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Study: High school athletes use smokeless tobacco at a higher rate compared to non-athletes

Study: High school athletes use smokeless tobacco at a higher rate compared to non-athletes

High school athletes who play on sports teams smoke tobacco products at a lower rate than non-athletes, but use smokeless tobacco at a higher rate, according to a study published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in today's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR). [More]
New NIH grants support research that combines DNA sequence information and electronic medical records

New NIH grants support research that combines DNA sequence information and electronic medical records

A dozen awards from the National Institutes of Health will support research that incorporates DNA sequence information into electronic medical records. The goal of research conducted by the Electronic Medical Records and Genomics (eMERGE) network is to better understand the genomic basis of disease and to tailor medical care to individual patients based on their genomic differences. [More]
Report: 3 out of 4 U.S. adults have hearts older than their actual age

Report: 3 out of 4 U.S. adults have hearts older than their actual age

Your heart may be older than you are – and that's not good. According to a new CDC Vital Signs report, 3 out of 4 U.S. adults have a predicted heart age that is older than their actual age. This means they are at higher risk for heart attacks and stroke. [More]
Scientists closer to understanding how neurons are wired to form circuits in the eye

Scientists closer to understanding how neurons are wired to form circuits in the eye

When we move our head, the whole visual world moves across our eyes. Yet we can still make out a bee buzzing by or a hawk flying overhead, thanks to unique cells in the eye called object motion sensors. [More]
Most American schools implement healthy practices to meet federal school meal standards

Most American schools implement healthy practices to meet federal school meal standards

Most schools in the U.S. are implementing healthy practices to help meet federal school meal standards by offering whole grains, more fruits and vegetables, and reducing sodium content, according to data published today in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. [More]
Vaccine exemption levels low, vaccination rates high in U.S.

Vaccine exemption levels low, vaccination rates high in U.S.

Vaccine exemption levels for kindergarteners are low for most states and infant vaccination rates are high nationally, according to data from two reports published in this week's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. [More]
Pre-birth arsenic exposure associated with early puberty, obesity in mice

Pre-birth arsenic exposure associated with early puberty, obesity in mice

Female mice exposed in utero, or in the womb, to low levels of arsenic through drinking water displayed signs of early puberty and became obese as adults, according to scientists from the National Institutes of Health. [More]
Study outlines new approach to studying public health data

Study outlines new approach to studying public health data

A paper co-published by College of Health and Human Services faculty is demonstrating the capability of new technology that allows in-depth analysis of health outcomes amongst different groups. Published in the American Journal of Preventative Medicine, the research outlines a novel approach to studying public health data. [More]
Omega-3 supplements fail to slow cognitive decline in older persons, NIH clinical study shows

Omega-3 supplements fail to slow cognitive decline in older persons, NIH clinical study shows

While some research suggests that a diet high in omega-3 fatty acids can protect brain health, a large clinical trial by researchers at the National Institutes of Health found that omega-3 supplements did not slow cognitive decline in older persons. With 4,000 patients followed over a five-year period, the study is one of the largest and longest of its kind. [More]
Elite CBD Remedy Tincture now available through Mary's Nutritionals

Elite CBD Remedy Tincture now available through Mary's Nutritionals

Elite Botanicals, the leading cultivator of CBD-rich hemp in Colorado, today announced that it's Elite CBD Remedy Tincture is now available through medical and recreational dispensaries in Colorado, as well as online through Mary's Nutritionals. [More]
Three projects that focus on improving global health win DEBUT Challenge

Three projects that focus on improving global health win DEBUT Challenge

Three unique projects focused on improving global health won the National Institutes of Health's Design by Biomedical Undergraduate Teams (DEBUT) Challenge. The winners showed exemplary initiative in designing tools for a less expensive, portable device to monitor HIV treatment, a new surgical clamp to treat drooping eyelids, and a low-cost patient monitor. [More]
Social and environmental processes linked to 2009 H1N1 pandemic outbreaks in Mexico

Social and environmental processes linked to 2009 H1N1 pandemic outbreaks in Mexico

Scientists studying the 2009 A/H1N1 influenza pandemic have found that the inconsistent regional timing of pandemic waves in Mexico was the result of interactions between school breaks and regional variations in humidity. [More]
Health 2.0 announces confirmed speakers at inaugural Innovating Care Delivery Symposium

Health 2.0 announces confirmed speakers at inaugural Innovating Care Delivery Symposium

As the 9th Annual Health 2.0 Fall Conference rapidly approaches, Health 2.0 is excited to announce confirmed speakers at the inaugural Innovating Care Delivery Symposium. The day-long session features an agenda with executives and providers from some of the most progressive health systems in the nation, including UCLA, UCSF, Stanford, Henry Ford, and many others. [More]
Experimental MERS-CoV vaccine shows promise in monkeys and camels

Experimental MERS-CoV vaccine shows promise in monkeys and camels

National Institutes of Health scientists and colleagues report that an experimental vaccine given six weeks before exposure to Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) fully protects rhesus macaques from disease. The vaccine also generated potentially protective MERS-CoV antibodies in blood drawn from vaccinated camels. [More]
Rowan study reveals how exposure to Hurricane Sandy impacts mental health among older adults

Rowan study reveals how exposure to Hurricane Sandy impacts mental health among older adults

Researchers from the Rowan University School of Osteopathic Medicine presented findings at the "2015 Hurricane Sandy Conference: Translating Research into Practice," showing that strong neighborhood relationships reduced the incidence of symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among older adults exposed to Hurricane Sandy, the superstorm that devastated the Northeast United States. [More]
Bacteria in gut may be the cause of uveitis in the eye

Bacteria in gut may be the cause of uveitis in the eye

The inflammatory eye disorder autoimmune uveitis occurs when a person's immune system goes awry, attacking proteins in the eye. What spurs this response is a mystery, but now a study on mice suggests that bacteria in the gut may provide a kind of training ground for immune cells to attack the eye. [More]
Nuclear process in the brain may play critical role in health and disease

Nuclear process in the brain may play critical role in health and disease

Every brain cell has a nucleus, or a central command station. Scientists have shown that the passage of molecules through the nucleus of a star-shaped brain cell, called an astrocyte, may play a critical role in health and disease. [More]
‘Medical foods’ for patients with rare IEMs may cause harm when not carefully managed

‘Medical foods’ for patients with rare IEMs may cause harm when not carefully managed

Many "medical foods" are designed to help manage patients with rare inborn errors of metabolism (IEMs), and can help prevent serious and life-threatening complications. However, such special foods may cause harm in some patients when their use is not carefully monitored and managed, according to a research team led by scientists at the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI), part of the National Institutes of Health. [More]
Low-fat diets better than low-carb diets for weight loss, NIH study finds

Low-fat diets better than low-carb diets for weight loss, NIH study finds

In a recent study, restricting dietary fat led to body fat loss at a rate 68 percent higher than cutting the same number of carbohydrate calories when adults with obesity ate strictly controlled diets. Carb restriction lowered production of the fat-regulating hormone insulin and increased fat burning as expected, whereas fat restriction had no observed changes in insulin production or fat burning. [More]
Researchers develop new genomic data set on Lassa virus

Researchers develop new genomic data set on Lassa virus

An international team of researchers has developed the largest genomic data set in the world on Lassa virus (LASV). [More]
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