9-Valent HPV vaccine can potentially prevent 80% of cervical cancers in the U.S.

The new 9-valent human papillomavirus vaccine, can potentially prevent 80 percent of cervical cancers in the United States, if given to all 11- or 12-year-old children before they are exposed to the virus. [More]
GTEx findings reveal how genomic variants can affect gene activity and disease susceptibility

GTEx findings reveal how genomic variants can affect gene activity and disease susceptibility

Researchers funded by the National Institutes of Health Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) project have created a new and much-anticipated data resource to help establish how differences in an individual's genomic make-up can affect gene activity and contribute to disease. [More]
Many U.S. adults not undergoing recommended screenings for colorectal, breast and cervical cancers

Many U.S. adults not undergoing recommended screenings for colorectal, breast and cervical cancers

Many adults in the U.S. are not getting the recommended screening tests for colorectal, breast and cervical cancers, according to data published in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. For 2013, screening for these types of cancers either fell behind previous rates or showed no improvement. [More]
Comprehensive stroke centers reduce mortality risk in patients treated for hemorrhagic stroke

Comprehensive stroke centers reduce mortality risk in patients treated for hemorrhagic stroke

New research published today in the Journal of the American Heart Association indicates that patients who are treated for hemorrhagic stroke at a comprehensive stroke center are more likely to receive specialized treatment, reducing the risk of mortality. [More]
Scientists solve mystery about the origin of ovarian cell

Scientists solve mystery about the origin of ovarian cell

Scientists at the National Institutes of Health have solved a long-standing mystery about the origin of one of the cell types that make up the ovary. The team also discovered how ovarian cells share information during development of an ovarian follicle, which holds the maturing egg. [More]
Indivior reports top-line results from RBP-7000 phase 3 trial for treatment of schizophrenia

Indivior reports top-line results from RBP-7000 phase 3 trial for treatment of schizophrenia

Indivior PLC today announced top-line results from its phase 3 clinical trial of RBP-7000, an investigational drug in development for the treatment of schizophrenia. In this pivotal study, both doses of RBP-7000 tested, 90 mg and 120 mg administered once-monthly, met the primary endpoint with statistically and clinically significant reductions in the symptoms of acute schizophrenia over an 8-week treatment period. [More]
Findings provide glimmer of hope for treating diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas

Findings provide glimmer of hope for treating diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas

Using brain tumor samples collected from children in the United States and Europe, an international team of scientists found that the drug panobinostat and similar gene regulating drugs may be effective at treating diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas (DIPG), an aggressive and lethal form of pediatric cancer. [More]
SLU selected to work on universal flu vaccine project

SLU selected to work on universal flu vaccine project

Supported by a federal contract, Saint Louis University will study a concept for a universal flu vaccine that is designed to protect people from influenza pandemics that could turn deadly as well as seasonal flu caused by the influenza A virus. [More]
New microneedle patch simplifies measles vaccination

New microneedle patch simplifies measles vaccination

A new microneedle patch being developed by the Georgia Institute of Technology and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) could make it easier to vaccinate people against measles and other vaccine-preventable diseases. [More]
Emergency body cooling, therapeutic hypothermia yield similar outcomes for children with cardiac arrest

Emergency body cooling, therapeutic hypothermia yield similar outcomes for children with cardiac arrest

A large-scale, multicenter study has shown that emergency body cooling does not improve survival rates or reduce brain injury in infants and children with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest more than normal temperature control. [More]
U-M study: Nearly half of American hospitals not taking key steps to prevent C. diff infections

U-M study: Nearly half of American hospitals not taking key steps to prevent C. diff infections

Nearly half of American hospitals aren't taking key steps to prevent a kind of gut infection that kills nearly 30,000 people annually and sickens hundreds of thousands more - despite strong evidence that such steps work, according to a new study. [More]
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